Faculty Book Talks •

Caselaw Access Project Scanning Now Complete

Post by Kim Dulin and Meg Kribble

We at the Harvard Law School Library are thrilled to report a major milestone achieved in our our Caselaw Access Project (CAP), which will make U.S. state and federal court decisions freely accessible online.

Last Friday at 3:29pm, we finished scanning the final volume of material. Since CAP launched in 2013, we have scanned 39,796 volumes and 38.6 million pages of material covering 334 years of American caselaw.

Many teams–totaling dozens of contributors from across the HLS Library and beyond–shaped the project plan and built the technical infrastructure to support the work that our project digitization team carried out. We are deeply grateful to all contributors to the project
from inception to date for their hard work and dedication.

Next steps in the project include continuing quality control, converting the scanned images into machine-readable text files, extracting individual cases into individual files, redacting headnotes and other editorial content, and finally making the redacted images and text files freely accessible online, which we hope to complete by the end of 2017.

We would be remiss if we did not once again thank our partner in this adventure, Ravel Law, without whose funding and support CAP would not have been possible. Thank you!

Book Talk: Heidi Gardner’s Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos, Mon. Jan. 30 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and discussion in celebration of Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos (Harvard Business Review Press, Jan 3. 2017) by Heidi K. Gardner, Lecturer on Law and Distinguished Fellow in the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School.  Copies of Smart Collaboration will be available for sale and Professor Gardner will be available for signing books at the end of her talk.

Heidi Gardner Book Talk Poster

Monday, January 30, 2016 at noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein West A (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

More About Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos

“Not all collaboration is smart. Make sure you do it right. Professional service firms face a serious challenge. Their clients increasingly need them to solve complex problems–everything from regulatory compliance to cybersecurity, the kinds of problems that only teams of multidisciplinary experts can tackle. Yet most firms have carved up their highly specialized, professional experts into narrowly defined practice areas, and collaborating across these silos is often messy, risky, and expensive. Unless you know why you’re collaborating and how to do it effectively, it may not be smart at all. That’s especially true for partners who have built their reputations and client rosters independently, not by working with peers. In “Smart Collaboration,” Heidi K. Gardner shows that firms earn higher margins, inspire greater client loyalty, attract and retain the best talent, and gain a competitive edge when specialists collaborate across functional boundaries. Gardner, a former McKinsey consultant and Harvard Business School professor now lecturing at Harvard Law School, has spent over a decade conducting in-depth studies of numerous global professional service firms. Her research with clients and the empirical results of her studies demonstrate clearly and convincingly that collaboration pays, for both professionals and their firms. But Gardner also offers powerful prescriptions for how leaders can foster collaboration, move to higher-margin work, increase client satisfaction, improve lateral hiring, decrease enterprise risk, engage workers to contribute their utmost, break down silos, and boost their bottom line. With case studies and real-world insights, “Smart Collaboration” delivers an authoritative case for the value of collaboration to today’s professionals, their firms, and their clients and shows you exactly how to achieve it.” — Harvard Business Review Press

About Heidi K. Gardner

Heidi K. Gardner, PhD, is a Distinguished Fellow in the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School.  She also serves as a Lecturer on Law and the Faculty Chair of the school’s Accelerated Leadership Program executive course.  She was previously on the faculty at Harvard Business School.  Gardner has also been awarded an International Research Fellowship at Oxford University’s Said Business School.

Dr. Gardner’s research focuses on leadership and collaboration in professional service firms, and her book Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos will be published by Harvard Business Press in January 2016.  Her research received the Academy of Management’s prize for Outstanding Practical Paper with Implications for Management. She has authored or co-authored more than fifty book chapters, case studies, and articles in scholarly and practitioner journals, including the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, and Harvard Business Review.  Her first book, Leadership for Lawyers: Essential Strategies for Law Firm Success was co-edited with Rebecca Normand-Hochman and published in 2015.

Dr. Gardner has lived and worked on four continents, including positions with McKinsey & Co. and Procter & Gamble, and as a Fulbright Scholar. She holds a BA in Japanese Studies from the University of Pennsylvania (summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa), a masters degree from the London School of Economics (with honors), and a second masters and doctorate in organizational behavior from London Business School.

Book Talk: Judge Robert L. Wilkins’ Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Mon., Sept. 19, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk in celebration of Judge Robert L. Wilkins recently published book,  Long Road to Hard Truth:  The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture Copies will be available for sale and Judge Wilkins will be available for signing books at the end of his talk.

