Faculty Channel • Et. Seq: The Harvard Law School Library Blog

New platform for movies: Film Platform

Film Platform LogoWe’re happy to share the news that Harvard has access to an additional streaming platform for films, the aptly named Film Platform. Film Platform joins our existing film options which include our DVD collection, KanopyMet Opera on Demand, and other streaming services.

Film Platform contains a curated collection of educational films covering a variety of topics likely to be of interest to the HLS community: from legal studies generally to human rights, environmental studies, politics, and technology, among others.

What can you do with Film Platform?

  • View films on your own
  • Show them to a class
  • Screen them for student organization events (these must be free of charge)

Film Platform also offers an option to host Skype Q+A sessions with film makers. This requires an additional fee, which varies, but we’d be happy to explore the option with you.

If you have questions about Film Platform or films available at the library generally, ask a librarian and we’ll be happy to help.

Here are some examples of titles on Film Platform that may be of interest:

Chasing Ice
In the spring of 2005, acclaimed environmental photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment for National Geographic: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earth’s changing climate. Even with a scientific upbringing, Balog had been a skeptic about climate change. But that first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk. Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet.

3 1/2 Minutes, Ten Bullets
On Black Friday 2012, four African-American teenagers stopped at a gas station to buy gum and cigarettes. One of them, Jordan Davis, argued with Michael Dunn, a white man parked beside them, over the volume of music playing in their car. The altercation turned to tragedy when Dunn fired 10 bullets at the unarmed boys, killing Davis almost instantly. The seamlessly constructed, riveting documentary film 3 1⁄2 Minutes, Ten Bullets explores the danger and subjectivity of Florida’s Stand Your Ground self-defense laws by weaving Dunn’s trial with a chorus of citizen and pundit opinions, alongside the wrenching experiences of Jordan Davis’ parents.

Newtown
Filmed over the course of nearly three years, the filmmakers use unique access and never before heard testimonies to tell a story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history. Newtown documents a traumatized community fractured by grief and driven toward a sense of purpose. Joining the ranks of a growing club to which no one wants to belong, a cast of characters interconnect to weave an intimate story of community resilience.

E-TEAM
Anna, Ole, Fred and Peter are four members of the Emergencies Team — or E-Team — the most intrepid division of a respected, international human rights group. Trained to deal with unfolding crises, the E-Team flies to hotspots all over the world as soon as allegations of human rights abuse surface.

Virunga
In the forested depths of eastern Congo lies Virunga National Park, one of the most biodiverse places on earth and home to the planet’s last remaining mountain gorillas. In this wild but enchanted environment, a small and embattled team of park rangers – including an ex-child soldier turned ranger, a caretaker of orphan gorillas and a dedicated conservationist – protect this UNESCO World Heritage site from armed militia, poachers and the dark forces struggling to control Congo’s rich natural resources.

Fukushima – A Nuclear Story
What was it that saved Tokyo from a nuclear disaster? Narrated by Willem Dafoe, this is the story of the foreign journalists who were are allowed to enter the Fukushima-Daiichi power plant after waiting two years to uncover the truth about the 2011 accident hidden behind those walls. The ex-premier Naoto Kan reveals the events as they really happened. Using digital reconstruction to elucidate the scientific complexities of the accident, the film uncovers the layers of accountability at play.

The C Word
With a dose of good humor, heart, and a touch of rock—n—roll beat, THE C WORD reveals the forces at play keeping us sick and dares to ask: if up to 70% of cancer deaths are preventable…what are we waiting for? At the heart of The C Word are powerful, twin narratives: one from celebrated French neuroscientist and cancer revolutionary Dr. David Servan-Schreiber, the other fromThe C Word‘s own director, Meghan L. O’Hara. After braving the journey from diagnosis to wellness, Meghan and David join forces on a wild ride of discovery; including hidden science, the absurdity of the status quo, and a vibrant cast of characters changing the game.

A Brave Heart
From the producers of the most viewed TEDWomen event of 2013 comes “A Brave Heart: The Lizzie Velasquez Story,” a documentary following the inspiring journey of 26 year old, 58 pound Lizzie from cyber-bullying victim to anti-bullying activist. The film chronicles unheard stories and details of Lizzie’s physical and emotional journey up to her multi-million viewed TEDx talk, and follows her pursuit from a motivational speaker to Capitol Hill as she lobbies for the first federal anti-bullying bill.

852 RARE: New Exhibit — Kids in the Collection: Prison, Work, and Play

Most of the material in Historical & Special Collections is rooted in the world of adults, but children do make appearances, sometimes in unexpected ways. There are traces of the childhood experiences in HLS faculty papers, school report cards, and letters sent home from camp.

