Announcements •

Special Event: Jonathan Zittrain Interviews Lawrence Lessig: “What I Learned Running for President:  The Ethics of Citizenship,” Mon., Nov. 23rd at 5 pm

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend an interview of Professor Lawrence Lessig by Professor Jonathan Zittrain entitled, What I Learned Running for President:  The Ethics of Citizenship.  Professor Lessig recently ended his presidential campaign with the release of a YouTube video with the title,  The Democrats have changed the rules This special event also celebrates the 2016 edition of Professor Lessig’s book titled Republic Lost: The Corruption of Equality and the Steps to End It  (Oct. 2015, Grand Central Publishing, Hachette Book Group).

Monday, November 23, 2015 at 5:00 pm followed by a 6:00 pm reception 


Harvard Law School Ames Courtroom, Austin Hall (Directions)


1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Co-sponsored by the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University

Lessig poster

 

Lawrence LessigLawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and was formerly the Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, Lessig was a professor at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and at the University of Chicago. He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court. Lessig serves on the Board of Creative Commons, MAPLight, Brave New Film Foundation, The American Academy, Berlin, AXA Research Fund and iCommons.org, and is on the advisory board of the Sunlight Foundation. He is a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Association, and has received numerous awards, including the Free Software Foundation’s Freedom Award, Fastcase 50 Award and being named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries. Lessig holds a BA in economics and a BS in management from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA in philosophy from Cambridge, and a JD from Yale.

Jonathan ZittrainJonathan Zittrain is the George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Director of the Harvard Law School Library, and Faculty Director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.  His research interests include battles for control of digital property and content, cryptography, electronic privacy, the roles of intermediaries within Internet architecture, human computing, and the useful and unobtrusive deployment of technology in education.

He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Board of Advisors for Scientific American.  He has served as a Trustee of the Internet Society, and as a Forum Fellow of the World Economic Forum, which named him a Young Global Leader, and as Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the Federal Communications Commission, where he previously chaired the Open Internet Advisory Committee. His book The Future of the Internet — And How to Stop It is available from Yale University Press and Penguin UK — and under a Creative Commons license.

More about Republic Lost: The Corruption of Equality and the Steps to End It

“In an era when special interests funnel huge amounts of money into our government-driven by shifts in campaign-finance rules and brought to new levels by the Supreme Court in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission-trust in our government has reached an all-time low. More than ever before, Americans believe that money buys results in Congress, and that business interests wield control over our legislature.

With heartfelt urgency and a keen desire for righting wrongs, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig takes a clear-eyed look at how we arrived at this crisis: how fundamentally good people, with good intentions, have allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests, and how this exploitation has become entrenched in the system. Rejecting simple labels and reductive logic-and instead using examples that resonate as powerfully on the Right as on the Left-Lessig seeks out the root causes of our situation. He plumbs the issues of campaign financing and corporate lobbying, revealing the human faces and follies that have allowed corruption to take such a foothold in our system. He puts the issues in terms that nonwonks can understand, using real-world analogies and real human stories. And ultimately he calls for widespread mobilization and a new Constitutional Convention, presenting achievable solutions for regaining control of our corrupted-but redeemable-representational system. In this way, Lessig plots a roadmap for returning our republic to its intended greatness.

While America may be divided, Lessig vividly champions the idea that we can succeed if we accept that corruption is our common enemy and that we must find a way to fight against it. In “Republic Lost,” he not only makes this need palpable and clear-he gives us the practical and intellectual tools to do something about it.” — Hachette Book Group

Jump Start Your Research With Our New Tool

The Harvard Law School Library recently launched a new tool to streamline your research. You can now run a single search to find research guides, items from the library’s catalog, responses to frequently asked questions, and databases that are recommended by the HLSL research librarians. If your search doesn’t return any results, you will be offered the opportunity to contact a librarian to get further help with your research. You can see the new tool in action in the video below.

You can find a link to this new tool on the library’s homepage under Research A Topic. We hope this will help to make your research faster and smoother, but if you encounter any issues, please feel free to let us know!

Faculty Book Talk: Cass R. Sunstein’s “Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice,” Wed., Nov. 18 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Cass R. Sunstein’s recently published book, Choosing Not to Choose:  Understanding the Value of Choice (Oxford University Press).