Monday, September 19, 2016 at noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East A/B (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Judge Wilkins Book Talk Poster

 

Judge Wilkins was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on January 15, 2014. A native of Muncie Indiana, he obtained a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 1986 and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1989. Following law school, Judge Wilkins served as a law clerk to the Honorable Earl B. Gilliam of the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. In 1990, he joined the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, where he served first as a staff attorney in the trial and appellate divisions and later for several years as Special Litigation Chief. In 2002, he joined the law firm of Venable LLP as a partner, handling white-collar defense, intellectual property and complex civil litigation matters. During his tenure with the Public Defender Service and in private practice, Judge Wilkins served as the lead plaintiff in Wilkins, et al. v. State of Maryland, a landmark civil rights lawsuit that inspired nationwide legislative and executive reform of police stop-and-search practices and the collection of data regarding those practices. Judge Wilkins also played a key role in the establishment of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (scheduled to open in September 2016 on the National Mall), serving as the Chairman of the Site and Building Committee of the Presidential Commission whose work led to the Congressional authorization of the museum and the selection of its location. As a practicing lawyer, he was named one of the “40 under 40 most successful young litigators in America” by the National Law Journal (2002) and one of the “90 Greatest Washington Lawyers of the Last 30 Years” by the Legal Times (2008). On December 27, 2010, Judge Wilkins was appointed United States District Judge for the District of Columbia, where he served until his appointment to the D.C. Circuit.

More about Long Road to Hard Truth:  The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture

“In Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Robert L. Wilkins tells the story of how his curiosity about why there wasn’t a national museum dedicated to African American history and culture became an obsession – eventually leading him to quit his job as an attorney when his wife was seven months pregnant with their second child, and make it his mission to help the museum become a reality. Long Road to Hard Truth chronicles the early history, when staunch advocates sought to create a monument for Black soldiers fifty years after the end of the Civil War and in response to the pervasive indignities of the time, including lynching, Jim Crow segregation, and the slander of the racist film Birth of a Nation. The movement soon evolved to envision creating a national museum, and Wilkins follows the endless obstacles through the decades, culminating in his honor of becoming a member of the Presidential Commission that wrote the plan for creating the museum and how, with support of both Black and White Democrats and Republicans, Congress finally authorized the museum. In September 2016, exactly 100 years after the movement to create it began, the Smithsonian will open the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The book’s title is inspired in part by James Baldwin, who testified in Congress in 1968 that “My history . . . contains the truth about America. It is going to be hard to teach it.” Long Road to Hard Truth concludes that this journey took 100 years because many in America are unwilling to confront the history of America’s legacy of slavery and discrimination, and that the only reason this museum finally became a reality is that an unlikely, bipartisan coalition of political leaders had the courage and wisdom to declare that America could not, and should not, continue to evade the hard truth.” — booklife.com

Faculty Book Talk: Sanford Levinson’s An Argument Open to All: Reading “The Federalist” in the 21st Century, Wed., Dec. 2, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Visiting Professor Sanford Levinson’s recently published book,  An Argument Open to All: Reading “The Federalist” in the 21st Century (Yale U.  Press).

Wednesday, December 2, 2015 at noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein East B/C  (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

An Argument Open to All

 

Sanford Levinson, who holds the W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood, Jr. Centennial Chair in Law, joined the University of Texas Law School in 1980. Previously a member of the Department of Politics at Princeton University, he is also a Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas. The author of over 350 articles and book reviews in professional and popular journals–and a regular contributor to the popular blog Balkinization–Levinson is also the author of four books: Constitutional Faith (1988, winner of the Scribes Award); Written in Stone: Public Monuments in Changing Societies (1998); Wrestling With Diversity (2003); and, most recently, Our Undemocratic Constitution: Where the Constitution Goes Wrong (and How We the People Can Correct It)(2006); and, most recently, Framed: America’s 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance (2012). Edited or co-edited books include a leading constitutional law casebook, Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking (5th ed. 2006, with Paul Brest, Jack Balkin, Akhil Amar, and Reva Siegel); Reading Law and Literature: A Hermeneutic Reader (1988, with Steven Mallioux); Responding to Imperfection: The Theory and Practice of Constitutional Amendment (1995); Constitutional Stupidities, Constitutional Tragedies (1998, with William Eskridge); Legal Canons (2000, with Jack Balkin); The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion (2005, with Batholomew Sparrow); and Torture: A Collection (2004, revised paperback edition, 2006), which includes reflections on the morality, law, and politics of torture from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association in 2010. He has been a visiting faculty member of the Boston University, Georgetown, Harvard, New York University, and Yale law schools in the United States and has taught abroad in programs of law in London; Paris; Jerusalem; Auckland, New Zealand; and Melbourne, Australia.