A young Paul Freund wearing a baker’s costume, 1911
Photograph postcard, 13.7 x 8.7 cm
Paul Freund Visual Materials, ca. 1911-1988
Record ID: olvwork368707

Not all is light-hearted, however, as seen in grim broadsides detailing violent crimes where children were the victims; sobering reports of the inner workings of a Massachusetts reform school; and images of toddlers raised in prison by their incarcerated mothers in nineteenth century England. Also showcased is some of the work undertaken by HLS students and faculty on behalf of children and families in Massachusetts and across the United States. The exhibit draws on a variety of media: manuscript collections, printed works, photographs, and children’s art work, dating from the late-eighteenth century through the twentieth century.

Image from The criminal prisons of London and scenes of prison life, by Henry Mayhew and John Binny (London, 1862)

This exhibit was curated by Jane Kelly and Mary Person of Historical & Special Collections. It will be on view in the Caspersen Room from April through July 2017 with online addenda at bit.ly/HSCexhibit.

New E-resources

The Harvard Library has an astounding number of resources, and we get more all the time! For help efficiently navigating it all, make an appointment to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

You can also view our list of recently activated e-journals.

Among our newest e-resources are:

Note: “about” descriptions are taken from the resources themselves.

Anthropological Fieldwork Online
Anthropological Fieldwork Online brings the fieldwork underpinning the great ethnographies of the early 20th century into the digital world. This fully indexed, primary source database unfolds the historical development of anthropology from a global perspective, bringing together the work of early scholars who shaped the theories and methods students learn about, critique and re-shape today.

Arbitration Law
JURIS’ ArbitrationLaw.com provides immediate database access to more than 160 proprietary Treatises, Practice Manuals, and Monographs that cannot be found on Kluwer Arbitration, LexisNexis, Westlaw, or any other platform. With both proprietary and public domain, ArbitrationLaw is a comprehensive, indispensable research tool. A powerful search engine enables you to search inside thousands of PDF documents. An account allows you to save your search history as well as your download history. Your research is incomplete without JURIS’ ArbitrationLaw.

 The Archives of Cuba | Los archivos de Cuba
This is an invaluable comprehensive guide to the archival holdings and manuscript collections located in depositories throughout Cuba.

Australian law dictionary
This dictionary is a key reference for those who need familiarity with—and knowledge of—Australian legal terms. Designed for students in response to research, it is structured to ensure comprehensive coverage of core legal content. Clear, relevant, and well-pitched definitions explain the meaning of Australian legal terms and detailed cross referencing is provided; readers are encouraged to learn the meaning of a particular term, link it with related concepts, and locate it within the larger body of law. This second edition has been fully updated, with each entry including up-to-date examples of cases and legislation, as well as revised appendices, and more than 300 new terms in total.         

Biblioteca Virtual de la Filologia Espanola
Directorio bibliográfico de diccionarios, gramáticas, libros de historia de la lengua, de ortografía, ortología, prosodia, métrica, diálogos.          

Biodiversity of the Hengduan Mountains and Adjacent Areas of South-Central China
The mountains of south-central China are widely regarded as a global biodiversity hotspot. This site documents primary data about plants and fungi from the Hengduan Mountains and adjacent areas of south-central China, including the Gaoligong Mountains and Tibetan Himalaya. Our database emphasizes specimens and place names.

The Biota of North America Program    

Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century
The focus of the Federal Government Records module is on the political side of the freedom movement, the role of civil rights organizations in pushing for civil rights legislation, and the interaction between African Americans and the federal government in the 20th century.  Major collections in this module include the FBI Files on Martin Luther King Jr.; Centers of the Southern Struggle, an exceptional collection of FBI Files covering five of the most pivotal arenas of the civil rights struggle of the 1960s: Montgomery, Albany, St. Augustine, Selma, and Memphis; and records from the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations, detailing the interaction between civil rights leaders and organizations and the highest levels of the federal government.   

Chinese Historical Local Archives Database 中国地方历史文献数据库              

Dave Leip’s atlas of the U.S. presidential elections, 1948-2016
U.S. Presidential county-level election results for presidential election years 1948, 1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2005, 2008, 2012, 2016.

