Faculty Book Event: Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress–and a Plan to Stop It

Faculty Book Event: Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress–and a Plan to Stop It

Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress–and a Plan to Stop It

A conversation between Lawrence Lessig and David Gergen

 

Tuesday, November 1, 5:00 pm
Ames Courtroom, Austin Hall, Harvard Law School

Free and Open to the Public
Co-hosted by the Harvard Law School Library, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics,  HKS Center for Public Leadership, and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society

Professor David Gergen,  Director of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership converses with Professor Lawrence Lessig about his new book,  Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress—and a Plan to Stop It.

Updates and (optional) RSVP on Facebook

LIVE STREAMING: This event will also be streamed live. (QuickTime player version 7.6.2 or more recent is required to view or listen to HLS streaming media. (Older versions might not work.) The player is available for download at no cost from the Apple Web site.

About Professor Lawrence Lessig:

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, Lessig was a professor at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and at the University of Chicago. He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court.

Lessig serves on the Board of Creative Commons, MAPLight, Brave New Film Foundation, The American Academy, Berlin, AXA Research Fund and iCommons.org and on the advisory board of the Sunlight Foundation. He is a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Association, and has received numerous awards, including the Free Software Foundation’s Freedom Award, Fastcase 50 Award and being named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries.

Lessig holds a BA in economics and a BS in management from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA in philosophy from Cambridge, and a JD from Yale.

About Professor David Gergen:

David Gergen is a senior political analyst for CNN and has served as an adviser to four U.S. presidents. He is a public service professor of public leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School and the director of its Center for Public Leadership. In 2000, he published the best-selling book, Eyewitness to Power:The Essence of Leadership, Nixon to Clinton.

Gergen was born in Durham, North Carolina, where his father taught mathematics at Duke University. He graduated with honors from both Yale College (1963) and Harvard Law School (1967), and served as an officer in the U.S. Navy for nearly three and a half years, posted to a ship in Japan.

Gergen joined the Nixon White House in 1971, as a staff assistant on the speech writing team, a group of heavyweights that included Pat Buchanan, Ben Stein, and Bill Safire. Gergen went on to work in the administration of Gerald Ford and as an adviser to the 1980 George H.W. Bush presidential campaign. He served as Director of Communications for Ronald Reagan and as adviser to Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Warren Christopher on domestic and foreign affairs.

In his private life, Gergen works as a political journalist and analyst. From 1985-1986 he worked as an editor at U.S. News & World Report, where he also served as editor-at-large. Gergen’s career in television began in 1985, when he joined the MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour for widely praised Friday night discussions of politics. Today, he appears frequently on CNN as a senior political analyst and contributes a monthly column to Parade Magazine.

Gergen joined the Harvard faculty in 1999. He is active as a speaker on leadership and sits on many boards, including Teach for America, the Aspen Institute, and Duke University, where he taught from 1995-1999. He is a member of the Washington D.C. Bar and the Council on Foreign Relations, and holds 19 honorary degrees.

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