Welcome LLM Students!

Welcome LLM Students!

WelcomeIt has been so great to see all of the new LLM students here at the law school during the last week or so! We are very glad you’re here. There is such wonderful energy here on campus during this time of year.

We have seen many LLM students already in our library tours and Hollis/E-Research training classes so far. If you are an LLM student and you have not had a chance to sign up for these yet, visit the Law Library Training Calendar to register – http://libcal.law.harvard.edu/calendar/researchtraining.

Comparative Law Resources in the Law Library

I often post in this blog about recently-acquired English-language comparative law resources in our collection. These types of resources can be a great way to explore the law of jurisdictions for which there are otherwise not a lot of materials in English.

One of our newer books, for example, will be very helpful to researchers who would like to conduct a multi-jurisdictional exploration of patent law:

Patent Enforcement in the U.S., Germany, and Japan
Toshiko Takenaka, et al.
Published in 2015 by Oxford University Press
Law Library, Langdell Building 3rd floor
Call number K 1505 .T35 2015

The lead author is a technology law professor at the University of Washington Law School, where she also completed her LLM and PhD. The book represents her collaboration on this subject with law professors and patent law attorneys in Germany and Japan. Topic covered include infringement, validity challenges, enforcement procedures, and remedies for each of the three jurisdictions.

Library of Congress Subject Heading Authorities in the Hollis Library Catalog

I also wanted to use this post to discuss searching the Hollis library catalog (http://hollis.harvard.edu) using subject keywords. This can be a good method for finding comparative law materials in the law library collection, not only in English but in other languages as well.

The law library’s catalogers use Library of Congress Subject Authority Headings (http://authorities.loc.gov/help/subj-auth.htm) when they catalog our library materials. Because they represent a controlled vocabulary, using LOC Subject Authority Headings in your subject keyword searches will help you find materials on the subject you specify regardless of what language the materials themselves are written in.

For example, you can search Hollis using these subject keywords:

patent laws germany japan

There are seven results for this search, four in English, one in German, and two in Japanese. The Hollis results screen is shown below.

Hollis Catalog Search Results Screen, Search is Subject Keywords: patent laws germany japan

 

In the Hollis record itself, each subject heading authority is hyperlinked. Click a link to find additional materials to which that subject heading authority was specifically assigned.

Hollis record with green box around hyperlinked subject heading authorities.

 

As you are learning how to use Hollis, you may want to experiment with searching by subject. You may find that your searches are more precise, and your search results more relevant, than using general keywords alone.

Please visit http://asklib.law.harvard.edu/ if you need help from a research librarian on searching Hollis or any other aspect of law library research.

About: Jennifer Allison

Librarian for Foreign, Comparative, and International Law, Harvard Law School Library.
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