Deutsche Geschichte im 20. Jh.: Nationalsozialismus, Holocaust, Widerstand und Exil 1933-1945 Online

Franz Boas Papers, 1862-1942
During the half century leading up to the Second World War, Franz Boas helped to define academic anthropology in the United States. Trained as a geographer at the University of Heidelberg, Boas worked initially on the Inuit of Baffin Island and subsequently on the cultures of the Indians of the Northwest Pacific Coast, becoming a leading figure in American anthropology by the first decade of the twentieth century. As Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, Boas made significant theoretical contributions to ethnology, linguistics, and physical anthropology, helping to ingrain the four fields approach in his discipline and introducing the concept of cultural relativism into wide currency. He was, as well, a committed Socialist and an ardent opponent of both racism and fascism.

This collection includes correspondence that Boas carried on with his colleagues in anthropology, as well as with those in the other social sciences and sciences. This correspondence is rich as a source for twentieth-century historians interested in “radical” social causes, since Boas was a socialist and an outspoken voice for progressive social causes.

HeinOnline Religion and the Law
Contains hundreds of unique titles and nearly one million pages, including books, periodicals, and bibliographies. This collection provides a research platform for the development, history, organization, and fundamental principles of various world religions. The collection also includes the Christian Legal Society publications, an assortment of Canon Law, and rare historical bibles.           

HeinOnline Tax Foundation Archive Publications
This collection provides convenient access to the complete archive of the Tax Foundation’s publications, which contain information on taxation, fiscal policy, finance and more. No other fiscal organization in the country enjoys the respect and reputation for objectivity earned by the Tax Foundation. Browse by publication title or subject, or use HeinOnline’s powerful search capabilities to search for specific topics.

HeinOnline World Treaties Library
This monumental collection brings together Rohn, Dumont, Bevans, Martens, League of Nations, United States, and United Nations treaties into one easy-to-use and fully searchable database. Search a comprehensive treaty index by keywords, title, parties, sign date or citation. Also included are hundreds of related treaty publications, scholarly articles chosen by our editors, and a bibliography of related publications.     

Keeping our Traditions Alive
Compendium of best practices in promoting the traditional ways of life of Arctic indigenous people.

Law & Society since the Civil War
This module consists of 11 collections from the Harvard Law School Library, highlighting three Supreme Court Justices, the first Black federal judge, high-profile cases, and insights into developing ideologies and laws, as far back as 1861 with the Papers of Oliver Wendell Holmes, which span from the Civil War to the Great Depression. The Papers of Louis D. Brandeis and Felix Frankfurter provide a behind-the-scenes view of the Supreme Court between 1919 and 1961. The Frankfurter Papers are of special note because they reveal how the Supreme Court approached the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the landmark school desegregation case that is well documented in other History Vault modules.

Malpighiaceae  

Musical Theater Songs
MusicalTheaterSongs.com’s easy-to-use interface lets you enter up to 20-plus parameters (voice type, character age, range, ease for accompanist, descriptive characteristics, etc.) to generate a list of songs tailored to your needs from an ever-growing database (thousands of titles already!).

MusicalTheaterSongs.com draws from 150 years of musical theater repertoire, ranging from well-known standards to rare finds to help you find the right songs quickly and easily. As an added feature, once you get your list of titles, we link you to various sites to make it simple to buy, rent, trade or download the sheet music and recordings. (Subject to availability)  Everything you need to find the right song, right now is in one place.

National Population Census of China (NPCC) database

Oxford Bibliographies. Education
Oxford Bibliographies. Psychology
Oxford Bibliographies provides faculty and students alike with a seamless pathway to the most accurate and reliable resources for a variety of academic topics. Every article in our database is an authoritative guide to the current scholarship, written and reviewed by academic experts, with original commentary and annotations.  

Oxford encyclopedia of the bible and law
The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Law (OEBL) provides the most up-to-date and extensive treatment of the Bible and law yet attempted, both updating and expanding the scope of previous scholarship in the field. In comprehensive overviews, scholars at the forefront of biblical studies and law address three foci: (1) biblical law itself—its nature, collections, and genres; (2) the ancient contexts of biblical law, throughout the ancient Mediterranean (ancient Near Eastern, Greco-Roman, and Early Jewish); and (3) the afterlife and influence of biblical law in antiquity and in modern jurisprudence around the world. Essays include treatments of the Book of the Covenant, the Ten Commandments, the Sermon on the Mount, Greek Law, and the Laws of Hammurapi, but also testimony and witness, property, ritual, rhetoric, gender, and sexual legislation.

The Encyclopedia contains 130 entries ranging in length from 3,000 to 7,000 words. With bibliographic references and suggestions for further reading, each entry provides a thorough overview of the topic and serves as an entrance point to further original research for both seasoned scholars and beginning students. Given its full-orbed exploration of biblical law and its detailed summary of current scholarship, OEBL is guaranteed to secure a privileged place in the history of biblical and legal scholarship.   