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 12:00 noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein West A  (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

sunstein -- choosing not to choose

Cass R. Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations.

Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014) and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014). He is now working on group decisionmaking and various projects on the idea of liberty

Panelists:

David Laibson

 

 

David Laibson, Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics, Harvard University

 

 

Mark Tushnet

 

 

 

Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law

 

 

“Our ability to make choices is fundamental to our sense of ourselves as human beings, and essential to the political values of freedom-protecting nations. Whom we love; where we work; how we spend our time; what we buy; such choices define us in the eyes of ourselves and others, and much blood and ink has been spilt to establish and protect our rights to make them freely.

Choice can also be a burden. Our cognitive capacity to research and make the best decisions is limited, so every active choice comes at a cost. In modern life the requirement to make active choices can often be overwhelming. So, across broad areas of our lives, from health plans to energy suppliers, many of us choose not to choose. By following our default options, we save ourselves the costs of making active choices. By setting those options, governments and corporations dictate the outcomes for when we decide by default. This is among the most significant ways in which they effect social change, yet we are just beginning to understand the power and impact of default rules. Many central questions remain unanswered: When should governments set such defaults, and when should they insist on active choices? How should such defaults be made? What makes some defaults successful while others fail?

Cass R. Sunstein has long been at the forefront of developing public policy and regulation to use government power to encourage people to make better decisions. In this major new book, Choosing Not to Choose, he presents his most complete argument yet for how we should understand the value of choice, and when and how we should enable people to choose not to choose.

The onset of big data gives corporations and governments the power to make ever more sophisticated decisions on our behalf, defaulting us to buy the goods we predictably want, or vote for the parties and policies we predictably support. As consumers we are starting to embrace the benefits this can bring. But should we? What will be the long-term effects of limiting our active choices on our agency? And can such personalized defaults be imported from the marketplace to politics and the law? Confronting the challenging future of data-driven decision-making, Sunstein presents a manifesto for how personalized defaults should be used to enhance, rather than restrict, our freedom and well-being.” — Oxford University Press

Recent Reviews:  

“This book will profoundly alter the way you think about choices; the choices you make for yourself, the choices you make for others and the choices you allow others to make for you. With talent and ease Sunstein draws from politics, psychology, economics to help us understand ourselves and the world we live in, and how we may improve both. A delightful, thought provoking, read.” — Tali Sharot, Associate Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College, London

“From health care, education, and privacy, to travel, food, and finance, we face increasing arrays of choices. Occasionally, we have the knowledge and the bandwidth to choose well. Often, we do not. When are choices liberating, and bound to improve well-being? And when is it better not to choose? Should we worry about paternalism when others choose for us? And when we prefer not to choose, might it be paternalistic to require that we do so? Sunstein masterfully blends economic, legal, philosophical, and behavioral considerations to illuminate a topic of tremendous importance to policy making and to everyday life. Anyone who cares about the choices that they make should choose to read this book!” — Eldar Shafir, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, Princeton University

“There is no-one better placed than Cass Sunstein to make the case for Choosing Not to Choose. Drawing on the author’s own influential research and that of other experts, this book provides a deeply insightful exploration of both the value of choice and of not choosing. It is a must read for anyone interested in personal freedom and human wellbeing.” — Paul Dolan, Professor of Behavioral Science, The London School of Economics and Political Science

“In Choosing Not to Choose, Cass Sunstein provides the best analysis to date of the pros and cons of decision by default, making a strong case for personalized default rules in many domains. Readers will particularly appreciate the near-encyclopedic survey of empirical findings to help them identify the arenas of social life in which they will be better off or worse off by delegating decisions.” — Jon Elster, Robert K. Merton Professor of Social Science, Columbia University

“This monumental volume is the authoritative source on the subject. As anthropogenic climate change puts a deeper stamp on the planet, this book’s significance is certain to rise.” –– Jim Chen, Jurisdynamics Blog

Faculty Book Talk: Mark Tushnet’s “Unstable Constitutionalism: Law and Politics in South Asia,” Mon., Nov. 16 at 4 pm

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Mark Tushnet’s recently published book with co-editor Madhav Khosla, Unstable Constitutionalism: Law and Politics in South Asia (Cambridge University Press).

