Announcements •

852 RARE: New Acquisition with Strong Ties to Harvard Law

The Harvard Law School Library is pleased to announce this recent acquisition, a chair with a unique provenance story and strong ties to the Harvard Law School. This adjustable back armchair, commonly referred to as a Morris chair, was first owned by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and used in his summer home in Beverly Farms, Massachusetts. The chair was included in a 1935 appraisal of Holmes’ personal property in his Beverly Farms home, “Mahogany Morris Chair,” item 357. After his death, his nephew and niece Edward and Mary Stacy Holmes purchased the chair from his estate as part of a larger group of items paid for May 26, 1936. They gifted it to Felix and Marion Frankfurter in 1939, probably in honor of his appointment to the United States Supreme Court.

Holmes-Frankfurter-Howe-Mansfield chair
September 2014

Holmes-Frankfurter-Howe-Mansfield chair September 2014

Holmes-Frankfurter-Howe-Mansfield chair
September 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Holmes and Frankfurter met in 1912 and carried on a close friendship until Holmes’ death in 1935. Several years before his death, Holmes chose Frankfurter as his biographer. Part of their friendship included Frankfurter selecting Holmes’ secretary from the Harvard Law School’s graduating class; among those selected was Mark De Wolfe Howe. Howe served as Holmes’ secretary from 1933-1934 and later became Justice Holmes’ official biographer.

In a letter dated April 30, 1963, Frankfurter wrote to Howe: “One of the things that just crossed my mind is what disposition to make of the Holmes chair when the time comes to bow to the inevitable. . . . After some reflection and with Marion’s warm concurrence, I should like the Holmes chair to come to you when I can no longer occupy it, and the reason for this desire is because of the feeling the old gentleman had about you and particularly his feeling of gratitude to you.” The chair remained in Frankfurters possession until his death in February 1965. Later that year Frankfurter’s executor made arrangements to deliver the chair to Howe’s home.

John H. Mansfield seated in the chair in his Brookline residence Photo credit: Maria Luisa F. Mansfield

John H. Mansfield seated in the chair in his
Brookline residence
Photo credit: Maria Luisa F. Mansfield

Howe did not have much time with the chair, surviving Frankfurter by just two years. Howe’s daughters eventually gave the chair to Harvard Law School alumnus, professor, and former Frankfurter clerk John H. Mansfield. Mansfield had strong ties to both Frankfurter and Howe. In a 1963 letter to his secretary Elsie Douglas, Frankfurter named Mansfield as one of a few individuals “whom I deem wholly qualified to write my judicial biography.” Howe and Mansfield spent nine years together on the Harvard Law School faculty and like Holmes and Frankfurter carried on a close friendship. Mansfield greatly enjoyed the chair, sitting in it every day after work and explaining to visitors the story of the legal greats who sat in the chair before him.

All of the chair’s former owners were Harvard Law School alumni and faculty members so it is extremely fitting that the chair’s final home should be the Law School.

The chair is the gift of John Howard Mansfield and Maria Luisa F. Mansfield and can be viewed in the Caspersen Room, 4th floor, Harvard Law School Library.

 

Detail of plaques on the back of the chair

Detail of plaques on the back of the chair

Bestlaw – A New Tool That Aims to Make Westlaw Better

Bestlaw LogoUsers of WestlawNext will be happy to know that there is a new tool that might make your research just a little bit easier. A law student from the UC Berkeley School of Law has created a browser extension called Bestlaw that, in the words of their website, “add[s] the features Westlaw forgot.” Among these features are options for a more readable presentation of the text that removes extraneous menus and addition sources, the option to share the link to a document more seamlessly via email or social media, a feature that prevents you from getting signed off automatically, and tools for copying information about the case. Perhaps more interesting for many law students, one of the pieces of information that you can copy with a single click is the Bluebook citation for the document you are reading. Right now this feature only works for reported federal cases, but there are plans to extend it to other documents on Westlaw as well. While you should always check your citations and not rely on a third party to create them for you, initial tests of this feature produced correct citations.

