Announcements •

Summer research help and roof project

As previously mentioned, the Library is getting a new roof this year. This is very exciting news and will be wonderful when it is finished. Preparation for construction is in full swing at the north and south ends of Langdell Hall and Areeda Hall.

research librariansBecause we expect there to be some noise, the research librarians will be summering at the Circulation Desk, around the corner nearest the Lemann Lounge. Bring us your research questions, challenging or mundane, and we will get them answered in this new location. We’ll be available our usual summer hours of Monday through Friday, 9am to 5pm. After hours, check our Ask a Librarian site for frequently asked library and research questions with answers as well as additional ways to contact us.

A few more things to know about the roof project and noise mitigation efforts:

  • Construction hours will generally be Monday through Saturday, 7am to 3pm, but may vary due to weather and other circumstances
  • Over the summer most noise will occur over the Langdell North and South classrooms and Areeda Hall. We do not expect the Reading Room to be impacted during the summer.
  • As there will be large cranes and equipment moving around, paths may periodically be blocked requiring the use of alternate routes.
  • A limited number of noise-canceling headphones are available for check out at the Circulation Desk.
  • Earplugs are available at both the circulation and reference desks.

Go On A Blind Date With A Book!

BlindDateWithABookThis summer, the Harvard Law School Library Historical & Special Collections Department’s latest exhibit, “It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester … Portrayals of Harvard Law School in Literature,” is on display in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall. This exhibit highlights prominent examples of literature that reflects or is inspired by Harvard Law School. In conjunction with this exhibit, the library is also offering two ways for visitors to get involved. The first is our “Blind Date with a Book” program that encourages visitors to take a deeper dive into this literature and the second is our online display, which offers everyone a chance to contribute to our list of titles that include depictions of HLS students, faculty, alumni, or the campus itself.

In this post, Carli Spina explains a bit about these interactive components of the exhibit:

1. So what exactly is “Blind Date with a Book”?

In “Blind Date with a Book” programs, books are wrapped in plain paper to hide their titles and authors and a brief description of the book is written on the front. The descriptions focus on who might like the book and the genre and visitors are encouraged to pick a book that sounds appealing without seeing the cover or reading the synopsis. You won’t know exactly what you have until you stop by the Circulation Desk to check the book out. The goal is to encourage people to branch out into new authors and genres that go beyond their normal reading patterns. Hopefully you’ll find a book that you never would have picked up before!

2. What about this exhibit made you want to bring the program to HLSL?

Ever since I read about other libraries hosting “Blind Date with a Book” programs, I’ve wanted to bring it to HLSL. I think most of our visitors focus on Harvard’s academic collections, but HLSL and the other library’s at Harvard University also have an impressive collection of other books including ranging from mysteries, to thrillers, to graphic novels, and memoirs. With its focus on depictions of Harvard Law School across literary genres, this exhibit was the perfect opportunity to highlight this diversity. Hopefully this exhibit will introduce visitors to some of these other materials that they might not have considered in the past.

3. What types of books will I find on the “Blind Date with a Book” cart?

We’ve tried to include something for everyone on the cart. You might pick up a graphic novel, a memoir, a romance, or a historical novel. Part of the fun is not knowing exactly what you will find, but rest assured that the cart offers a wide variety of options to appeal to all tastes. The only certainty is that the book you select will have a connection to Harvard Law School.

4. Can you talk a little bit about the exhibit’s virtual components? 

In addition to the “Blind Date with a Book” cart, the exhibit also has two virtual components. First, there is a the exhibit website, which will tell you more about portrayals of Harvard Law School in literature even if you aren’t able to visit the exhibit in person. In addition, we have also created a virtual display that shows books featuring Harvard Law School that weren’t included in the exhibit. Best of all, anyone can submit other books to be added to this display, so that we can learn about books we may have overlooked!

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 10.40.07 AM

The cart is available in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall during normal exhibit hours. Stop by to find a new summer read!

852 RARE: Of Butchers, Bakers, and Cordwainers

Among the appeals of older books and manuscripts are the fascinating glimpses they may provide into earlier times and their inhabitants. Recently a slim volume in a plain, nondescript binding crossed my desk. The title was in typically long eighteenth century style but straight-forward: A copy of the poll, taken the eighth day of September … 1780 at the Guildhall, in the Borough of New Windsor … at an election of two representatives to serve in the ensuing Parliament … . The poll in the title refers to a fifteen page alphabetical list of voters (only men, of course) and their occupations. This seemingly straightforward list provided an unexpected glimpse of life in a late eighteenth century English town, as well as a wealth of information about its residents.

