Book Talk: Governance Feminism: An Introduction, Monday, September 17 at noon

Book Talk: Governance Feminism: An Introduction, Monday, September 17 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and discussion in celebration of the recent publication of Governance Feminism: An Introduction, edited by Janet Halley, Prabha Kotiswaran, Rachel Rebouché and Hila Shamir (Univ. Minn. Press, Mar. 13, 2018).  Janet Halley is Royall Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.  She will be joined in discussion with her co-editors: Prabha Kotiswaran, Reader in Law and Social Justice at the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London; Rachel Rebouché, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research at Temple University Beasley School of Law; and Hila Shamir, Associate Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University Buchmann Faculty of Law.

Copies of Governance Feminism: An Introduction will be available for sale courtesy of the Harvard Law School COOP and the authors will be available for signing books at the end of the talk.

Monday, September 17, 2018, at noon    YouTube Video
Harvard Law School WCC Milstein West A (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA
No RSVP required

Poster Governance Feminism

About Governance Feminism: An Introduction

“Feminists walk the halls of power.  Governance Feminism: An Introduction shows how some feminists and feminist ideas—but by no means all—have entered into state and state-like power in recent years. Being a feminist can qualify you for a job in the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Criminal Court, the local prosecutor’s office, or the child welfare bureaucracy. Feminists have built institutions and participate in governance.

The authors argue that governance feminism is institutionally diverse and globally distributed. It emerges from grassroots activism as well as statutes and treaties, as crime control and as immanent bureaucracy. Conflicts among feminists—global North and South; left, center, and right—emerge as struggles over governance. This volume collects examples from the United States, Israel, India, and from transnational human rights law.

Governance feminism poses new challenges for feminists: How shall we assess our successes and failures? What responsibility do we shoulder for the outcomes of our work? For the compromises and strange bedfellows we took on along the way?

Can feminism foster a critique of its own successes? This volume offers a pathway to critical engagement with these pressing and significant questions.” — University of Minnesota Press

Editors

Janet Halley

 

 

 

 

Janet Halley, Royall Professor of Law at Harvard Law School

 

Prabha Kotiswaran

 

 

 

Prabha Kotiswaran, Reader in Law and Social Justice at the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London

 

Rachel Rebouché

 

 

 

Rachel Rebouché, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research at Temple University Beasley School of Law

 

Hila Shamir

 

 

 

Hila Shamir, Associate Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University Buchmann Faculty of Law

 

More About Governance Feminism: An Introduction

What happens when feminist critique inverts into governing norms? What kind of feminism becomes law and what becomes of arguments among feminists when it does? How are feminist challenges to male super-ordination transformed and distributed by bureaucratization and NGO-ification? How might we honestly assess feminism that governs? In this deeply intelligent, reflective, and pedagogical work, four feminist legal scholars probe these theoretical and empirical questions. No reader will favor every move, but all will be usefully provoked and instructed. — Wendy Brown, University of California, Berkeley

The book delivers a good summary of which feminist theories have prevailed and can be seen as the governing ones. Excellent for collections on feminism and women’s rights. — Choice

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