Announcements •

Faculty Book Talk: Henry J. Steiner’s Eyeing the World, Thur. Sept. 29, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a talk and discussion about a recently published photography book titled Eyeing the World by Henry J. Steiner, Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law, Emeritus, Harvard Law School.

Copies of Eyeing the World will be available for sale and Professor Steiner will be available for signing books at the end of his talk.

Thursday September 29, 2016 at noon, with lunch

Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East A (Directions)

1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Henry Steiner book talk poster

About the Photographer

“Early in my life, photography became a favorite pastime.  Over the decades its grip on my interests and time strengthened to the point that it turned into more than a hobby if less than a career.

My academic career involved international issues requiring foreign trips, particularly in the poorer developing countries.  Beyond their professional attraction, such travels fascinated me culturally and visually.  They offered eyefuls of people and nature that seemed at once familiar and novel, conventional and puzzling.  The desire was irresistible to search for and explore those eyefuls photographically after or between my trips’ scheduled events. In addition to these academic ventures, my vacations, hikes and treks gave occasion for most of the website’s images.

Over a half century, the subject matter of my photography remained markedly diverse.  It never concentrated on a particular theme, topic or region.  The vast majority of pictures on the website cannot be cabined within a particular ideology or purpose.  Nonetheless, certain underlying ideas and beliefs are common to many photos.  They suggest a deep relationship between my academic work and much of my photography.

Over the years, the photography predictably migrated from black-and-white to color, and from film to digital. Both trends heightened and broadened my engagement with picture-taking.  They indeed transformed my relationship to the entire practice of photography.

A few words about my principal career. The images in the book straddle the four decades during which I taught at Harvard Law School, as well as the most recent decade after I became professor emeritus. Over this period, international human rights became my principal commitment in scholarship, teaching and consulting. Today I continue to explore questions of human rights and pursue public interest projects, while engaging more systematically and intensely with this brave new world of digital photography.”  — Henry J. Steiner, April 2016

Find your zone at the HLS Library

zonesThe HLS Library is a big space and there are many things you can do hereread, study, write, work on a group project, snack, call your family, study some more, write some more…you get the picture. The trick is figuring out where to do each of those things without disturbing your fellow students, and that’s why we designated zones throughout the library buildings for specific activities.

Quiet zones are for quiet reading and study. Please keep noise to a minimum and take conversations to other zones. The Reading Room and most stacks areas are quiet zones.

Collaboration zones are for working in groups or talking quietly with others who are present. The Lemann Lounge, Microforms Room booths, 3rd floor group study rooms, and the Reference Room are all collaboration zones.

Phone zones are the only areas where talking on phones is permitted. Please keep ringers on silent. The Lemann Lounge, 4th floor computer labs, copy rooms, and the bridge to the Lewis Hall stacks are all phone zones.

Food zones are the only areas where food and snacks are allowed to be consumed. This is in order to keep mice and bugs away. The Lemann Lounge and Microforms Room booths are food zones. You may have drinks throughout the building, as long as they are in covered containers to prevent disaster should a spill happen.

Hiring! LIL wants your engineering energy!








Our Library Innovation Lab wants your engineering energy to make H2O even better!

H2O is an open source platform for creating free, open-licensed, remixable textbooks. It’s used by Jonathan Zittrain, Lawrence Lessig and many other faculty members and students at Harvard Law School and other schools. It’s poised for significant expansion and ready for an upgrade. Over the next two years, we’ll launch and scale a major new version of the H2O platform, and you will lead our efforts to improve H2O’s functionality, usability and reliability.

While you’ll primarily work in Ruby on Rails and Javascript in H2O, we’ll provide plenty of space for you to play. We’re a collaborative, experimental lab, and we want you to bring us your side projects and be excited about ours. This is a great spot for people who are enthusiastic about the web and the future of libraries.

We can’t wait to talk to you!

24/7 Library Access for HLS students

Rua 24 horas (24 hour street) by Morio, Wikimedia Commons

Rua 24 horas (24 hour street) by Morio, Wikimedia Commons

This one is for HLS students only! Today is the official start of library academic year hours, which means that the 2nd (main) floor of the library is now open to HLS students around the clock, except during certain longer break periods.

If you’d like to enter after hours, please come in either side at the back of the library where Langdell Hall connects with Areeda Hall. You will need your HUID for swipe access, and you’ll need to swipe again to get into the library proper. If you have any problem with your ID not working, please contact us and we’ll get you sorted out.

Our full hours during fall semester are:

Monday-Thursday 8am-12 midnight

Friday 8am-9pm

Saturday 9am-9pm

Sunday 9am-midnight

We hope you have a great year!

