Book Talk: Klemen Jaklic, Constitutional Pluralism in the EU, Wednesday, May 14 at noon

Book Talk: Klemen Jaklic, Constitutional Pluralism in the EU, Wednesday, May 14 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Klemen Jaklic’s recently published book, Constitutional Pluralism in the EU.

Klemen Jaklic is a legal scholar and is currently a Democracy Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation. After his first law degree, he earned his masters (LL.M.) and doctorate (S.J.D.) in law from Harvard Law School, and another doctorate in law (D.Phil.) from Oxford University. He has been teaching at Harvard in various roles since 2008 in the fields of European integration and EU law, human rights, justice, ethics, constitutional law & theory, and democracy. He was awarded several teaching excellence awards by Harvard and was appointed Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School (spring 2012) where he taught his course on Europe and Democracy. His current research focuses on European constitutionalism and the future development of the idea of democracy in the context of a just global order.

jaklic draft

“Where does the law and political power of any given territory come from? Until recently it was believed that it came from a single and hierarchical source of constitutional authority, a sovereign people and their constitution. However, how can this model account for the new Europe? Where state constitutions and the European Constitution, which are ultimately equally self-standing sources of constitutional authority, overlap heterarchically over a shared piece of territory.

Constitutional pluralism is a new branch within constitutional thought that argues sovereignty is no longer the accurate and normatively superior constitutional foundation. It instead replaces this thought with its own foundation. It emerged on the basis of contributions by the leading EU constitutionalists and has now become the most dominant branch of European constitutional thought. Its claims have also overstepped the European context, suggesting that it offers historic advantages for further development of the idea of constitutionalism and world order as such.” — Oxford Univ. Press

Book talk panelists include:

HLS Professor Frank I. Michelman, Robert Walmsley University Professor, Emeritus.

Professor Vlad Perju, Director of the Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy at Boston College Law School.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Lewis International Law Center, Room 214A.  (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Free and open to the public.  Lunch will be served.