Monday, November 16, 2015 at 4:00 pm
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2009
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge  (Directions)

Refreshments will be served.  Co-sponsored with the South Asia Institute at Harvard University.

Tushnet -- Unstable Constitutionalism

 

Mark Tushnet is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.  He graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School and served as a law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall.  His research includes studies examining (skeptically) the practice of judicial review in the United States and around the world. He also writes in the area of legal and particularly constitutional history, with works on the development of civil rights law in the United States and (currently) a long-term project on the history of the Supreme Court in the 1930s.  His important works in the field of comparative constitutional law include Advanced Introduction to Comparative Constitutional Law (2014), The Routledge Handbook of Constitutional Law (co-edited, 2012) and the leading handbook, Weak Courts, Strong Rights: Judicial Review and Social Welfare Rights in Comparative Constitutional Law (2009).

Madhav Khosla is currently a PhD candidate at the Department of Government at Harvard University. He is the author of The Indian Constitution (2012) and is currently co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Indian Constitutional Law.

Panelists

Rohit De -- Yale

 

 

Rohit De, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Yale University and Research Scholar in Law, Yale Law School

 

Nichcolas Robinson -- Harvard

 

 

 

Nicholas Robinson, Resident Fellow, Harvard Law School Center on the Legal Profession

 

“Although the field of constitutional law has become increasingly comparative in recent years, its geographic focus has remained limited. South Asia, despite being the site of the world’s largest democracy and a vibrant if turbulent constitutionalism, is one of the important neglected regions within the field. This book remedies this lack of attention by providing a detailed examination of constitutional law and practice in five South Asian countries: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Identifying a common theme of volatile change, it develops the concept of “unstable constitutionalism,” studying the sources of instability alongside reactions and responses to it. By highlighting unique theoretical and practical questions in an underrepresented region, Unstable Constitutionalism constitutes an important step toward truly global constitutional scholarship.” — Cambridge University Press

Free the Law – Overview

Project Summary

Problem: Our common law is not freely accessible online. This lack of access to the law impairs justice and equality and stifles innovation.

Goal: Transform the official print versions of all historical U.S. court decisions into digital files made freely accessible online. Encourage and assist federal and state courts in making all prospective court decisions freely accessible online.

Scope:

  • All official reported decisions of the federal courts
  • All official reported decisions of the courts of every state
  • All territorial and pre-statehood decisions in HLSL’s collection
  • Estimated 43,000 volumes and 40MM pages

Process:

  1. Get the books from HLSL or Harvard Depository
  2. Scan the books using a high-speed scanner (~450K pages per week)
  3. Preserve the books in long-term underground storage
  4. Convert the scanned images into machine-readable text files
  5. Extract the individual cases into individual text files
  6. Redact headnotes and other editorial content
  7. Make the redacted images and text files freely accessible online

Projected Timeline:

  • 2015: Ramp up digitization production
  • 2016 (projected): digitize 25MM-30MM pp → publish CA, NY, MA, IL, TX, Federal
  • 2017 (projected): digitize remaining 10MM-15MM pp → publish everything

Harvard – Ravel Agreement – Key Terms

Funding:

  • Ravel pays total costs of digitization

Digitization Responsibilities:

  • Harvard responsible for scanning books
  • Ravel (via vendor) responsible for converting scanned images to text files

Data Ownership and License:

  • Harvard owns the resulting data
  • Ravel gets a temporary exclusive license to commercially exploit redacted files
    • Maximum duration of exclusive commercial license is 8 years
    • Early expiration of exclusive commercial license if:
      • Ravel does not meet its obligations
      • a given jurisdiction publishes its future court decisions online in an acceptable format. Illinois and Arkansas have already satisfied this condition.

Data Access Rights and Obligations:

  • Harvard
    • Harvard may provide anyone with public access to the redacted files, subject to a bulk access limitation
    • Harvard may provide Harvard community members and outside research scholars with free bulk access to the entire dataset, provided they accept contractual prohibitions on redistribution
  • Ravel
    • Ravel will provide ongoing free public access to the redacted files, subject to a bulk access limitation
    • Ravel will provide developers ongoing API access to the redacted files
      • Free access for non-profit developers
      • Paid access for for-profit developers

Other Notable Terms:

  • Harvard has a 4% equity interest in Ravel, with any proceeds going to a sustainability fund to support the project.
  • Should Ravel stop offering public access, Harvard will be able to do so with the necessary Ravel software.