Currently Bestlaw is only available as a browser extension for Chrome and it only works with Westlaw, but the website for the tool says that a Firefox version and features that will work with Lexis are also in the works. If you want to try it out, you the installation process requires only two clicks and if you decide you don’t like it, the website links to clear instructions for both disabling and removing it.

If you are interested in learning about other browser extensions that can help you make your research more efficient, stop by our training session on October 28th. For a full list of our technology training sessions, see our research training calendar.

Book Talk: Professor I. Glenn Cohen and Holly Fernandez Lynch: Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future, Wednesday, October 22 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to join a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of the launch of Professor I. Glenn Cohen and Holly Fernandez Lynch’s co-edited volume from the MIT Press, Human Subjects Research: Perspectives on the Future.

This edited volume stems from the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics 2012 annual conference, which brought together leading experts in a conversation about whether and how the current system of human subjects research regulation in the U.S. ought to change to fit evolving trends, fill substantial gaps, and respond to identified shortcomings.

Please join us for a discussion of the book, pending efforts to amend federal research regulations, and some of the biggest unresolved questions in this space.

Human Subjects Research Regulation Poster

“The current framework for the regulation of human subjects research emerged largely in reaction to the horrors of Nazi human experimentation, revealed at the Nuremburg trials, and the Tuskegee syphilis study, conducted by U.S. government researchers from 1932 to 1972. This framework, combining elements of paternalism with efforts to preserve individual autonomy, has remained fundamentally unchanged for decades. Yet, as this book documents, it has significant flaws—including its potential to burden important research, overprotect some subjects and inadequately protect others, generate inconsistent results, and lag behind developments in how research is conducted. Invigorated by the U.S. government’s first steps toward change in over twenty years, Human Subjects Research Regulation brings together the leading thinkers in this field from ethics, law, medicine, and public policy to discuss how to make the system better. The result is a collection of novel ideas—some incremental, some radical—for the future of research oversight and human subject protection.

After reviewing the history of U.S. research regulations, the contributors consider such topics as risk-based regulation; research involving vulnerable populations (including military personnel, children, and prisoners); the relationships among subjects, investigators, sponsors, and institutional review boards; privacy, especially regarding biospecimens and tissue banking; and the possibility of fundamental paradigm shifts.” MIT Press

 

Book talk panelists include:

I. Glenn Cohen

 

I. Glenn Cohen, J.D., Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School (co-editor);

 

Holly Fernandez Lynch

 

Holly Fernandez Lynch, J.D., M.Bioethics, Executive Director of the Petrie-Flom Center (co-editor);

 

barbara bierer

 

Barbara E. Bierer, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Harvard Catalyst; Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center at Harvard;

 

michelle 6[1]

 

Michelle N. Meyer, J.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of Bioethics Policy, Union Graduate College – Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai Bioethics Program.

 

Wednesday, October 22, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room.  (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Free and open to the public.  Lunch will be served.

New eResources at Harvard

The Harvard Library has an astounding amount of resources, with new titles coming in every day!  For help efficiently navigating it all, make a time to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

New resources at Harvard

Alabama Plant Atlas

Alabama, with over 4,000 species of native or naturalized pteridophytes and seed plants, is the fifth most floristically diverse state in the United States.  Learn more.

East View E-Books

Largest database of Russian language books.

Gallup Analytics

Access Gallup’s U.S. Daily tracking and World Poll data to compare residents’ responses region by region and nation by nation to questions on topics such as economic conditions and education.

Loeb Classical Library

The written treasures of the ancient Greek and Roman world “within the reach of all who care for the finer things in life.”

Met Opera On Demand

Get access to more than 500 Met performances!

New York Flora Atlas

Source of information for the distribution of plants within the state, as well as information on plant habitats, associated ecological communities, and taxonomy.