Book Talk: Judge Robert L. Wilkins’ Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Mon., Sept. 19, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk in celebration of Judge Robert L. Wilkins recently published book,  Long Road to Hard Truth:  The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture Copies will be available for sale and Judge Wilkins will be available for signing books at the end of his talk.

Monday, September 19, 2016 at noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East A/B (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Judge Wilkins Book Talk Poster


Judge Wilkins was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on January 15, 2014. A native of Muncie Indiana, he obtained a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 1986 and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1989. Following law school, Judge Wilkins served as a law clerk to the Honorable Earl B. Gilliam of the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. In 1990, he joined the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, where he served first as a staff attorney in the trial and appellate divisions and later for several years as Special Litigation Chief. In 2002, he joined the law firm of Venable LLP as a partner, handling white-collar defense, intellectual property and complex civil litigation matters. During his tenure with the Public Defender Service and in private practice, Judge Wilkins served as the lead plaintiff in Wilkins, et al. v. State of Maryland, a landmark civil rights lawsuit that inspired nationwide legislative and executive reform of police stop-and-search practices and the collection of data regarding those practices. Judge Wilkins also played a key role in the establishment of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (scheduled to open in September 2016 on the National Mall), serving as the Chairman of the Site and Building Committee of the Presidential Commission whose work led to the Congressional authorization of the museum and the selection of its location. As a practicing lawyer, he was named one of the “40 under 40 most successful young litigators in America” by the National Law Journal (2002) and one of the “90 Greatest Washington Lawyers of the Last 30 Years” by the Legal Times (2008). On December 27, 2010, Judge Wilkins was appointed United States District Judge for the District of Columbia, where he served until his appointment to the D.C. Circuit.

More about Long Road to Hard Truth:  The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture

“In Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Robert L. Wilkins tells the story of how his curiosity about why there wasn’t a national museum dedicated to African American history and culture became an obsession – eventually leading him to quit his job as an attorney when his wife was seven months pregnant with their second child, and make it his mission to help the museum become a reality. Long Road to Hard Truth chronicles the early history, when staunch advocates sought to create a monument for Black soldiers fifty years after the end of the Civil War and in response to the pervasive indignities of the time, including lynching, Jim Crow segregation, and the slander of the racist film Birth of a Nation. The movement soon evolved to envision creating a national museum, and Wilkins follows the endless obstacles through the decades, culminating in his honor of becoming a member of the Presidential Commission that wrote the plan for creating the museum and how, with support of both Black and White Democrats and Republicans, Congress finally authorized the museum. In September 2016, exactly 100 years after the movement to create it began, the Smithsonian will open the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The book’s title is inspired in part by James Baldwin, who testified in Congress in 1968 that “My history . . . contains the truth about America. It is going to be hard to teach it.” Long Road to Hard Truth concludes that this journey took 100 years because many in America are unwilling to confront the history of America’s legacy of slavery and discrimination, and that the only reason this museum finally became a reality is that an unlikely, bipartisan coalition of political leaders had the courage and wisdom to declare that America could not, and should not, continue to evade the hard truth.” —

New Title Spotlight: The Liechtenstein Rules of Arbitration

One of the more recent European jurisdictions to make itself available as an arbitration venue is the Principality of Liechtenstein. In 2010, Liechtenstein amended its Civil Procedure Code (Zivilprozessordnung) to include a number of provisions related to arbitration.

The Liechtenstein Arbitration Association was formed in 2011. Since its formation, this organization has worked to establish Liechtenstein as a desirable forum for resolving disputes through arbitration. One of the means by which the organization’s membership has done this is to create the Liechtenstein Rules of Arbitration.

An English-language commentary on these rules, which includes the text of the rules in both English and French, was recently added to the law library’s collection:

The Liechtenstein Rules of Arbitration (Liechtenstein Rules): A Commentary Including the French Version and Model Clauses
Authors: Felix Dasser and Nicolas W. Reithner
Call Number: KKJ 182.9 .D37 2015
Location: Lewis (ILS) building, first floor

Co-author Felix Dasser is the head of the Ligitation/Arbitration practice team at the Homburger Law Firm in Zürich, Switzerland. He earned his LL.M. from Harvard Law School in 1990.

Learn about Caselaw Access Project on the radio!

Two weeks ago, WBUR’s Bruce Gellerman and crew paid us a visit to record a segment on our Caselaw Access Project (CAP), which will make all U.S. case law freely accessible online. You may have heard the result this morning.

If you missed it or you’d like a replay, you can catch the story on WBUR’s website. Although the transcript appears in print along with some photos, we recommend listening to get the experience of what the process sounds like as well looks like!

Learn more about the Caselaw Access Project from our past CAP posts or our Library Innovation Law website.


Welcome LLM Students!