Panelists:

Jill Lepore

 

 

Jill Lepore, David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History and Harvard College Professor

 

Eric Nelson

 

 

Eric Nelson, Robert M. Beren Professor of Government, Harvard University

 

 

Adrian Vermeule

 

 

Adrian Vermeule, John H. Watson, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

 

More about An Argument Open to All:

“In An Argument Open to All, renowned legal scholar Sanford Levinson takes a novel approach to what is perhaps America’s most famous political tract.  Rather than concern himself with the authors as historical figures, or how The Federalist helps us understand the original intent of the framers of the Constitution, Levinson examines each essay for the political wisdom it can offer us today. In eighty-five short essays, each keyed to a different essay in The Federalist, he considers such questions as whether present generations can rethink their constitutional arrangements; how much effort we should exert to preserve America’s traditional culture; and whether The Federalist’s arguments even suggest the desirability of world government.” — Yale U. Press

“Sanford Levinson has one of the most original minds in the American legal community, and it is on full display in this wonderful new book.”—  Alan Wolfe, Boston College

“Levinson’s brilliant short essays do much more than bring extraordinary insight to one of our most important Founding documents. They show how the questions posed by The Federalist are timeless, global and as compelling today as they were when written.  Levinson gives more relevance to The Federalist than it has had since 1788.   Fascinating and important.”—  Elliot Gerson, The Aspen Institute

“In his new examination of the Federalist Papers, Levinson lays out a powerful case for believing that the Founders, far from thinking government should be constrained, were focused instead on how to give it sufficient power to function effectively. Agree with him or not, Levinson’s is a brilliant and well-constructed brief for rethinking what our Founders were trying to say.”—  Former Congressman Mickey Edwards, author of “The Parties versus the People: How to Turn Republicans and Democrats into Americans”

Faculty Book Talk: Cass R. Sunstein’s “Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice,” Wed., Nov. 18 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Cass R. Sunstein’s recently published book, Choosing Not to Choose:  Understanding the Value of Choice (Oxford University Press).

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 12:00 noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein West A  (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

sunstein -- choosing not to choose

Cass R. Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations.

Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014) and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014). He is now working on group decisionmaking and various projects on the idea of liberty

Panelists:

David Laibson

 

 

David Laibson, Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics, Harvard University

 

 

Mark Tushnet

 

 

 

Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law

 

 

“Our ability to make choices is fundamental to our sense of ourselves as human beings, and essential to the political values of freedom-protecting nations. Whom we love; where we work; how we spend our time; what we buy; such choices define us in the eyes of ourselves and others, and much blood and ink has been spilt to establish and protect our rights to make them freely.

Choice can also be a burden. Our cognitive capacity to research and make the best decisions is limited, so every active choice comes at a cost. In modern life the requirement to make active choices can often be overwhelming. So, across broad areas of our lives, from health plans to energy suppliers, many of us choose not to choose. By following our default options, we save ourselves the costs of making active choices. By setting those options, governments and corporations dictate the outcomes for when we decide by default. This is among the most significant ways in which they effect social change, yet we are just beginning to understand the power and impact of default rules. Many central questions remain unanswered: When should governments set such defaults, and when should they insist on active choices? How should such defaults be made? What makes some defaults successful while others fail?

Cass R. Sunstein has long been at the forefront of developing public policy and regulation to use government power to encourage people to make better decisions. In this major new book, Choosing Not to Choose, he presents his most complete argument yet for how we should understand the value of choice, and when and how we should enable people to choose not to choose.

The onset of big data gives corporations and governments the power to make ever more sophisticated decisions on our behalf, defaulting us to buy the goods we predictably want, or vote for the parties and policies we predictably support. As consumers we are starting to embrace the benefits this can bring. But should we? What will be the long-term effects of limiting our active choices on our agency? And can such personalized defaults be imported from the marketplace to politics and the law? Confronting the challenging future of data-driven decision-making, Sunstein presents a manifesto for how personalized defaults should be used to enhance, rather than restrict, our freedom and well-being.” — Oxford University Press

Recent Reviews:  

“This book will profoundly alter the way you think about choices; the choices you make for yourself, the choices you make for others and the choices you allow others to make for you. With talent and ease Sunstein draws from politics, psychology, economics to help us understand ourselves and the world we live in, and how we may improve both. A delightful, thought provoking, read.” — Tali Sharot, Associate Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College, London