Quaderni Mediterranea:  ricerche storiche         

Rock’s Backpages
The online library of pop music journalism: over 33,000 classic articles on artists from Aaliyah to ZZ Top, on all genres from rockabilly to hip hop, by the finest music writers of the last 50 years.

SEApapers
Subscribing to, receiving, accessing and preserving newspapers and other serials from Southeast Asia has always been a difficult and expensive process.  Even the most comprehensive library collections can at best only provide very incomplete coverage of the region’s serials.  The goal of the SEApapers Archive is to overcome many of these issues for the various library collections around the country that are interested in long-term digital access to newspapers, journals and other serials from Southeast Asia.

SwissLex
Swisslex banque de données juridiques suisse SA est le fournisseur d’informations juridiques leader sur le marché suisse. Notre service garantit que vous puissiez trouver, utiliser et mettre en lien les informations juridiques souhaitées de manière simple et sûre. Notre offre complète contient les collections d’arrêts des tribunaux fédéraux et de la plupart des tribunaux cantonaux de dernière instance depuis les années 1970, et même depuis 1954 s’agissant du Tribunal fédéral. Les archives Swisslex comprennent les données d’environ 73 revues spécialisées (y.c. leurs archives), un grand nombre de commentaires de lois et plus de 2’650 œuvres de la littérature spécialisée à ce jour. Dans une collection séparée, Swisslex offre également un accès au droit communautaire de l’UE avec ses traités, règlements et directives, les décisions de la CJCE ainsi que le journal de la Commission.

En tout, environ 515’000 documents sont disponibles dans leur texte intégral. Environ 18‘000 utilisatrices et utilisateurs d’études d’avocats, d’autorités administratives et d’entreprises ainsi que 31’000 utilisateurs du domaine universitaire effectuent à peu près 180‘000 transactions de recherche par mois et consultent plus de 330’000 documents. Swisslex se profile donc comme leader sur le marché de l’information juridique en ligne. Un thesaurus en trois langues permet de tenir compte des particularités du paysage juridique multilingue suisse. Ainsi, une recherche dans une seule langue nationale suffit à trouver tous les documents dans leur langue d’origine. Diverses fonctions de recherche et des filtres de métadonnées améliorent encore la recherche, pour des résultats ciblés.

Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915 Plantation Records I
Southern Life and African American History, 1775-1915, Plantation Records Part II     
The Plantation Records in this module documents the far-reaching impact of plantations on both the American South and the nation. As business owners, the commodities produced by plantation owners—rice, cotton, sugar, tobacco, hemp, and others— accounted for more than half of the nation’s exports. The plantation, therefore, played a key role in the development of a nationwide market economy. Plantation records also document the personal lives of plantation owners and their families.

The records presented in this Part II come from the University of Virginia and Duke University. Major collections from the holdings of the University of Virginia include the Tayloe Family Papers, Ambler Family Papers, Cocke Family Papers, Gilliam Family Papers, Barbour Family Papers, and Randolph Family Papers. Major collections from the Duke University holdings document plantation life in the Alabama, as well as South Carolina, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland.

Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on almost 36,000 slaving voyages
that forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans for transport to the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. The actual number is estimated to have been as high as 12.5 million. The database and the separate estimates interface offer researchers, students and the general public a chance to rediscover the reality of one of the largest forced movements of peoples in world history.   

Women and Social Movements, Modern Empires Since 1840
Women and Social Movements in Modern Empires since 1820 explores prominent themes in world history since 1820: conquest, colonization, settlement, resistance, and post-coloniality, as told through women’s voices. With a clear focus on bringing the voices of the colonized to the forefront, this highly-curated archive and database includes documents related to the Habsburg Empire, the Ottoman Empire, the British, French, Italian, Dutch, Russian, Japanese, and United States Empires, and settler societies in the United States, New Zealand and Australia.

Zhonghua Ancient Books Database 华经典古籍库 

852 RARE: Learned Hand’s Tailor

Billings Learned Hand (1872-1961): Distinguished alumnus of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. Chief Judge on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. One of the twentieth century’s most noted jurists …

… and a secret fashionista.

The Harvard Law School Library’s Historical & Special Collections has the papers of Judge Hand. One of our most heavily used collections, it contains a trove of information about law, lawyers, and life in its hundreds of boxes encompassing some 120 feet of material. You might expect to encounter correspondence from famous lawyers, judges, and politicians; legal opinions; and records of Judge Hand’s professional and social activities: it’s all there. But tucked away in Box 57 are three folders of correspondence between him and the staff of Alfred Webb Miles, custom tailors doing business at 12 Brook Street near Savile Row and Hanover Square in the heart of London.