 

Research Week–part 2!

Don’t forget–this week is Research Week! The HLS librarians are offering a week of classes on different research topics. Click through for descriptions for this week’s offerings and to sign up–or feel free to just show up. All include snacks or lunch.

But this isn’t the only chance–we’ll be offering a second round of classes in November! Sign up for any and all sessions that interest you at the links below–or feel free to just show up. Again, we’ll be offering snacks or lunch at all sessions.

Criminal Justice Research
Tuesday, November 17, 2015, 4:00pm – 4:45pm
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Michelle Pearse, Senior Research Librarian
Interested in Criminal Justice? Attend a training designed to help you find relevant books, articles, videos and other materials.
Register now

Finding Data
Wednesday, November 18, 2015, 4:00pm – 4:30pm
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Michelle Pearse, Senior Research Librarian
Often find yourself looking for data but don’t know where to start? Join us for a review of strategies and some of the best free and Harvard-licensed sources to get you started.
Register now

International Human Rights Research
Thursday, November 19, 2015, 12:00pm – 12:45pm
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Aslihan Bulut, Librarian For International, Foreign And Comparative Law
Starting your research on international human rights? Come and learn about the top resources to help you get started.
Register now

California Legal Research
Thursday, November 19, 2015, 4:00pm – 4:45pm
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Jennifer Allison, Librarian For International, Foreign And Comparative Law
Headed west this summer or after graduation? Learn about California-specific legal research resources in Westlaw, Lexis, and beyond.
Register now

Faculty Book Talk: Dean Martha Minow and Alex Whiting: The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints, Wed., Nov. 4 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Dean Martha Minow and Professor Alex Whiting’s new book, with co-editor C. Cora True-Frost, The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints (University of Michigan Press).

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC Milstein East B/C (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

final poster minow whiting sm for blog

Martha Minow, the Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, has taught at Harvard Law School since 1981, where her courses include civil procedure, constitutional law, family law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence, law and education, nonprofit organizations, and the public law workshop. An expert in human rights and advocacy for members of racial and religious minorities and for women, children, and persons with disabilities, she also writes and teaches about privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict.

Professor True-Frost is Assistant Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law. She joins SUCOL from Harvard Law School, where she was a Climenko Fellow. Her scholarship draws from the areas of international relations theory, administrative law, and public international law. She teaches classes in international and domestic criminal law, international human rights law, and regulatory law and policy.

Professor True-Frost earned an LL.M. from Harvard Law School and a J.D./M.P.A. magna cum laude as one of two Law Fellows at SUCOL and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. She has worked in East Timor and Sierra Leone and led the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security at UN headquarters. She was also a litigation associate at Cravath, Swaine and Moore LLP. Prior to law school, she taught middle school in Baltimore and Harlem with the Teach for America program.

Alex Whiting is a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School where he teaches, writes and consults on domestic and international criminal prosecution issues. From 2010 until 2013, he was in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague where he served first as the Investigations Coordinator, overseeing all of the investigations in the office, and then as Prosecutions Coordinator, overseeing all of the office’s ongoing prosecutions. Before going to the ICC, Whiting taught for more than three years as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, again with a focus on prosecution subjects. From 2002-2007, he was a Trial Attorney and then a Senior Trial Attorney with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague. He was lead prosecution counsel in Prosecutor v. Fatmir Limaj, Isak Musliu, and Haradin Bala; Prosecutor v. Milan Martic; and Prosecutor v. Dragomir Miloševic. Before going to the ICTY, he was a U.S. federal prosecutor for ten years, first with the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division in Washington, D.C., and then with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Boston where he focused on organized crime and corruption cases. Whiting attended Yale College and Yale Law School, and clerked for Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of the Eastern District of New York. His publications include Dynamic Investigative Practice at the International Criminal Court, 76 Law and Contemporary Problems 163 (2014), International Criminal Law: Cases and Commentary (2011), co-authored with Antonio Cassese and two other authors, and In International Criminal Prosecutions, Justice Delayed Can Be Justice Delivered, 50 Harv. Int’l L. J. 323 (2009). ”

About The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints

“The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) gave rise to the first permanent Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), with independent powers of investigation and prosecution. Elected in 2003 for a nine-year term as the ICC’s first Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo established policies and practices for when and how to investigate, when to pursue prosecution, and how to obtain the cooperation of sovereign nations. He laid a foundation for the OTP’s involvement with the United Nations Security Council, state parties, nongovernmental organizations, victims, the accused, witnesses, and the media.

