Faculty Book Talk: Dean Martha Minow and Alex Whiting: The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints, Wed., Nov. 4 at noon.

Faculty Book Talk: Dean Martha Minow and Alex Whiting: The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints, Wed., Nov. 4 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Dean Martha Minow and Professor Alex Whiting’s new book, with co-editor C. Cora True-Frost, The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints (University of Michigan Press).

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC Milstein East B/C (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

final poster minow whiting sm for blog

Martha Minow, the Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, has taught at Harvard Law School since 1981, where her courses include civil procedure, constitutional law, family law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence, law and education, nonprofit organizations, and the public law workshop. An expert in human rights and advocacy for members of racial and religious minorities and for women, children, and persons with disabilities, she also writes and teaches about privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict.

Professor True-Frost is Assistant Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law. She joins SUCOL from Harvard Law School, where she was a Climenko Fellow. Her scholarship draws from the areas of international relations theory, administrative law, and public international law. She teaches classes in international and domestic criminal law, international human rights law, and regulatory law and policy.

Professor True-Frost earned an LL.M. from Harvard Law School and a J.D./M.P.A. magna cum laude as one of two Law Fellows at SUCOL and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. She has worked in East Timor and Sierra Leone and led the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security at UN headquarters. She was also a litigation associate at Cravath, Swaine and Moore LLP. Prior to law school, she taught middle school in Baltimore and Harlem with the Teach for America program.

Alex Whiting is a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School where he teaches, writes and consults on domestic and international criminal prosecution issues. From 2010 until 2013, he was in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague where he served first as the Investigations Coordinator, overseeing all of the investigations in the office, and then as Prosecutions Coordinator, overseeing all of the office’s ongoing prosecutions. Before going to the ICC, Whiting taught for more than three years as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, again with a focus on prosecution subjects. From 2002-2007, he was a Trial Attorney and then a Senior Trial Attorney with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague. He was lead prosecution counsel in Prosecutor v. Fatmir Limaj, Isak Musliu, and Haradin Bala; Prosecutor v. Milan Martic; and Prosecutor v. Dragomir Miloševic. Before going to the ICTY, he was a U.S. federal prosecutor for ten years, first with the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division in Washington, D.C., and then with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Boston where he focused on organized crime and corruption cases. Whiting attended Yale College and Yale Law School, and clerked for Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of the Eastern District of New York. His publications include Dynamic Investigative Practice at the International Criminal Court, 76 Law and Contemporary Problems 163 (2014), International Criminal Law: Cases and Commentary (2011), co-authored with Antonio Cassese and two other authors, and In International Criminal Prosecutions, Justice Delayed Can Be Justice Delivered, 50 Harv. Int’l L. J. 323 (2009). ”

About The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints

“The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) gave rise to the first permanent Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), with independent powers of investigation and prosecution. Elected in 2003 for a nine-year term as the ICC’s first Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo established policies and practices for when and how to investigate, when to pursue prosecution, and how to obtain the cooperation of sovereign nations. He laid a foundation for the OTP’s involvement with the United Nations Security Council, state parties, nongovernmental organizations, victims, the accused, witnesses, and the media.

This volume of essays presents the first sustained examination of this unique office and offers a rare look into international justice. The contributors, ranging from legal scholars to practitioners of international law, explore the spectrum of options available to the OTP, the particular choices Moreno Ocampo made, and issues ripe for consideration as his successor, Fatou B. Bensouda, assumes her duties. The beginning of Bensouda’s term thus offers the perfect opportunity to examine the first Prosecutor’s singular efforts to strengthen international justice, in all its facets.” — University of Michigan Press

Recent Reviews:

“This book . . . offers a unique perspective on one of the most innovative international endeavors to end impunity for and prevent massive atrocities.”
—  Luis Moreno Ocampo (from the Prologue)

“The First Global Prosecutor admirably and distinctively fills a gap in the existing literature on the International Criminal Court. In bringing together essays by both leading scholars and prominent jurists in the field, Minow delivers a volume that is compendious in scope, rich with insight, and judicious in its conclusions. At once timely and important, The First Global Prosecutor offers a vital contribution to ongoing debates about the structure, function and practice of the world’s first truly global prosecutor.”
—  Lawrence Douglas, Amherst College

“There are only few works that deal in-depth with the legacy of the first years of the ICC. This volume combines ‘insider’ and ‘external’ perspectives on the first years of the Office of the Prosecutor. It captures major themes that have become relevant during Moreno Ocampo’s tenure and helps us understand the ‘light’ and ‘shadow’ of international criminal justice in situations of conflict.”
—  Carsten Stahn, Leiden University

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