Alfred Webb Miles Trade Card

Alfred Webb Miles & Co. Trade and Measurements Card, Learned Hand Papers, HOLLIS 601605, Box 57, folder 39.

Folder 39 reveals an engaged correspondence from a man who took his tailoring seriously. In these days of fast fashion and online shopping delivered overnight, it’s instructive to learn how men of a particular professional and social class bought their clothes. In response to a 1934 request from Judge Hand, Alfred Webb Miles sent a booklet of styles and several fabric swatches suitable for “light summer woolen suits.”

AWM Fashion Book

Alfred Webb Miles Fashion Book (undated; ca. 1934)

Judge Hand circled model number 2, a straight, single-breasted style, and marked three swatches as his choices number 1, 2, and 3.

AWM Suit Selections

Alfred Webb Miles Suit Selections (ca. 1934)

His chosen fabric is a fine black and white weave with a dashing streak of electric blue running through it:

Fabric Swatch

Learned Hand’s number 1 fabric choice (ca. 1934)

When placing his order in a letter dated May 21, 1934, the 62-year-old judge had, shall we say, a few requests: “The trousers are to be made with cuffs, a straight back, two hip pockets and a small front pocket on the right side of the band; suspender buttons on the outside, but loops for a belt. In the jacket, a ticket pocket inside the right hand side pocket, and two inside breast pockets, as well as one outside.”

Initial Order

Learned Hand’s Initial Order to Alfred Webb Miles & Co., May 21, 1934

Invoice

Alfred Webb Miles Invoice to Learned Hand, June 15, 1934

Sadly, the relationship soured soon thereafter. Hand wrote in a letter dated 1935 (not shown) that a recent suit had arrived with the chest and armholes cut too tightly. He directed the tailors to take note of his measurements on file and cut the next suit jacket with more room.

It was not to be. In a letter dated June 1, 1936, Judge Hand ended his 25-year relationship with Alfred Webb Miles & Co.: “… I particularly asked you this time to give me more room under the arms and to make the coat larger around the chest. Your cutter has apparently paid no attention whatever to these instructions. … There is of course no inducement to have any more made if my orders cannot be better observed.”

Complaint Letter

Letter of complaint from Learned Hand to Alfred Webb Miles & Co., June 1, 1936

While the parties exchanged a couple more cordial letters, it appears that Judge Hand never bought another suit from Alfred Webb Miles & Co. Other folders in the collection show that he did business with London tailors Meyer & Mortimer from 1925-1938, and again from 1941-1951.

This is the fun of archival research: you never know what the next unexpected detour will be. We hope you visit Historical & Special Collections or another archive, and see what hidden treasures you discover!

Changes in Library Fines and Loan Rules Policies

We have some changes to report on library loan periods and fines at Harvard–and we think you’ll like them!

Changes that took effect April 1:

  • The loan period has been standardized so that all Harvard-ID-holding faculty, staff, and students will enjoy semester loans on regular loan items from Harvard’s libraries.
  • HL will no longer charge the $0.50 per day standard overdue fines for regular loan items. Fines for long-overdue/lost material and reserve/media/equipment items will remain the same.

Beginning on May 1, in order to further encourage the return of items that are in demand by other library users, Harvard Library is raising its fee for overdue recalled material from $2.00 to $3.00 per day.

For more detail and explanation, please visit the Harvard Library post Changes in Library Fines and Loan Rules Policies.

Justice Scalia’s papers donated to HLS Library–what’s next?

Blog post by Meg Kribble, Research Librarian & Outreach Coordinator; Ed Moloy, Curator of Modern Manuscripts and Archives; and Jessica Farrell, Curator of Digital Collections.

We are very excited about the news that the family of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (HLS, ’60) will donate his Papers to the HLS Library.

It’s an honor for any library to be selected to preserve and make accessible the papers of a Supreme Court Justice, and we are grateful to the Scalia family for selecting the HLS Library. We look forward to sharing periodic updates on our progress and to making the collection available over the years to come.

Portrait of Justice Antonin Scalia by Nelson Shanks

Because the Supreme Court does not display portraits of sitting justices, Justice Scalia’s official portrait by Nelson Shanks resided in our Reading Room from 2008 until his death, when it was returned to the Court.

What happens next?

Justice Scalia served on the Court for nearly three decades. Prior to that, he practiced law, taught at the University of Virginia and the University of Chicago, and served as a judge on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Throughout his career, he gave speeches, wrote articles, and received awards. Materials from all of these activities will likely be included in the collection.