“From health care, education, and privacy, to travel, food, and finance, we face increasing arrays of choices. Occasionally, we have the knowledge and the bandwidth to choose well. Often, we do not. When are choices liberating, and bound to improve well-being? And when is it better not to choose? Should we worry about paternalism when others choose for us? And when we prefer not to choose, might it be paternalistic to require that we do so? Sunstein masterfully blends economic, legal, philosophical, and behavioral considerations to illuminate a topic of tremendous importance to policy making and to everyday life. Anyone who cares about the choices that they make should choose to read this book!” — Eldar Shafir, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, Princeton University

“There is no-one better placed than Cass Sunstein to make the case for Choosing Not to Choose. Drawing on the author’s own influential research and that of other experts, this book provides a deeply insightful exploration of both the value of choice and of not choosing. It is a must read for anyone interested in personal freedom and human wellbeing.” — Paul Dolan, Professor of Behavioral Science, The London School of Economics and Political Science

“In Choosing Not to Choose, Cass Sunstein provides the best analysis to date of the pros and cons of decision by default, making a strong case for personalized default rules in many domains. Readers will particularly appreciate the near-encyclopedic survey of empirical findings to help them identify the arenas of social life in which they will be better off or worse off by delegating decisions.” — Jon Elster, Robert K. Merton Professor of Social Science, Columbia University

“This monumental volume is the authoritative source on the subject. As anthropogenic climate change puts a deeper stamp on the planet, this book’s significance is certain to rise.” –– Jim Chen, Jurisdynamics Blog

Faculty Book Talk: Mark Tushnet’s “Unstable Constitutionalism: Law and Politics in South Asia,” Mon., Nov. 16 at 4 pm

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Mark Tushnet’s recently published book with co-editor Madhav Khosla, Unstable Constitutionalism: Law and Politics in South Asia (Cambridge University Press).

Monday, November 16, 2015 at 4:00 pm
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2009
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge  (Directions)

Refreshments will be served.  Co-sponsored with the South Asia Institute at Harvard University.

Tushnet -- Unstable Constitutionalism

 

Mark Tushnet is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.  He graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School and served as a law clerk to Justice Thurgood Marshall.  His research includes studies examining (skeptically) the practice of judicial review in the United States and around the world. He also writes in the area of legal and particularly constitutional history, with works on the development of civil rights law in the United States and (currently) a long-term project on the history of the Supreme Court in the 1930s.  His important works in the field of comparative constitutional law include Advanced Introduction to Comparative Constitutional Law (2014), The Routledge Handbook of Constitutional Law (co-edited, 2012) and the leading handbook, Weak Courts, Strong Rights: Judicial Review and Social Welfare Rights in Comparative Constitutional Law (2009).

Madhav Khosla is currently a PhD candidate at the Department of Government at Harvard University. He is the author of The Indian Constitution (2012) and is currently co-editing the Oxford Handbook of Indian Constitutional Law.

Panelists

Rohit De -- Yale

 

 

Rohit De, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Yale University and Research Scholar in Law, Yale Law School

 

Nichcolas Robinson -- Harvard

 

 

 

Nicholas Robinson, Resident Fellow, Harvard Law School Center on the Legal Profession

 

“Although the field of constitutional law has become increasingly comparative in recent years, its geographic focus has remained limited. South Asia, despite being the site of the world’s largest democracy and a vibrant if turbulent constitutionalism, is one of the important neglected regions within the field. This book remedies this lack of attention by providing a detailed examination of constitutional law and practice in five South Asian countries: India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. Identifying a common theme of volatile change, it develops the concept of “unstable constitutionalism,” studying the sources of instability alongside reactions and responses to it. By highlighting unique theoretical and practical questions in an underrepresented region, Unstable Constitutionalism constitutes an important step toward truly global constitutional scholarship.” — Cambridge University Press

Faculty Book Talk: Dean Martha Minow and Alex Whiting: The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints, Wed., Nov. 4 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Dean Martha Minow and Professor Alex Whiting’s new book, with co-editor C. Cora True-Frost, The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints (University of Michigan Press).

Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC Milstein East B/C (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

final poster minow whiting sm for blog

Martha Minow, the Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, has taught at Harvard Law School since 1981, where her courses include civil procedure, constitutional law, family law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence, law and education, nonprofit organizations, and the public law workshop. An expert in human rights and advocacy for members of racial and religious minorities and for women, children, and persons with disabilities, she also writes and teaches about privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict.