This volume of essays presents the first sustained examination of this unique office and offers a rare look into international justice. The contributors, ranging from legal scholars to practitioners of international law, explore the spectrum of options available to the OTP, the particular choices Moreno Ocampo made, and issues ripe for consideration as his successor, Fatou B. Bensouda, assumes her duties. The beginning of Bensouda’s term thus offers the perfect opportunity to examine the first Prosecutor’s singular efforts to strengthen international justice, in all its facets.” — University of Michigan Press

Recent Reviews:

“This book . . . offers a unique perspective on one of the most innovative international endeavors to end impunity for and prevent massive atrocities.”
—  Luis Moreno Ocampo (from the Prologue)

“The First Global Prosecutor admirably and distinctively fills a gap in the existing literature on the International Criminal Court. In bringing together essays by both leading scholars and prominent jurists in the field, Minow delivers a volume that is compendious in scope, rich with insight, and judicious in its conclusions. At once timely and important, The First Global Prosecutor offers a vital contribution to ongoing debates about the structure, function and practice of the world’s first truly global prosecutor.”
—  Lawrence Douglas, Amherst College

“There are only few works that deal in-depth with the legacy of the first years of the ICC. This volume combines ‘insider’ and ‘external’ perspectives on the first years of the Office of the Prosecutor. It captures major themes that have become relevant during Moreno Ocampo’s tenure and helps us understand the ‘light’ and ‘shadow’ of international criminal justice in situations of conflict.”
—  Carsten Stahn, Leiden University

852 RARE: MASS(achusetts) Incarceration During the Nineteenth Century

Recently, an intriguing folder containing six broadsides came to light in Historical & Special Collections. These are very different from our largest collection of broadsides, which are English trial and execution broadsides (sometimes referred to as “dying speeches”) printed for popular consumption.

1827 & 1828

These are single sheet Annual report[s] of the convicts in the Massachusetts State Prison their employment, &c., with a correct view of the expenses and income of the Institution … for the years 1823-1828 and it turns out they’re very rare. According to WorldCat only the American Antiquarian Society and the Massachusetts Historical Society have some of the issues. For those whose libraries subscribe to Readex’s “America’s Historical Imprints”, five of the reports are available digitally as part of “American Broadsides and Ephemera, Series 1”.

The state prison, located in the Charlestown section of Boston was built in 1805. With the completion of the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Concord, in 1878, the prison population of the Charlestown prison declined. Among its later and better known inmates were Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, executed there in August 1927.

1825 close up

Detail of the 1825 report

The reports, signed by wardens Gamaliel Bradford (1823) and Thomas Harris (1824-1828), are statistical in nature and models of succinctness. While at first glance they may seem a bit dry, one can glean a great deal of information from them, including all of the prison’s expenses and income; the crimes for which inmates were imprisoned, ages, and lengths of sentences; and their prison employment. During this many period prisoners were engaged in cutting and transporting stone, working in the prison hospital, and picking oakum. Others were let out to contractors as cabinet and brush makers, as well as other skilled labor. The north wing built in 1828, was probably the “new prison” referred to in the reports starting in 1826 when 26 of the 313 current prisoners were working on its construction.

1827 close up

Detail of the 1827 report

Penciled notes on the Library’s copies of these broadsides provide some evidence of their provenance, and the piecemeal fashion in which they were acquired. The 1823 issue was a gift to the Harvard College Library from “Arthur G. Sedgwick of Cambridge” in November 1875–most likely the lawyer and writer who graduated Harvard College in 1864 and earned his LL.B. at the Law School in 1866. Sedgwick moved to New York City in 1875 to continue practicing law after several years in Boston. Perhaps his donation to the College was the result of office-cleaning in preparation for his move?

The back of the 1824 issue bears the signature of “Hon. Levi Thaxter.”