TpThe town of New Windsor (now known simply as Windsor), 23 miles west of London, was a “free borough” and during the Middle Ages one of the fifty wealthiest English towns. After a period of decline it experienced a revival when George III began renovations to the castle there in the late 1770s. The town’s growth seems to be reflected in the 1780 poll, which shows a significant number of citizens in the construction trades: carpenters, bricklayers, glaziers, painters, and stone masons, among others. The list reveals that the town was sophisticated enough to support a perfumer (Robert Calley), a jeweler (John Snow) and a watchmaker (James Turlis) and had enough overnight visitors to keep at least four “innholders” in business. The poll also reveals broad class and economic divisions, listing several labourers, along with several gentlemen. Adcock

The occupation of the very first citizen—Thomas Adcock, staymaker— sounds delightfully archaic to a modern reader. Yet there were at least three of them in New Windsor in 1780. How many staymakers are there anywhere now? Or, how many coopers, horsebreakers, rabbit sellers, cordwainers, soap boilers, collar makers, peruke makers, or tripemen? How many of today’s occupations will sound delightfully quaint (or mystifying) 235 years from now?

 

 

 

On the other hand, most of the occupations in the list are recognizable, even if the vocabulary has changed, and show how the necessities of life were filled for New Windsor’s residents. HsThere were several victuallers, shopkeepers, shoemakers, higlers, “taylors”, and bakers, and at least two butchers, a cheese-monger, fishmonger, brewer,  a physician, an apothecary, tea dealer, and a milkman. Among the town’s inhabitants were at least five attorneys and a gaoler (jailer), as well as a number of family businesses: Joseph and William Cantrell (bakers) and Henry and William Coombs (ironmongers). Of course, death and taxes are always with us, as they were for the people of New Windsor, verified by the occupations of Edward Edwards (collector of excise) and Charles Jarman (taylor and undertaker).

This seemingly unremarkable 1780 poll list reminds us that such routine documents are anything but dull and may, in fact, be rich resources for historical and genealogical research.

20th edition of the Bluebook: including Perma.cc!

Great news from the Perma.cc mailing list!

The 20th Edition of The Bluebook is now available and includes a new rule: 18.2.1(d), which states:

“Archiving of Internet sources is encouraged, but only when a reliable archival tool is available.  For citations to Internet sources, append the archive URL to the full citation in brackets” – the rule includes the following example:

Letter from Rose M. Oswald Poels, President/CEO, Wis. Bankers Ass’n, to Elizabeth M. Murphy, Sec’y, SEC (Sept. 17, 2013), http://www.sec.gov/comments/s7-03-13/s70313-178.pdf [http://perma.cc/B7Z7D9DJ].

Perma.cc is also the example used to demonstrate the archived sources rule in the Rule 18.1 Basic Citation Forms for Internet Sources table on page 178:

Rocio Gonzalez, Puerto Rico’s Status Debate Continues as Island Marks 61 Years as a Commonwealth, Huffington Post (July 25, 2013, 9:00 AM), http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/25/puerto-rico-status-debate_n_3651755.html [http://perma.cc/C6UP-96HN].

Our deepest thank you to the editors of The Bluebook for recognizing Perma.cc as a reliable tool for preserving internet sources, and thanks to all of you, our partners, for your continued support!

New e-resources

The Harvard Library has an astounding number of resources, with new titles coming in every day! For help efficiently navigating it all, make an appointment to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

Among our newest e-resources:

Note: “about” descriptions are taken from the resources themselves.

Afghanistan and the US, 1945-1963 : Records of US State Department Classified Files

About: Afghanistan’s history, internal political development, foreign relations, and very existence as an independent state have largely been determined by its geographic location at the crossroads of Central, West, and South Asia. In modern times, as well as in antiquity, vast armies of the world passed through Afghanistan, temporarily establishing local control and often dominating Iran and northern India. Islam has played a key role in the formation of Afghanistan as well. Although it was the scene of great empires and flourishing trade for over two millennia, Afghanistan did not become a truly independent nation until the twentieth century.

The U.S. State Department Central Classified Files are the definitive source of American diplomatic reporting on political, military, social, and economic developments throughout the world in the twentieth century.