Professor True-Frost is Assistant Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law. She joins SUCOL from Harvard Law School, where she was a Climenko Fellow. Her scholarship draws from the areas of international relations theory, administrative law, and public international law. She teaches classes in international and domestic criminal law, international human rights law, and regulatory law and policy.

Professor True-Frost earned an LL.M. from Harvard Law School and a J.D./M.P.A. magna cum laude as one of two Law Fellows at SUCOL and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. She has worked in East Timor and Sierra Leone and led the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security at UN headquarters. She was also a litigation associate at Cravath, Swaine and Moore LLP. Prior to law school, she taught middle school in Baltimore and Harlem with the Teach for America program.

Alex Whiting is a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School where he teaches, writes and consults on domestic and international criminal prosecution issues. From 2010 until 2013, he was in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague where he served first as the Investigations Coordinator, overseeing all of the investigations in the office, and then as Prosecutions Coordinator, overseeing all of the office’s ongoing prosecutions. Before going to the ICC, Whiting taught for more than three years as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, again with a focus on prosecution subjects. From 2002-2007, he was a Trial Attorney and then a Senior Trial Attorney with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague. He was lead prosecution counsel in Prosecutor v. Fatmir Limaj, Isak Musliu, and Haradin Bala; Prosecutor v. Milan Martic; and Prosecutor v. Dragomir Miloševic. Before going to the ICTY, he was a U.S. federal prosecutor for ten years, first with the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division in Washington, D.C., and then with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Boston where he focused on organized crime and corruption cases. Whiting attended Yale College and Yale Law School, and clerked for Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of the Eastern District of New York. His publications include Dynamic Investigative Practice at the International Criminal Court, 76 Law and Contemporary Problems 163 (2014), International Criminal Law: Cases and Commentary (2011), co-authored with Antonio Cassese and two other authors, and In International Criminal Prosecutions, Justice Delayed Can Be Justice Delivered, 50 Harv. Int’l L. J. 323 (2009). ”

About The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints

“The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) gave rise to the first permanent Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), with independent powers of investigation and prosecution. Elected in 2003 for a nine-year term as the ICC’s first Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo established policies and practices for when and how to investigate, when to pursue prosecution, and how to obtain the cooperation of sovereign nations. He laid a foundation for the OTP’s involvement with the United Nations Security Council, state parties, nongovernmental organizations, victims, the accused, witnesses, and the media.

This volume of essays presents the first sustained examination of this unique office and offers a rare look into international justice. The contributors, ranging from legal scholars to practitioners of international law, explore the spectrum of options available to the OTP, the particular choices Moreno Ocampo made, and issues ripe for consideration as his successor, Fatou B. Bensouda, assumes her duties. The beginning of Bensouda’s term thus offers the perfect opportunity to examine the first Prosecutor’s singular efforts to strengthen international justice, in all its facets.” — University of Michigan Press

Recent Reviews:

“This book . . . offers a unique perspective on one of the most innovative international endeavors to end impunity for and prevent massive atrocities.”
—  Luis Moreno Ocampo (from the Prologue)

“The First Global Prosecutor admirably and distinctively fills a gap in the existing literature on the International Criminal Court. In bringing together essays by both leading scholars and prominent jurists in the field, Minow delivers a volume that is compendious in scope, rich with insight, and judicious in its conclusions. At once timely and important, The First Global Prosecutor offers a vital contribution to ongoing debates about the structure, function and practice of the world’s first truly global prosecutor.”
—  Lawrence Douglas, Amherst College

“There are only few works that deal in-depth with the legacy of the first years of the ICC. This volume combines ‘insider’ and ‘external’ perspectives on the first years of the Office of the Prosecutor. It captures major themes that have become relevant during Moreno Ocampo’s tenure and helps us understand the ‘light’ and ‘shadow’ of international criminal justice in situations of conflict.”
—  Carsten Stahn, Leiden University

Faculty Book Talk: I. Glenn Cohen and Holly Fernandez Lynch: FDA in the 21st Century: The Challenges of Regulating Drugs and New Technologies, Wednesday, October 28 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor I. Glenn Cohen and Holly Fernandez Lynch’s recently published book, FDA in the 21st Century: The Challenges of Regulating Drugs and New Technologies (Columbia University Press).

Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East C (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

FDA in the 21st Century

 

Ameet Sarpatwari

The talk will be moderated by Ameet Sarpatwari, Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Associate Epidemiologist, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

 

Book talk panelists include:

Aaron Seth Kesselheim

Aaron Seth Kesselheim, Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School, and Director of the Program On Regulation Therapeutic And the Law (PORTAL), Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

 

Daniel Carpenter

Daniel Carpenter, Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University, and Director of the Social Sciences program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

 

I. Glenn Cohen is Professor of Law and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology & Bioethics. He is one of the world’s leading experts on the intersection of bioethics (sometimes also called “medical ethics”) and the law, as well as health law. He also teaches civil procedure. Prof. Cohen’s current projects relate to health information technologies, mobile health, reproduction/reproductive technology, research ethics, rationing in law and medicine, health policy, FDA law and to medical tourism – the travel of patients who are residents of one country, the “home country,” to another country, the “destination country,” for medical treatment. His past work has included projects on end of life decision-making, FDA regulation and commodification.

He is the author of more than 70 articles and chapters and his award-winning work has appeared in leading legal (including the Stanford, Cornell, and Southern California Law Reviews), medical (including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA), bioethics (including the American Journal of Bioethics, the Hastings Center Report) and public health (the American Journal of Public Health) journals, as well as Op-Eds in the New York Times and Washington Post. Cohen is the editor of The Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Issues (Oxford University Press, 2013), the co-editor of Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future (MIT Press, 2014, co-edited with Holly Lynch, introduction available here), and the author of Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2014).

Cohen was selected as a Radcliffe Institute Fellow for the 2012-2013 year and by the Greenwall Foundation to receive a Faculty Scholar Award in Bioethics. He is currently one of the key co-investigators on a multi-million Football Players Health Study at Harvard which is committed to improving the health of NFL players. He leads the Ethics and Law initiative as part of the multi-million dollar NIH funded Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center program. He is also one of three editors-in-chief of the Journal of Law and the Biosciences, a peer-reviewed journal published by Oxford University Press.

Holly Fernandez Lynch is Executive Director of the Petrie-Flom Center. As Executive Director, Holly is responsible for oversight of the Center’s sponsored research portfolio, event programming, fellowships, student engagement, and a range of other projects and collaborations. She is Co-Lead of the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University, as well as Co-Lead of the Center’s Involvement with the Regulatory Foundations, Ethics, and Law Program of Harvard Catalyst, Harvard’s Clinical and Translational Science Center. In addition, she is Co-Editor of the Center’s collaborative health policy blog, Bill of Health.

Holly’s scholarship focuses on law, bioethics, and health policy, in particular the regulation and ethical conduct of research with human subjects domestically and internationally, pharmaceutical development and regulatory policy, conflicts of conscience in health care, medical professionalism, conflicts of interest, and religion in health care. She published Conflicts of Conscience in Health Care: An Institutional Compromise in 2008 (MIT Press), and released a co-edited volume from MIT Press in 2014 called Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future. She has served as Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, teaching a course on “Bioethics in the Courts,” as well as lecturer for Harvard Catalyst courses on “Introduction to Translational Medicine” and “Fundamentals of Clinical and Translational Research.” In 2014, Holly was appointed as a member of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 


 

“In its decades-long effort to assure the safety, efficacy, and security of medicines and other products, the Food and Drug Administration has struggled with issues of funding, proper associations with industry, and the balance between consumer choice and consumer protection. Today, these challenges are compounded by the pressures of globalization, the introduction of novel technologies, and fast-evolving threats to public health. With essays by leading scholars and government and private industry experts, FDA in the Twenty-First Century addresses perennial and new problems and the improvements the agency can make to better serve the public good.

The collection features essays on effective regulation in an era of globalization, consumer empowerment, and comparative effectiveness, as well as questions of data transparency, conflicts of interest, industry responsibility, and innovation policy, all with an emphasis on pharmaceuticals. The book also intervenes in the debate over off-label drug marketing and the proper role of the FDA before and after a drug goes on the market. Dealing honestly and thoroughly with the FDA’s successes and failures, contributors rethink the structure, function, and future of the agency and the effect policy innovations may have on regulatory institutions in other countries.” — Columbia University Press

Recent Reviews:

“The book contains a concise historical account of FDA regulation and insightful analyses of the major challenges the FDA will face over the next quarter century. The contributors, drawn from a variety of fields, are all authorities on the issues at hand. Although they certainly do not share the same opinions, their disagreements make the book remarkably balanced. Essential reading.” — Anup Malani, University of Chicago

“A truly magisterial collection, FDA in the 21st Century is a must-read for academics, practitioners, and social scientists interested in the future of drug and device regulation. The contributors offer thoughtful and well-researched policy approaches on conundrums facing the FDA itself, and similar agencies around the world. Bravo!” — Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland, Carey School of Law