This may be lawyer Levi Lincoln Thaxter (Harvard College 1843, Harvard Law School 1845) who was married to poet and writer Celia Thaxter. “Gratis” is penciled on the front, so it was evidently a gift, but it is unclear from whom.

52256954 Sanborn

Harvard University – Harvard University Archives / Class Album. Class of 1855. HUD 255.704.1, Harvard University Archives

The 1825 and 1826 annual reports were also gifts, in 1865, of Frank B. Sanborn, Harvard College 1855. Here he is pictured in his Class album (HOLLIS 7505074).

The source of the 1827 and 1828 issues remains a mystery. A penciled note reads simply “no date of reception.” All six were transferred from the College Library to the Law School Library in June 1924, possibly in a batch described in the Law Library’s accession book as merely “Miscellaneous material”. These broadsides and their miscellaneous collection of facts and figures offer an intriguing glimpse into the state of Massachusetts prisons in the early nineteenth century. We are thankful to the Harvard College alumni who thought to give these interesting documents to their alma mater and to the library professionals who over the years have sought to preserve them. And given recent interest and concern about prisons and mass incarceration, both nationally and locally, these nearly 200 year old reports are an especially timely find.

Faculty Book Talk: I. Glenn Cohen and Holly Fernandez Lynch: FDA in the 21st Century: The Challenges of Regulating Drugs and New Technologies, Wednesday, October 28 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor I. Glenn Cohen and Holly Fernandez Lynch’s recently published book, FDA in the 21st Century: The Challenges of Regulating Drugs and New Technologies (Columbia University Press).

Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East C (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

FDA in the 21st Century

 

Ameet Sarpatwari

The talk will be moderated by Ameet Sarpatwari, Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Associate Epidemiologist, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

 

Book talk panelists include:

Aaron Seth Kesselheim

Aaron Seth Kesselheim, Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School, and Director of the Program On Regulation Therapeutic And the Law (PORTAL), Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

 

Daniel Carpenter

Daniel Carpenter, Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University, and Director of the Social Sciences program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

 

I. Glenn Cohen is Professor of Law and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology & Bioethics. He is one of the world’s leading experts on the intersection of bioethics (sometimes also called “medical ethics”) and the law, as well as health law. He also teaches civil procedure. Prof. Cohen’s current projects relate to health information technologies, mobile health, reproduction/reproductive technology, research ethics, rationing in law and medicine, health policy, FDA law and to medical tourism – the travel of patients who are residents of one country, the “home country,” to another country, the “destination country,” for medical treatment. His past work has included projects on end of life decision-making, FDA regulation and commodification.

He is the author of more than 70 articles and chapters and his award-winning work has appeared in leading legal (including the Stanford, Cornell, and Southern California Law Reviews), medical (including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA), bioethics (including the American Journal of Bioethics, the Hastings Center Report) and public health (the American Journal of Public Health) journals, as well as Op-Eds in the New York Times and Washington Post. Cohen is the editor of The Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Issues (Oxford University Press, 2013), the co-editor of Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future (MIT Press, 2014, co-edited with Holly Lynch, introduction available here), and the author of Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Cohen was selected as a Radcliffe Institute Fellow for the 2012-2013 year and by the Greenwall Foundation to receive a Faculty Scholar Award in Bioethics. He is currently one of the key co-investigators on a multi-million Football Players Health Study at Harvard which is committed to improving the health of NFL players. He leads the Ethics and Law initiative as part of the multi-million dollar NIH funded Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center program. He is also one of three editors-in-chief of the Journal of Law and the Biosciences, a peer-reviewed journal published by Oxford University Press.

Holly Fernandez Lynch is Executive Director of the Petrie-Flom Center. As Executive Director, Holly is responsible for oversight of the Center’s sponsored research portfolio, event programming, fellowships, student engagement, and a range of other projects and collaborations. She is Co-Lead of the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University, as well as Co-Lead of the Center’s Involvement with the Regulatory Foundations, Ethics, and Law Program of Harvard Catalyst, Harvard’s Clinical and Translational Science Center. In addition, she is Co-Editor of the Center’s collaborative health policy blog, Bill of Health.