Communication methods evolved over the course of the Justice’s career to include documents created on computers as well as traditional print materials. While his papers aren’t the first papers of a Supreme Court Justice to include electronic records, this will be the first time electronic records will be transferred from the Supreme Court to an archive. As you can see, Justice Scalia’s papers, like those of other Supreme Court Justices, are likely to be a large, complex collection that will take years to process.

Many papers of Supreme Court Justices come with restrictions on when they may be made accessible to researchers; Justice Scalia’s are no different. You can compare the restrictions on his papers (mentioned in the article link above) with the restrictions of some of his predecessors on the Court in Susan David deMaine and Benjamin J. Keele’s visual presentation, Access to Justice? A Study of Access Restrictions on the Papers of U.S. Supreme Court Justices.

What’s involved in processing a collection of this magnitude?

The first step is transferring the collection, both physically and electronically.

The method of physical transfer always depends on what’s in the collection–general movers and sometimes special art movers may be involved. Electronic material is either transferred over a secure connection using software that encrypts, virus checks, and establishes data integrity for the files; or it is sent physically in the form of a hard drive or whole device, such as a computer or tablet. This data is stored in a highly secure environment especially before a survey has been conducted to identify types and quantity of sensitive data that exist.

As for the processing itself, while some details are changing to adapt to the challenges of electronic files, the fundamental process remains unchanged:

  • First, a survey is done that provides an overview of a collection’s content. For electronic files, the survey is conducted using digital forensics techniques borrowed from the law enforcement community. Information about the files is extracted without altering the files in any way. If the content is on physical media, data is extracted using an arsenal of adapters and write-blockers.
  • In the next step, the survey information informs how a collection will be arranged, typically by broad record group (series) such as “correspondence” or “teaching material.” Digital forensics software helps identify topics across the electronic material without the need for opening individual files.
  • Arrangement of folders–electronic and physical–takes place guided by the established arrangement’s organizational structure.
  • During arrangement, some material is restricted or redacted based on the agreement with the donor, university records policies, and/or privacy concerns identified by the archivist. Again, for electronic material, software aids this process.
  • A finding aid is produced describing the scope and content of the collection, biographical information about the creator, information about each series, and an inventory typically broken down to the box and folder level. Researchers use finding aids to guide them to material relevant to their work.
  • A HOLLIS (Harvard Library catalog) record is created, which links to the finding aid. Digital content is deposited into Harvard’s Digital Repository Service (DRS) for long-term digital preservation and access. For files that can be released to the public, access links are included in the finding aid.

While you’re waiting for the year 2020, when Justice Scalia’s papers begin to become available, we encourage you to learn about the other collections of Supreme Court Justices that the HLS Library holds:

  • Louis D. Brandeis (HLS class of 1877), Papers, 1881-1966 Finding Aid
  • Opinions of Benjamin R. Curtis (HLS class of 1831), 1858-1860 HOLLIS (Contains opinions of Curtis on a variety of topics some of which were made outside of his position on the bench. Also contains some correspondence to him requesting his opinion on different issues.)
  • Felix Frankfurter (HLS class of 1906), Papers, 1900-1965 Finding Aid
  • The John G. Palfrey collection of Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Papers, 1715-1938 Finding Aid | Digital Suite
  • Joseph Story (HLS Dane Professor of Law, 1829-1845), Papers, 1796-1844 Finding Aid | Digital Suite

All about PLI PLUS: treatises, program transcripts, and more!

PLI PLUS logoHave you checked out PLI PLUS lately? If so, you may have noticed its clean and updated user interface. But it has great content too! We recently had a library update with our PLI rep, and I’m here to share my notes again. If you’re a student, faculty member, or practitioner, read on for some highlights to help you get (re-)acquainted.

If you haven’t used PLI PLUS before, here’s some quick background:

The PLI PLUS platform provides a comprehensive library of treatises, course handbooks, and answer books from the Practising Law Institute (PLI), a nonprofit organization known for its accredited continuing legal and professional education programs delivered by volunteer faculty including lawyers, judges, corporate counsel, regulators and other professionals. Transcripts of its webcast programs and seminars are also available on PLI PLUS.

PLI’s seminars are up-to-the minute current. For example, last month it offered two seminars on immigration, Challenging Immigration Detention with Habeas Petitions on February 2 and Immigration Executive Orders: What You and Your Clients Need to Know on February 15.

Major content in PLI PLUS:

  • Over 100 treatises
  • Answer Books: these are Q&A style, useful for students new on clinics, and they also include case studies
  • Course Handbooks: these are often available before program, and also includes case studies
  • Program Transcripts from their seminars and webcasts (available for all programs except those by government speakers)
  • Forms: search, download, and edit over 3000 forms from across the platform

Narrow your search results: there is a narrowing function to focus your search results within only the books you think might be most useful.