This collection of U.S. State Department Central Classified Files relating to internal and foreign affairs contain a wide range of materials from U.S. diplomats, including special reports, studies and statistics, court proceedings, interviews, and meetings of minutes.

Afghanistan in 1919:  The Third Anglo-Afghan War

About: The Third Anglo-Afghan War began on 6 May 1919 and ended with an armistice on 8 August 1919. While it was essentially a minor tactical victory for the British in so much as they were able to repel the regular Afghan forces, in many ways it was a strategic victory for the Afghans. This collection of confidential correspondence, memoranda, orders, reports and other materials provide a broad spectrum of information on military policy and administration, including the organization, operations and equipment of the army during the war. Afghanistan has been called the “graveyard of empires” due to the negative experiences there by would-be British and Russian imperialists and now that the U.S. and NATO are embroiled in an enduring counter-insurgency campaign in that country themselves, a look at the mistakes of the past can prove edifying. This collection of India Office records provides an opportunity to assess the lessons learned by the British and apply them to the current situation.

American History, 1493-1945

About: This unique collection documents American History from the earliest settlers to the mid-twentieth century. It is sourced from the Gilder Lehrman Collection, one of the finest archives available for the study of American History.

Module I: Settlement, Commerce, Revolution and Reform: 1493-1859

Module II: (coming soon) Civil War, Reconstruction and the Modern Era: 1860-1945

Artemis Primary Sources

About: Gale Artemis is a path-breaking research experience that unites Gale’s globally acclaimed digital archives. Artemis Primary Sources allows researchers to uncover primary source documents in archives where they may not have thought to look, greatly enhancing their research experience. By building a seamless research environment for multiple collections, Gale is creating the largest digital humanities and social sciences collection in the world.

Starting with Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) and Nineteenth Century Collections Online (NCCO), Gale began to incorporate our primary source collections into Artemis Primary Sources, enabling researchers, teachers, and students to cross-search these collections and discover and analyze content in entirely new ways.

This program continues to expand, with the addition of the following products and series incorporated into Artemis Primary Sources, all in one integrated research environment:

  • Associated Press Collections Online series of archives
    Smithsonian Collections Online series of archives
    Indigenous Peoples: North America
    The Making of the Modern World
    The Making of Modern Law series of archives
    Sabin Americana
    Our historical newspaper vault

Digitalia Catalan

About: E-books and e-journals database where you will the best access to high quality content in Catalan language.

Thousands of books of the most prestigious publishers as well as the most relevant journals in different subjects.

Digitalia Portuguesa

About: Books of the most prestigious publishers and Portuguese universities, as well as the most relevant journals in different subjects.

The best access to high quality content in Portuguese.
DOCOMOMO Architecture routes
DOCOMOMO Documents
DOCOMOMO Registers database

About: La Fundación DOCOMOMO Ibérico elabora rutas de arquitectura sobre los edificios incluidos en sus registros. Se centran en una localidad o en un autor, e incluyen un plano guía, indicaciones de acceso, textos explicativos, fotografías, planimetría y otros recursos de interés.

The Iberian DOCOMOMO Foundation publishes these documents covering works included in the registers. In them are recent photographic reports on the buildings, images of the period, drawings and detailed bibliographies of the buildings.

Early American Imprints, Evans Supplement from the American Antiquarian Society, 1652-1800
Early American Imprints, Shaw-Shoemaker Supplement from the American Antiquarian Society, 1801-1819

About: includes almanacs, broadsides, chapbooks, elegies, imaginary letters, maps, poems, sermons, treaties, and more.

Early American Newspapers, Series 11

About: Based on the renowned holdings of the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), Series 11 provides online access to more than 130 titles from all 50 present states. Created for students and scholars in diverse academic disciplines, Series 11 offers new coverage of diverse facets U.S. history, culture and daily life, while significantly extending the political and geographical breadth and depth of the ten previous series. Among the titles in Series 11 are many of the better and more successful newspapers in each American region—publications that survived on their own merits after the first wave of less-popular titles in the region died out. Also included are elusive runs of especially noteworthy newspapers that have only recently become available.