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Helping to make the elationship between archaeology and biblical studies to  elevate the interpretation of the biblical text through an elucidation of the lifeways of the ancient world.

Faculty Book Talk: Cass Sunstein’s Valuing Life: Humanizing the Regulatory State, Friday, October 10 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor Cass R. Sunstein’s recently published book, Valuing Life: Humanizing the Regulatory State.

Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard University, and is the author of several books, including, Simpler: The Future of Government (2013), with coauthor Richard H. Thaler, Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness (2008), and Why Nudge?: The Politics of Libertarian Paternalism (2014).

Sunstein Valuing Life

“The White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) is the United States’s regulatory overseer. In Valuing Life, Cass R. Sunstein draws on his firsthand experience as the Administrator of OIRA from 2009 to 2012 to argue that we can humanize regulation—and save lives in the process.

As OIRA Administrator, Sunstein helped oversee regulation in a broad variety of areas, including highway safety, health care, homeland security, immigration, energy, environmental protection, and education. This background allows him to describe OIRA and how it works—and how it can work better—from an on-the-ground perspective. Using real-world examples, many of them drawn from today’s headlines, Sunstein makes a compelling case for improving cost-benefit analysis, a longtime cornerstone of regulatory decision-making, and for taking account of variables that are hard to quantify, such as dignity and personal privacy. He also shows how regulatory decisions about health, safety, and life itself can benefit from taking into account behavioral and psychological research, including new findings about what scares us, and what does not. By better accounting for people’s fallibility, Sunstein argues, we can create regulation that is simultaneously more human and more likely to achieve its goals.

In this highly readable synthesis of insights from law, policy, economics, and psychology, Sunstein breaks down the intricacies of the regulatory system and offers a new way of thinking about regulation that incorporates human dignity– and an insistent focus on the consequences of our choices.” — University of Chicago Press Books

Book talk panelists include:

Professor John Coates, John F. Cogan, Jr. Professor of Law and Economics and
Research Director, Program on the Legal Profession, Harvard Law School;

Professor Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University, Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and Director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Friday, October 10, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School Library Caspersen Room in Langdell Hall. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Free and open to the public.  Lunch will be served.

“What happens when the world’s leading academic expert on regulation is plunked into the real world of government? Sunstein is that expert, and he was the regulatory boss of the US government from 2009 to 2012. Valuing Life describes both how Sunstein’s ideas about regulation influenced his tenure in government, and how his experiences in government have influenced his ideas about regulation. This immensely rewarding book, written in the humane, beautiful style that Sunstein is known for, should be read by everyone who cares about how our government works.” — Eric Posner, University of Chicago

“Written with clarity and elegance, this book explains how White House oversight of the federal regulatory state is conducted—both the procedures and the analytics. It is a must read for academics and practitioners interested in improving the quality of federal regulation.” — John D. Graham, Indiana University and former Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB

“An immensely insightful look at one of the least understood and most influential agencies in the government and the complex factors that it considers in helping to determine what is and isn’t subject to government regulation.“ — Carol Browner, distinguished senior fellow, Center for American Progress

“Sunstein, who served as Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) from 2009 to 2012, argues that government must always consider the impact of proposed regulation on human life. Sunstein describes how the OIRA actually works, explains the role of break-even analyses in government regulation, and explores how the government might account for risk to nonquantifiable goods, such as privacy. . . . overall this is a lucid book that sheds light on how the government reasons, and how it ought to reason, about the regulations that shape our everyday lives.” – Publishers Weekly

Library Fest reminder and grand prizes

The countdown to this year’s Love Your Library Fest is just two days!

We hope to see you on Friday from 2-5pm in the Library for activities, games, an exhibit, chances to meet some legal information vendors, candy, and learning a bit more about what the Library can do for you!