PDF format: All titles on the platform (with the exception of some archived program books) are available in PDF by chapter.

More about PLI PLUS forms:

  • Forms open in RTF
  • Forms include full agreements/contracts, and clauses
  • You can click through to the book that is source of a form
  • You can pull up a list of all forms contained in any chapter on the platform

General features

  • Search across platform, book, and individual chapters
  • Book overview contains update information (like e-pocket parts)
  • Permalinks to sections and content areas are available
  • Course Books: related contents lnk will give the history of a title with related transcripts and forms
  • Full archive of material to 2000, some content goes back to 1980 or its origination date
  • Practice areas on immigration and privacy & cybersecurity
  • Login accounts – doesn’t work for basic answers (requires proxy) but for remote access for facstaff this can be set up

Create your own login account within the HLS access to use additional features:

  • Ability to make notes and highlights in content (plus option to include these when sharing content via email)
  • Create your own My Bookshelf and subshelves that you can add chapters and titles to, plus share links to your shelves with others (this could be useful for faculty assigning content, students working together on projects in clinics and other settings)
  • View all your notes and marks on one page
  • Note that creating your own login doesn’t work for getting remote access to PLI PLUS–you’ll still need to authenticate with a Harvard proxy link (or remember that you can always get to it by searching for PLI PLUS in the HOLLIS catalog).

How Leadership Library can help you track people in government

Are you tracking the latest staffing changes in Congress and the White House? Following Senate confirmation hearings?

Last week, a couple of our staff tuned into a webinar by Leadership Directories to learn more about how LDI’s Leadership Library database can be used to keep up with the presidential staff, new members of Congress and their staff (including office locations and contact details!), and a number of other helpful features.

The webinar video is only 17 minutes and well worth the time to watch if you want some tips on following the changes in Washington. Below the video, I’m including some highlights from my own notes.

Notes:

  • Right now, Leadership Library’s front page defaults to its pre-built lists that relate to the outcome of the 2016 elections. New members of Congress, updated rosters of all members of Congress, new presidential staff and transition team members, and state legislators and executive staff. The list of all the new president’s staff contains about 1600 people.
  • The Election 2016 lists are great places to start and you can customize your views, selecting which columns to view and in what order they appear. The lists can be exported to Excel and CSV files and also have a variety of alert options–all changes, appointed, promoted, and departing staff.
  • Use the build a list option to create a list of presidential appointees requiring Senate confirmation: click Build a List>Job Function>expand the Appointed Official option and select Presidential Appointee Requiring Senate Confirmation. Again, you can use options to organize, export, and get alerts on your data.
  • Use the Explore Organizations link to look at federal org charts, including the Executive Office of the President and federal agencies.
  • Data in the Leadership Library is updated daily by a team of 40.
  • If you need help, live chat support and a contact form are available.

There’s a lot more that Leadership Library can help you with, including researching potential employers and getting very detailed info about Congressional offices for interviewing, or just to find the most relevant staff member to share a concern with. To learn more, check out my colleague AJ Blechner’s Guide to Employer Research and Guide to Congressional Information Searching or Ask a Librarian.

852 RARE: Guest Blog – Molding the Legal Mind: The Notebooks of Harvard Law Students

Many of us would shudder to imagine a researcher 100 years from now poring over our college lecture notes, scribbled in spiral-bound notebooks or, more likely, typed up in hundreds of sporadically organized .docx files. Historical & Special Collections at the Harvard Law School Library has been doing just that, cataloging a collection of over 250 students’ class notebooks amounting to hundreds of volumes. Dating from approximately 1860 to 1970, the collection represents an era that encompassed some of the most formative decades of the Law School’s curriculum and reputation. The Class Notes Collection, now fully cataloged for the first time, should be of great interest to anyone working on legal history, legal education, or the history of Harvard Law School itself.

View of spines of volumes of class notes.

Miscellaneous class notes volumes

Page of class notes in black and red ink taken during lectures on trusts

Page from the class notes of Eliot Harlow Robinson taken from lectures on trusts given at the Harvard Law School by James Barr Ames, 1907-1908
HOLLIS 14778115

The bulk of the collection takes the form of neatly homogeneous, crimson-leather-bound notebooks purchased from the Harvard Coop and inscribed on the inner cover with students’ names, local addresses, and desk numbers. “Louis L. Jaffe, 3 Perkins Hall,” one notebook reads. “3L, 1927-28. Property.” Many of the students’ names sound antiquated and (to this author’s ear) aristocratic; with a single exception, all are male. Case law is written on transparent onionskin sheets the size and shape of Post-Its and pasted in on top of lecture notes; red ink is typically used to underline and summarize key arguments in the margins. One gets the impression of a disciplined and uniform method of note-taking, taught from an early age, which gradually fell away after the Second World War and was abandoned as standard practice by the 1960s.