“This insightful and informative book draws on a variety of perspectives to chart a course for FDA — and society — as we confront the challenges of medical product regulation in the 21st Century. It should be read by regulators and the regulated alike, as well as by patients, policymakers, payers, physicians, pharmacists — indeed, by anyone interested in human health.” — Daniel Troy, General Counsel, GlaxoSmithKline PLC; Chief Counsel, FDA, 2001-2004

“FDA in the 21st Century lives up to its title. Drawing on the historical evolution of the FDA, this book lays out, in a clear and thoughtful manner, the key questions for the future. At a time when scientific opportunities are presenting at lightning speed, and the expectations of the public for transparency, personalized medicine, and safety have never been greater, this is an important book.” — Amy Rick, Food & Drug Law Institute

Faculty Book Talk: Charles J. Ogletree Jr.’s The Enduring Legacy of Rodriguez: Creating New Pathways to Equal Educational Opportunity, Wed., Oct. 14 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and discussion by Professor Charles J. Ogletree Jr. with co-editor, Professor Kimberly Jenkins Robinson in celebration of their recently published book, The Enduring Legacy of Rodriguez: Creating New Pathways to Equal Educational Opportunity (Harvard Education Press).

Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East C (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

Ogletree poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“In this ambitious volume, leading legal and educational scholars examine San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez (1973), the landmark US Supreme Court decision that held that the Constitution does not guarantee equality of educational opportunity. Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., and Kimberly Jenkins Robinson have brought together a host of experts in their field to examine the road that led up to the Rodriguez decision, assess the successes and failures of the reforms that followed in its wake, and lay out an array of creative strategies for addressing the ongoing inequality of resources and socioeconomic segregation that perpetuate the inequity of opportunity in education.

Successive waves of school reform efforts have failed to counteract the pernicious effects of inequality on student learning and achievement. The widely perceived exhaustion of these conventional approaches has led to a renewed interest in the Rodriguez decision and its impact on efforts to improve educational opportunity and outcomes for all students. A timely volume, The Enduring Legacy of Rodriguez makes a comprehensive statement that will inform research and reform for the next generation of scholars, educators, lawyers, and policy makers.” — Harvard Education Press

Charles Ogletree, the Harvard Law School Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, and Founding and Executive Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, is a prominent legal theorist who has made an international reputation by taking a hard look at complex issues of law and by working to secure the rights guaranteed by the Constitution for everyone equally under the law. Professor Ogletree opened the offices of The Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice (www.charleshamiltonhouston.org) in September 2005 as a tribute to the legendary civil rights lawyer and mentor and teacher of such great civil rights lawyers as Thurgood Marshall and Oliver Hill. The Institute has engaged in a wide range of important educational, legal, and policy issues over the past 6 years.

Professor Ogletree is the author of several important books on race and justice. One of his most recent publication is a book co-edited with Professor Austin Sarat of Amherst College entitled Life without Parole: America’s New Death Penalty? (NYU Press, 2012). Other publications include The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class, and Crime in America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010). In November 2009, NYU Press published Professor Ogletree’s book, co-edited with Professor Austin Sarat, The Road to Abolition: The Future of Capital Punishment in the United States. Also edited with Austin Sarat, When Law Fails: Making Sense of Miscarriages of Justice and From Lynch Mobs to the Killing State: Race and the Death Penalty in America were published by NYU Press in January of 2009 and May of 2006 respectively. His historical memoir, All Deliberate Speed: Reflections on the First Half-Century of Brown v. Board of Education, was published by W.W. Norton & Company in April 2004. Professor Ogletree also co-authored Beyond the Rodney King Story: An Investigation of Police Conduct in Minority Communities (Northeastern University Press 1995).

Professor Kimberly Jenkins Robinson is a national expert on the federal role in education and equal educational opportunity and teaches and writes in the area of education law and policy. Professor Robinson is a researcher at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School. Her most recent article entitled Disrupting Education Federalism argues that the United States should reconstruct its understanding of education federalism to support a national effort to ensure equal access to an excellent education. This article is forthcoming in the Washington University Law Review in 2015. Her scholarship has appeared in the University of Chicago Law Review, Boston College Law Review, William and Mary Law Review, and UC Davis Law Review, among other venues. Prior to joining the Richmond Law faculty in 2010, Professor Robinson was an Associate Professor at Emory University School of Law and a visiting fellow at George Washington University Law School. She also served in the General Counsel’s Office of the United States Department of Education, where she helped draft federal policy on issues of race, sex, and disability discrimination. In addition, Professor Robinson represented school districts in school finance and constitutional law litigation as an associate with Hogan & Hartson, LLP (now Hogan Lovells). Professor Robinson is a frequent lecturer on education law and policy issues, including serving as the keynote speaker at the Is Education a Civil Right? conference at Harvard Law School in April 2013 and as the Dean’s Distinguished Lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in March 2014.