European Colonialism in the Early 20th Century: Colonialism and Nationalism in the Dutch East Indies

About: The Dutch East Indies experienced the replacement of company rule by Dutch government rule and the complete transformation of Java into a colonial society and the successful extension of colonial rule to Sumatra and the eastern archipelago during the early 20th century. The boundaries of the modern state of Indonesia were defined during this time and the process of generally exploitative political, military, and economic integration began. This collection comprises correspondence, studies and reports, cables, maps, and other kinds of documents related to U.S. consular activities. U.S. Consulates were listening posts reporting on the activities of the Dutch colonial government and the activities of the native peoples. Includes 15,213 images covering 1910-1930.

Germanistick Online Datenbank

Germanistik, the leading international publication covering German Language and Literary Studies, is now available as online database. More than 50 years of German philology are searchable electronically. The history of the discipline – critically reviewed, systematized and keyworded – is accessible online in more than 60,000 abstracts and summaries. Altogether, approximately 350,000 monographic studies, collected volumes and journals from the areas of literature, theatre studies, media studies, cultural history, and linguistics are made accessible bibliographically.

The database will be continually expanded to include the current volume containing about 8,000 new entries and over 1,000 short papers. It provides a category-specific, full-text and detailed search and differentiated and convenient access to authors, editors, article and review writers, titles, papers, publication years and keywords. All relevant data are cross-linked. The online edition provides access to extensive subject coverage for every entered title with information on the content of the respective book or article.

Global Times  时报 newspaper 

India from Crown Rule to Republic, 1945-1949: Records of the U.S. State Department

About: Independent India’s first years were marked with turbulent events – partition, a massive exchange of population with Pakistan, the Indo-Pakistani War of 1947 and the integration of over 500 princely states to form a united nation. This collection identifies the key issues, individuals, and events in the history of the Subcontinent between 1945 and 1949, and places them in the context of the complex and dynamic regional strategic, political, and economic processes that have fashioned India in the postwar period.

The Indian Army and Colonial Warfare on the Frontiers of India, 1914-1920

About: For generations of British and Indian Officers and men, the North-West Frontier was the scene of repeated skirmishes and major campaigns against the trans-border Pathan tribes who inhabited the mountainous no-man’s land between India and Afghanistan. This collection contains Army Lists; Orders; Instructions; Regulations; Acts; Manuals; Strength Returns; Orders of Battle; Administration Summaries; organization, commissions, committees, reports, maneuvers; departments of the Indian Army; and regimental narratives. This collection is a welcome addition to the new-flourishing literature on the military history of South Asia and the growing field of serious study of the British military experience in India.

India-Pakistan Conflict: Records of the U.S. State Department, February 1963-1966

About: Over 16,000 pages of State Department Central Files on India and Pakistan from 1963 through 1966 make this collection a standard documentary resource for the study of the political relations between India and Pakistan during a crucial period in the Cold War and the shifting alliances and alignments in South Asia.        

Late Qing Dynasty Periodical Full-text Database (1833-1911)  晚清期刊全文數據庫

About: It covers around 280,000 pieces of historical documents from 302 periodicals published during 1833~1911. The extensive collection has covered almost all the periodicals published during such critical periods later known as the Opium Wars, Westernization Movement, Reform Movement of 1898 and Revolution of 1911. It contains the Women’s Periodicals that advocated women’s liberation and mental enlightenment, the Four Major Late Qing Dynasty Novel Journals as emerged during the great flourishing period of novels of the late Qing Dynasty, the Vernacular Chinese Periodicals founded to explore the people’s mind and spread new knowledge, and the Science and Technology Periodicals which introduced new technologies and spread scientific knowledge. The search terms of the database include title, author and periodical, etc. Users may have access to some 280,000 pieces of historical documents and browse or download them in full text.

Making of the Modern World Part 2

About: With approximately 5,000 titles, this collection takes The Making of Modern World series into the early 20th century.  Comprised mainly of monographs, reports, correspondence, speeches, and surveys, this collection broadens Gale’s international coverage of social, economic, and business history, as well as political science, technology, industrialization and the birth of the modern corporation.

Researchers of world history, political science, philosophy, business/economics, law, and women’s studies, this collection provides a unique and in-depth view into the late half of the 19th century world.

Cross-searchable with the first installment of The Making of the Modern World series, this collection, combined with Part I, will provide access to 450 years of world history.