We just packed up this year’s grand prize gift baskets. We are raffling one for a JD student and one for an LLM or SJD student. Each basket contains:

  • hlslgiftbasket-smA Boston tea party mug with tea
  • Cranberry bog frogs candy
  • maple syrup
  • Wild Maine blueberry jam
  • Taza stone ground chocolate
  • A lobster finger puppet
  • A complete set of HLS Library bookmarks
  • An HLS Library magnet

And finally

  • a $100 Grafton Restaurant Group giftcard, good at Grafton Street, Park, Russell House Tavern, and Temple Bar restaurants

Get a raffle entry for each Library Fest station you complete and a bonus entry if you complete all five. Every HLS student who completes three of the five Library Fest stations will receive an AMC gold movie ticket. Other giveaways for all include candy, HLSL stylus-pen combos, stickers, magnets, and items from our vendors.

We look forward to seeing you all Friday!

New Exhibit: Life Beyond the Law

Historical & Special Collections is pleased to announce its new exhibit Life Beyond the Law: Exploring Student Life Outside the Harvard Law School Classroom is now on view in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall.

Graduate Div. Picnic, September 1977 by Joan Lebold Cohen; Volleyball game between Austin Hall and Littauer Center, April 1979. From the Photographs of Harvard Law School Students collection.

Graduate Div. Picnic, September 1977 by Joan Lebold Cohen; Volleyball game between Austin Hall and Littauer Center, April 1979. From the Photographs of Harvard Law School Students collection.

This exhibit examines the experiences of Harvard Law School students from the mid-1840s to the present. It focuses on life outside the classroom along the themes of off-campus activities, leisure and the arts, and athletics. Largely told in their own words, this exhibit gives a glimpse into the lives of individual students whose experiences are captured in letters to friends and family, personal diaries, student publications, and photographs.

Curated by Jane Kelly and Lesley Schoenfeld, Life Beyond the Law will be on view in the Caspersen Room 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM through December 12, 2014. A companion website to this exhibit can be found here.

Coming Soon! — Fall 2014 HLS Faculty Book Talk Series

RevisedPoster

Finding Records That Are No Longer in PACER

As some of you may have already heard, PACER, the online repository for records and filings from U.S. Federal Courts, recently removed documents from five courts in preparation for an update to the system. Though efforts are underway by some private organizations to find a way to make these documents publicly available again, this has left many PACER users concerned about how to find these documents (which included records from some high profile cases) in the meantime. If you find yourself looking for these documents, there are a couple of approaches you can take.

First, all Harvard Law School students have access to Bloomberg Law, which offers a helpful docket search feature. While it does not include records for all cases, its easy search interface and the fact that new records are added all the time makes it a good first source. To search for a docket, login into Bloomberg Law and click Litigation & Dockets in the top menu. Then select Search Dockets from the resulting drop down menu.

If you don’t find the record you need in Bloomberg Law, you can also visit the RECAP Archive. This free database collects federal court documents that are gathered by the RECAP browser extension. (You might also consider installing the extension yourself; it is available for both Chrome and Firefox). While the archive does not include all court records, it is growing all the time, so it is a good starting point for items not on PACER or Bloomberg Law.

If you find that the records aren’t available electronically, we have collected information about how to request materials from each of the courts that had items removed from PACER below:

If you are looking for further information on how to find court records and briefs, you can also refer to our research guide on the topic.

New eResources at Harvard

The Harvard Library has an astounding amount of resources, with new titles coming in every day!  For help efficiently navigating it all, make a time to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

New resources at Harvard for August 2014

American Consumer Culture, 1935-1965

Atlas of the flora of New England

Historical Garden Design Online

Nineteenth Century Collection Online, PARTS 1-12

Oxford Bibliographies – American Literature

PLI Discover PLUS

ProQuest Executive Branch Documents 1789-1932

ProQuest U.S. Serial Set Digital Collection I: 1789-1969

Swiss Law Bibliography

Urban History Documentation Archive of the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta (CSSSC)

The Virgil Encyclopedia