Holly’s scholarship focuses on law, bioethics, and health policy, in particular the regulation and ethical conduct of research with human subjects domestically and internationally, pharmaceutical development and regulatory policy, conflicts of conscience in health care, medical professionalism, conflicts of interest, and religion in health care. She published Conflicts of Conscience in Health Care: An Institutional Compromise in 2008 (MIT Press), and released a co-edited volume from MIT Press in 2014 called Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future. She has served as Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, teaching a course on “Bioethics in the Courts,” as well as lecturer for Harvard Catalyst courses on “Introduction to Translational Medicine” and “Fundamentals of Clinical and Translational Research.” In 2014, Holly was appointed as a member of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 


 

“In its decades-long effort to assure the safety, efficacy, and security of medicines and other products, the Food and Drug Administration has struggled with issues of funding, proper associations with industry, and the balance between consumer choice and consumer protection. Today, these challenges are compounded by the pressures of globalization, the introduction of novel technologies, and fast-evolving threats to public health. With essays by leading scholars and government and private industry experts, FDA in the Twenty-First Century addresses perennial and new problems and the improvements the agency can make to better serve the public good.

The collection features essays on effective regulation in an era of globalization, consumer empowerment, and comparative effectiveness, as well as questions of data transparency, conflicts of interest, industry responsibility, and innovation policy, all with an emphasis on pharmaceuticals. The book also intervenes in the debate over off-label drug marketing and the proper role of the FDA before and after a drug goes on the market. Dealing honestly and thoroughly with the FDA’s successes and failures, contributors rethink the structure, function, and future of the agency and the effect policy innovations may have on regulatory institutions in other countries.” — Columbia University Press

Recent Reviews:

“The book contains a concise historical account of FDA regulation and insightful analyses of the major challenges the FDA will face over the next quarter century. The contributors, drawn from a variety of fields, are all authorities on the issues at hand. Although they certainly do not share the same opinions, their disagreements make the book remarkably balanced. Essential reading.” — Anup Malani, University of Chicago

“A truly magisterial collection, FDA in the 21st Century is a must-read for academics, practitioners, and social scientists interested in the future of drug and device regulation. The contributors offer thoughtful and well-researched policy approaches on conundrums facing the FDA itself, and similar agencies around the world. Bravo!” — Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland, Carey School of Law

“This insightful and informative book draws on a variety of perspectives to chart a course for FDA — and society — as we confront the challenges of medical product regulation in the 21st Century. It should be read by regulators and the regulated alike, as well as by patients, policymakers, payers, physicians, pharmacists — indeed, by anyone interested in human health.” — Daniel Troy, General Counsel, GlaxoSmithKline PLC; Chief Counsel, FDA, 2001-2004

“FDA in the 21st Century lives up to its title. Drawing on the historical evolution of the FDA, this book lays out, in a clear and thoughtful manner, the key questions for the future. At a time when scientific opportunities are presenting at lightning speed, and the expectations of the public for transparency, personalized medicine, and safety have never been greater, this is an important book.” — Amy Rick, Food & Drug Law Institute

New e-resources

The Harvard Library has an astounding number of resources, with new titles coming in every day! For help efficiently navigating it all, make an appointment to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

Among our newest e-resources:

Note: “about” descriptions are taken from the resources themselves.

ACADIA (Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture)

Publications from The Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, an international network of digital design researchers and professionals that facilitates critical investigations into the role of computation in architecture, planning, and building science, encouraging innovation in design creativity, sustainability, and education.    

Apabi Chinese Art Museum Picture Database

Chinese E-book Treasure House is a professional Chinese E-content integrated service platform launched by Beijing Founder Apabi Technology Limited. With a formidable collection of E-content, ranging from the majority of books published since the founding of the People’s Republic of China, various newspapers of all levels in China, yearbooks, reference books, pictures and other characteristic resource products, made available to readers, Chinese E-book Treasure House is dedicated to provide prime online reading, full article search, offline borrowing, mobile reading, download, printing and other convenient e-services to an array of clients like libraries, enterprises, governments, common readers, etc.

Atlanta Constitution 1946-1984

Archives from Atlanta’s metropolitan daily newspaper.

BrowZine

View top journals from your field in the BrowZine Scholarly Journal Room. BrowZine is a browsable newsstand of the library’s top journals. Easily discover, read, and monitor the key journals in your field.