Nietzsche Online

About: The database Nietzsche Online provides researchers and readers complete online access to the editions, interpretations and reference works on one of the most important philosophers. Users thus obtain access to a comprehensive database containing the research results of the last forty years. In addition to the authoritative editions of the works (KGW) and the letters (KGB), Nietzsche Online contains all De Gruyter publications on Nietzsche. Due to the cross-referencing to the full texts and the further interpretations, the headwords of the Nietzsche dictionary have become an even more indispensable basis for the research and understanding of Nietzsche’s work.

Romanische Bibliographie Online

About: The online version of  Romance Studies Bibliography, the only comprehensive specialist bibliography for this discipline, provides electronic access to the approximate 460,000 entries of the volumes 1965–2013, categorized according to the tried-and-tested structure tree (system key). Approximately 10,000 new entries will be added on a continuous basis every year.

The database features a category-specific and detailed search with differentiated and convenient access to the authors, editors, article and review writers, titles, publication years, keywords, and system keys.

Sukarno and the Army-PKI Rivalry in the Years of Living Dangerously, 1960-1963

About: The records in this collection cover the internal and foreign policies, personalities, and events in a pivotal period of Indonesian history. The charismatic leader of Indonesia, Achmed Sukarno, steered his country between the political machinations of the Army Staff and the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI). These records consist of essential memoranda, correspondence, telegrams, memoranda of conversations, reports, and news articles and cover all aspects of U.S. relations with Indonesia, Indonesian internal affairs, and Indonesia’s relations with its neighbors.     

Very Short Introductions Online

About: Launched by Oxford University Press in 1995, Very Short Introductions offer concise introductions to a diverse range of subject areas from Climate to Consciousness, Game Theory to Ancient Warfare, Privacy to Islamic History, Economics to Literary Theory. [Note: it also includes a few legal topics!]

Since the series was launched it has continued to offer new books each year for students and scholars, and the avidly curious, offering a bridge between reference content and higher academic work. All titles provide intelligent and serious introductions to a huge range of subjects, written by experts in the field who combine facts, analysis, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make challenging topics highly readable.

Vossische Zeitung Online, 1918-1934

About: The Vossische Zeitung is one of the most outstanding sources for the study of political reporting and public opinion in Germany. The Vossische Zeitung Online. 1918 – 1934 database contains every issue of the Berlin daily newspaper from the end of World War I to the beginning of the “Third Reich” with all of the newspaper’s coverage and commentaries on the political, social and cultural events of that epoch.

The database contains approx. 10,500 issues with more than 127,000 pages, spanning the period from 1918 until 1934.

You can also view our list of recently activated e-journals.

White paper examines new attorney readiness for real world practice

LexisNexis recently released a white paper about a study of 300 hiring partners and senior associates in law firms about what skills were most desired in new lawyers.  Although they agree that new lawyers have mastered basic legal research skills, 95% of respondents believe recent law grads lack key practical skills to jump right in and help with client matters.  Practical skills needed include the ability to “understand fundamental business and financial concepts, conduct due diligence, find forms/checklists, draft simple contracts and agreements, and locate company information.”

The paper states that most young associates spend between 40% and 60% of their time conducting legal research, yet respondents feel  advanced legal research skills were typically lacking among new associates.

Below is the executive summary with links to the full report, (as reported on llb2.com).

Executive Summary

Law Schools and individual faculty are in the process of revising their curriculum and classes to address the demand for more practice-ready graduates. But what are the most desired research, writing and transactional skills and how can law schools develop these skills most effectively? An independent survey was conducted by 5 Square Research, Inc. and funded by LexisNexis®, to answer these questions and more.

The result is a new white paper, Hiring partners reveal new attorney readiness for real world practice, which shares the responses of 300 hiring partners and associates from small to large law firms practicing in litigation and transactional law.

Key findings include:

  • 96% believe that newly graduated law students lack practical skills related to litigation and transactional practice.
  • 66% deem writing and drafting skills highly important with emphasis on motions, briefs and pleadings
  • Newer attorneys spend 40% – 60% of their time conducting legal research
  • 88% of hiring partners think proficiency using “paid for” research services is highly important
  • Students lack advanced legal research skills in the areas of statutory law, regulations, legislation and more…
  • The most important transactional skills include business and financial concepts, due diligence, drafting contracts and more…
  • A law firm spends approximately $19,000 per year, on average, to train a new associate

This study reveals the most important and most lacking practical skills desired by legal employers and will help inform law schools of the specific content and tasks they can integrate into applicable classes and experiential learning programs pursuant to employer demand and the new ABA standards.