Recent reviews:

“Ogletree, Robinson, and their expert cowriters offer hope that this decision can be reversed or that other ways can be found to counter its ill effects. This book is a thoughtful and overdue contribution to improving schools.”  — Jack Jennings, author, Presidents, Congress, and the Public Schools

“There is an enduring tradition in this nation of relentless legal scholars who stand as champions for educational equity. This important volume follows in that tradition, deftly charting the future of educational opportunity.”  — Ronald F. Ferguson, faculty cochair and director, The Achievement Gap Initiative, Harvard University

“Ogletree and Robinson remind us that equalizing educational opportunity in the United States is going to require fundamental changes in law and policy from many directions, from how we allocate our financial resources to rethinking our housing policies. Their book makes a very important contribution toward broadening the conversation we’re having around reforming education.”  — Wendy Kopp, cofounder and CEO, Teach For All

“The Supreme Court’s effective abdication of any role in securing equal educational opportunity requires us to continue to grapple with the past, present, and future effects of the Rodriguez decision, and the essays here make essential contributions to that endeavor.”
Thomas A. Saenz, president and general counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund

Faculty Book Talk: Joseph W. Singer’s No Freedom without Regulation: The Hidden Lesson of the Subprime Crisis, Wed., Oct. 7 at noon.

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor Joseph W. Singer’s recently published book, No Freedom without Regulation: The Hidden Lesson of the Subprime Crisis (Yale University Press).

Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein West A (Directions)
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Lunch will be served.

Professor Joseph William Singer is the Bussey Professor of Law. He has been teaching at Harvard Law School since 1992. He was appointed Bussey Professor of Law in 2006. He began teaching at Boston University School of Law in 1984. Singer received a B.A. from Williams College in 1976, an A.M. in political science from Harvard in 1978, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1981. He clerked for Justice Morris Pashman on the Supreme Court of New Jersey from 1981 to 1982 and was an associate at the law firm of Palmer & Dodge in Boston, focusing on municipal law, from 1982 to 1984. He teaches and writes about property law, conflict of laws, federal Indian law. He also writes about legal theory with an emphasis on moral and political philosophy.

He has published more than 70 law review articles. He is one of the executive editors of the 2012 edition of Cohen’s Handbook of Federal Indian Law (with 2015 Supplement). He has written a casebook and a treatise on property law, as well as No Freedom Without Regulation: The Hidden Lesson of the Subprime Crisis (2015), Entitlement: The Paradoxes of Property (2000), and The Edges of the Field: Lessons on the Obligations of Ownership (2000).

Singer book talk poster

“Almost everyone who follows politics or economics agrees on one thing: more regulation means less freedom. Joseph William Singer, one of the world’s most respected experts on property law, explains why this understanding of regulation is simply wrong. While analysts as ideologically divided as Alan Greenspan and Joseph Stiglitz have framed regulatory questions as a matter of governments versus markets, Singer reminds us of what we’ve willfully forgotten: government is not inherently opposed to free markets or private property, but is, in fact, necessary to their very existence. Singer uses the recent subprime crisis to demonstrate:

Regulation’s essential importance for freedom and democracy
Why consumer protection laws are a basic pillar of economic freedom
How private property rests on a regulatory infrastructure
Why liberals and conservatives actually agree on these relationships far more than they disagree

This concise volume is essential reading for policy makers, philosophers, political theorists, economists, and financial professionals on both sides of the aisle.” — Yale University Press

Book talk panelists include Harvard Law School Professors:

Christine Desan

 

 

Christine A. Desan, Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law.

 

John C.P. Goldberg

 

 

John C.P. Goldberg, Eli Goldston Professor of Law.

 

Ken Mack

 

 

Kenneth W. Mack, Lawrence D. Biele Professor of Law.

 

Todd Rakoff

 

 

 

Todd D. Rakoff, Byrne Professor of Administrative Law.

 

Henry Smith

 

 

Henry E. Smith, Fessenden Professor of Law & Director, Project on the Foundations of Private Law.

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