Chinese Genealogy Zhongguo pu die ku 中国谱牒库

Chinese Philosophy & Religion Classics Zhongguo jing dian ku  中国经典库

CNKI. China Monographic Series Full-text Database 中国学术辑刊

Monographic Series is a complete set of proceedings published irregularly by academic institutions. CCJD is the sole academic monographic series full-text database in China. It has collected 588 titles and189011 full-text articles by now. Most of the publishers of the journals included in CCJD are higher education colleges, universities and academic institutions, which have high academic qualities and publish excellent papers, with strong expert knowledge and academic leading characters in each area.

CNKI. China Yearbooks Full-text Database 中国年鉴全文数据库

CYFD is the largest and continuously updated yearbooks full-text database in China. It covers various fields, including basic national conditions, geography, history, politics, military, diplomacy, law, economy, science technology, education, culture, sports, medical health, social life, figures, statistical material, documentary standard and regulations, etc. It has collected 2,828 titles and 22,756 volumes of yearbooks by now.

CuminCAD (Cumulative Index of Computer Aided Architectural Design) 

CumInCAD is a cumulative index of publications about computer aided architectural design. It includes bibliographic information about over 12,300 records from journals and conferences such as ACADIA, ASCAAD, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SiGraDi, CAAD futures, DDSS and others. All papers include full abstracts. Full texts, in PDF, of some 9,600 papers are also available.

Doing Bayesian Data Analysis, Second Edition: A Tutorial with R, JAGS, and Stan

There is an explosion of interest in Bayesian statistics, primarily because recently created computational methods have finally made Bayesian analysis obtainable to a wide audience. Doing Bayesian Data Analysis: A Tutorial with R, JAGS, and Stan provides an accessible approach to Bayesian data analysis, as material is explained clearly with concrete examples. The book begins with the basics, including essential concepts of probability and random sampling, and gradually progresses to advanced hierarchical modeling methods for realistic data. Included are step-by-step instructions on how to conduct Bayesian data analyses in the popular and free software R and WinBugs. This book is intended for first-year graduate students or advanced undergraduates. It provides a bridge between undergraduate training and modern Bayesian methods for data analysis, which is becoming the accepted research standard. Knowledge of algebra and basic calculus is a prerequisite.

International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition)

Latin America in Video

Latin America in Video offers quality original language documentaries from some of the most important producers and independent filmmakers in Latin America. The films were produced in Latin America, by Latin Americans, about Latin American issues, such as cultural identity, political history, human rights, popular culture, agribusiness, education, religion, and much more. It brings a comprehensive, exclusive and unique perspective on the region to any library.

Newsday 1940-1986 

This historical newspaper provides genealogists, researchers and scholars with online, easily-searchable first-hand accounts and unparalleled coverage of the politics, society and events of the time.

Online Music Anthology

A-R Editions’ Online Music Anthology is an extensive collection of examples designed expressly for music history courses. A-R’s Online Music Anthology contains many more pieces than print anthologies, all newly engraved and available online by subscription. (A-R offers complimentary access to instructors, pending approval of their requests.) Instructors can adapt the contents of the Online Music Anthology for use in a variety of courses, like any print anthology, but as an online resource, it is more powerful.

Révolution et l’Empire = Revolution and the Empire

This collection contains the complete works of the greatest historians of the nineteenth century, or 155 works, 1789-1815. Among the authors in this collection include: Aulard, Barante, Louis Blanc, Buchez, Jaures, Lamartine, Michelet, Quinet, Thiers or Tocqueville.

Scotsman 1817-1950

This historical newspaper provides genealogists, researchers and scholars with online, easily-searchable first-hand accounts and unparalleled coverage of the politics, society and events of the time.

SBRnet: Sports Business Research Network

SBRnet’s unique approach to research allows its users to focus on any one aspect of the market or on all segments, depending on a specific assignment or project. These aspects include but aren’t limited to current and historic TV viewership; social media usage; mobile device viewership; sport participation trends; apparel, footwear and equipment purchasing, gender issues in sport, financial trends, and youth sports, to name the most frequently used portions of SBRnet’s database. The more a sport business solution is based on current market data, the more likely it is to succeed.

tralac Trade Law Centre 

tralac engages in applied trade law and policy analysis, with the aim of addressing the most pressing trade matters for countries in the region. Our research is presented in different formats: news articles, electronic newsletters, trade briefs, working papers, and monographs.

You can also view our list of recently activated e-journals