Read the full article with charts, Hiring partners reveal new attorney readiness for real world practice, or view this Executive Overview Prezi*.

 

BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In the Age of Google with author John Palfrey

John Palfrey image

BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google

with author John Palfrey

Monday, June 22, 2015 at 6:00 pm
Harvard Law School
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East
RSVP required for those attending in person 
Reception immediately following Book Talk

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

BiblioTech by John Palfrey

John Palfrey will discuss his new book, BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google.  He argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online.  Libraries play a crucial role in making these skills and information available — and yet are at risk. In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible—by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online, while continuing to play the vital role as public spaces in our democracy that they have for hundreds of years.

About John

John is the Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover.  He serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Knight Foundation and President of the Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America.  He also serves as a director of the Data + Society Research Institute.

John’s research and teaching focus on new media and learning.  He has written extensively on Internet law, intellectual property, and the potential of new technologies to strengthen democracies locally and around the world.  He is the author or co-author of several books, including BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google (Basic Books, 2015); Interop: The Promise and Perils of Highly Interconnected Systems (Basic Books, 2012) (with Urs Gasser); Intellectual Property Strategy (MIT Press, 2012); Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives (Basic Books, 2008) (with Urs Gasser); and Access Denied: The Practice and Politics of Global Internet Filtering (MIT Press, 2008).

John served previously as the Henry N. Ess III Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School.  He is a director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, where he was executive director from 2002-2008. John came back to the Harvard Law School from the law firm Ropes & Gray, where he worked on intellectual property, Internet law, and private equity transactions. He also served as a Special Assistant at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton administration.  He previously served as a venture executive at Highland Capital Partners and on the Board of Directors of the Mass2020 Foundation, the Ames Foundation, and Open Knowledge Commons, among others.  John was a Visiting Professor of Information Law and Policy at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland for the 2007-2008 academic year.

John graduated from Harvard College, the University of Cambridge, and Harvard Law School.  He was a Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholar to the University of Cambridge and the U.S. EPA Gold Medal (highest national award).

 

New Library Exhibit: It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester … Portrayals of Harvard Law School in Literature

Historical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that its new exhibit, “It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester … Portrayals of Harvard Law School in Literature” is now on display in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall.

It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester ...

 

This exhibit seeks to highlight the role of Harvard Law School in fiction, whether the law school serves as the scene, the featured characters are law school graduates, or even when the law school has inspired its students to become novelists during their JD studies.

Curated by Claire DeMarco and Ed Moloy, it will be on view in the Caspersen Room 9:00 am to 5:00 pm through  August 14, 2015.

All about the HLS Faculty Portrait Collection

Simon Greenleaf portrait

Simon Greenleaf portrait by George Peter Alexander Healy, 1848, olvwork724100.

If you’ve enjoyed the collection of Harvard Law School Faculty Portraits Collection–either the paintings in the Library or the black and white photos formerly in Pound and now located in the WCC–you may enjoy learning more about the history of the collection. Harvard Law Today has a great article about it with a short video featuring Professor Wilkins and the Library’s own Lesley Schoenfeld, Public Services And Visual Collections Coordinator in Historical & Special Collections.

Student-Curated Exhibit “By Popular Demand” Now on View

Recently, we gave HLS students a list of some of our favorite items from Historical & Special Collections’ extensive holdings of rare books, early manuscripts, faculty papers, photographs, and art objects. We asked them to select their favorites, and the results are on view in the library’s Caspersen Room.

Photo collage of items in student-curated exhibit
The top five choices include:

  • Letter from Charles Evans Hughes to Learned Hand reminiscing about Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr..
  • HLS student admission photos of several current HLS faculty.
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg Two Ways: 1957-1958 photograph of the Harvard Law Review Board of Editors featuring a young Ginsburg, and the 2012 RBG bobblehead.
  • First edition of The Bluebook, 1926.
  • Glanville, a 12th-century English legal treatise. Our copy was written on a parchment scroll around 1300.

The exhibit was curated by HSC staff members Karen Beck, Jane Kelly, Ed Moloy, Margaret Peachy, Mary Person, Lesley Schoenfeld … and all the HLS students who cast their votes! It will remain on view through summer 2015.

Be sure to check out highlights from Historical & Special Collections’ other exhibits over at Exhibit Addenda!