 

 

 

Detail of page of handwritten notes in blue and red ink. At the top of the page is written "Wolf vs the American Trust and Savings Bank

Detail of a page of class notes of Paul Cleveland
taken during the second year course “Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes” taught by Morton Campbell, 1931-1932
HOLLIS 14453392

While the notebooks have the outward appearance of uniformity, within, they attest to rich personal histories. Exam prompts, holiday cards, and even the occasional love letter are tucked between their pages. Current law students may find comfort in the near ubiquity of question marks and crossed-out phrases (as well as large splotches of ink). Some are covered in doodles, caricatures, and exhortations (“To hell with Beale!” writes Chauncey Craven Hackett (LL.B. 1906) in his 1905 notes on Equity, taught by Beale), while others suggest great discipline and organization, such as the tidy script and thorough indexing of future HLS professor Austin Wakeman Scott (1884-1981). Many of the notebooks were donated to the library by graduates’ children and grandchildren, and some have been carefully typed up and bound in display volumes. Notable legal minds represented in this collection include Zechariah Chafee (1885-1957), E. Merrick Dodd (1888-1951), Felix Frankfurter (1882-1965), Paul Freund (1908-1992), and David Charny (1955-2000). Their class notes provide valuable and perhaps otherwise inaccessible windows into their formative years as students and thinkers.

Open volume of handwritten notes in blue and black ink. On the right side is printed advertisement from Burke & Co. Tailors

Detail of a page of class notes of Manley Ottmer Hudson, 1907-1910
HOLLIS 2004707

The collection should also be very useful to the study of legal curriculum and its development across the twentieth century. While the 1L course load of Torts, Contracts, and Criminal Law has remained largely unchanged since the nineteenth century, a proliferation of electives can be observed beginning in the 1960s, yielding Soviet Law, Antitrust Law, Psychoanalytic Theory and Legal Assumptions, even a class taught by Henry Kissinger on National Security Policy in 1967. From this collection one can learn how Justice Stephen Breyer taught his class on Antitrust Law, or how Derek Bok taught Economic Regulation, through the eyes of their students. The pressures of US history are also apparent, from the cluster of deaths, withdrawals, and hastily rearranged course schedules during World War II, to notes on segregation, the KKK, and Communism in the 1940s and 1950s.

Detail of handwritten page of notes at top of page is written "Commentaries on the Laws of England Book 2nd"

Detail of a page of class notes of John Willard Bickford, 1864-1865
HOLLIS 2594561
Bickford was from Hillsborough, New Hampshire. He entered Harvard Law School in 1865 but his career was ended when he drowned in the Charles River on June 26, 1866.

It is the otherwise anonymous, little-heard voices of HLS students across the years that form the bulk of the collection—studying for their exams, trying to remember their locker codes, and forging the opinions that have shaped legal discourse across the last two centuries. We encourage students, faculty, and researchers to come see for themselves what has changed—and what has remained the same—about the studying and teaching of law at Harvard since the late nineteenth century.

Georgia Henley is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University, finishing a dissertation on the transmission of historical texts and manuscripts between England and Wales in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. She works part-time in Historical & Special Collections at the Harvard Law School Library.

Note: For now, the easiest way to see the entire collection is in HOLLIS Classic. Under search type select “Other call number” and search for “Class Notes Collection”.

Jonathan Zittrain statement for the record on access to legal information

Updated at 11:44am to include a PDF of the statement.

Today at 10am, a statement for the record from our faculty director and Vice Dean, Library And Information Resources, Jonathan Zittrain, will be part of House Judiciary Committee’s IP Subcommittee hearing on Judicial Transparency and Ethics. You can watch the hearing live at the link!

Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte and Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet Subcommittee Chairman Darrell Issa released the following joint statement prior to the hearing:

Tomorrow the IP Subcommittee will hold an important oversight hearing to examine the many issues facing our federal courts system. The oversight hearing will look at several transparency issues, including the effectiveness of the PACER service and use of audio and video recordings of courtroom procedures. Additionally, the hearing will examine internal judicial disciplinary rules and procedures.

Zittrain’s statement will discuss the importance of and need for public access to court decisions and related issues.

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