WelcomeIt has been so great to see all of the new LLM students here at the law school during the last week or so! We are very glad you’re here. There is such wonderful energy here on campus during this time of year.

We have seen many LLM students already in our library tours and Hollis/E-Research training classes so far. If you are an LLM student and you have not had a chance to sign up for these yet, visit the Law Library Training Calendar to register –

Comparative Law Resources in the Law Library

I often post in this blog about recently-acquired English-language comparative law resources in our collection. These types of resources can be a great way to explore the law of jurisdictions for which there are otherwise not a lot of materials in English.

One of our newer books, for example, will be very helpful to researchers who would like to conduct a multi-jurisdictional exploration of patent law:

Patent Enforcement in the U.S., Germany, and Japan
Toshiko Takenaka, et al.
Published in 2015 by Oxford University Press
Law Library, Langdell Building 3rd floor
Call number K 1505 .T35 2015

The lead author is a technology law professor at the University of Washington Law School, where she also completed her LLM and PhD. The book represents her collaboration on this subject with law professors and patent law attorneys in Germany and Japan. Topic covered include infringement, validity challenges, enforcement procedures, and remedies for each of the three jurisdictions.

Library of Congress Subject Heading Authorities in the Hollis Library Catalog

I also wanted to use this post to discuss searching the Hollis library catalog ( using subject keywords. This can be a good method for finding comparative law materials in the law library collection, not only in English but in other languages as well.

The law library’s catalogers use Library of Congress Subject Authority Headings ( when they catalog our library materials. Because they represent a controlled vocabulary, using LOC Subject Authority Headings in your subject keyword searches will help you find materials on the subject you specify regardless of what language the materials themselves are written in.

For example, you can search Hollis using these subject keywords:

patent laws germany japan

There are seven results for this search, four in English, one in German, and two in Japanese. The Hollis results screen is shown below.

Hollis Catalog Search Results Screen, Search is Subject Keywords: patent laws germany japan


In the Hollis record itself, each subject heading authority is hyperlinked. Click a link to find additional materials to which that subject heading authority was specifically assigned.

Hollis record with green box around hyperlinked subject heading authorities.


As you are learning how to use Hollis, you may want to experiment with searching by subject. You may find that your searches are more precise, and your search results more relevant, than using general keywords alone.

Please visit if you need help from a research librarian on searching Hollis or any other aspect of law library research.

You’re invited to Love Your Library Fest on September 23

HLS Students: we invite you to join us for the 12th annual Love Your Library Fest on Friday, September 23 from 2 to 5pm to learn more about your new library!

At Library Fest you will:

  • Learn about library services that students love
  • Get the scoop on how our Library Innovation Lab is making the law more accessible
  • Tell us how to improve our website
  • See unique items from our Historical & Special Collections
  • Meet our legal information vendors and staff from other Harvard libraries
Library Fest Heart by Alethea Jones

Art by Alethea Jones

Visit three or more stations to get a free movie ticket (HLS students only; one ticket per student) and for each station you visit, get an entry into our raffle for a Taste of New England gift basket (two each for JD and LLM/SJD students)–with a bonus raffle entry if you visit all stations! 10 additional HLS students will also win HLS Library book lamps for late-night reading.

In addition to the grand prizes, there will be candy, fortunes, treats, and other swag!

Mark your calendars and we’ll see you there!

Caselaw Access Project

The Harvard Law School Library is pleased to announce “Caselaw Access Project” as the formal name for its long-running project to help make U.S. state and federal court decisions freely accessible online.

The Library began this project internally in 2013 under the name “Free the Law” as a pilot to explore the feasibility and viability of digitizing its nearly comprehensive collection of over 42,000 bound volumes of published court decisions. In 2015, the Library publicly announced the initiative and its unique partnership with Ravel Law, a legal research and analytics platform, to transform and provide free public access to the millions of court decisions within these volumes.

Over the past few months, we have had the privilege to work closely with Mike Lissner of Free Law Project, a non-profit working to provide high-quality legal data to researchers, journalists and organizations. Working with Mike, we have begun exploring paths for collaboration between our projects to ensure that together we are making the greatest possible impact on the problem of access to legal information. Already we have exchanged many ideas and learned a great deal from each other. Our first, small collaborative step has been to share our respective databases of reporters. We hope and expect there will be more collaboration to come.  

Through our discussions with Mike, however, it has become evident that the similarity of our projects’ names has been a needless impediment. While our projects are similar in vision and values, they are distinct. They differ in important respects. While we continue to pursue avenues for collaboration, we are eager to prevent confusion or misunderstanding, and we believe publicly naming the Harvard-Ravel initiative the “Caselaw Access Project” will help us achieve that goal.