Student Channel •

Banned Books Week Read-Out and more!

bbw-smallBanned Books Week is coming and we are excited! As librarians, the freedom to read is in our DNA. Every year scores of books have their places in libraries and schools challenged by would-be censors. We can’t stand that, but we can stand up for the freedom to read and you can join us!

Visit the HLS Library lobby during the week of September 26 for a display about local censors. “Banned in Boston” isn’t just an expression; the New England Watch & Ward Society records in our own collection (digitized in 2010) contain lists of “impure literature” that was banned in Boston (and beyond) during the 20th century.

Read-Out, Tuesday, September 27 at 12:15, HLS Library steps 
Bring your lunch and join us on the steps of the library as members of the HLS community read excerpts from our favorite banned books. We’ll be reading from classic literature, children’s picture books, and everything in between! If you’re HLS faculty, student, or staff and would like to be a reader, please contact Meg Kribble by Thursday, September 22 and we’ll add you to the line-up!

All week on Instagram!
Follow our Instagram for photos of HLS faculty, staff, and students with our favorite banned books. Share your own banned book selfies with #hlslbannedbooks! Not sure if your favorite has been banned or challenged? Check out the American Library Association’s Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books for 2015 and ALA’s Banned & Challenged Classics.

Find your zone at the HLS Library

zonesThe HLS Library is a big space and there are many things you can do hereread, study, write, work on a group project, snack, call your family, study some more, write some more…you get the picture. The trick is figuring out where to do each of those things without disturbing your fellow students, and that’s why we designated zones throughout the library buildings for specific activities.

Quiet zones are for quiet reading and study. Please keep noise to a minimum and take conversations to other zones. The Reading Room and most stacks areas are quiet zones.

Collaboration zones are for working in groups or talking quietly with others who are present. The Lemann Lounge, Microforms Room booths, 3rd floor group study rooms, and the Reference Room are all collaboration zones.

Phone zones are the only areas where talking on phones is permitted. Please keep ringers on silent. The Lemann Lounge, 4th floor computer labs, copy rooms, and the bridge to the Lewis Hall stacks are all phone zones.

Food zones are the only areas where food and snacks are allowed to be consumed. This is in order to keep mice and bugs away. The Lemann Lounge and Microforms Room booths are food zones. You may have drinks throughout the building, as long as they are in covered containers to prevent disaster should a spill happen.

Learn about Caselaw Access Project on the radio!

Two weeks ago, WBUR’s Bruce Gellerman and crew paid us a visit to record a segment on our Caselaw Access Project (CAP), which will make all U.S. case law freely accessible online. You may have heard the result this morning.

If you missed it or you’d like a replay, you can catch the story on WBUR’s website. Although the transcript appears in print along with some photos, we recommend listening to get the experience of what the process sounds like as well looks like!

Learn more about the Caselaw Access Project from our past CAP posts or our Library Innovation Law website.

 

You’re invited to Love Your Library Fest on September 23

HLS Students: we invite you to join us for the 12th annual Love Your Library Fest on Friday, September 23 from 2 to 5pm to learn more about your new library!

At Library Fest you will:

  • Learn about library services that students love
  • Get the scoop on how our Library Innovation Lab is making the law more accessible
  • Tell us how to improve our website
  • See unique items from our Historical & Special Collections
  • Meet our legal information vendors and staff from other Harvard libraries
Library Fest Heart by Alethea Jones

Art by Alethea Jones

Visit three or more stations to get a free movie ticket (HLS students only; one ticket per student) and for each station you visit, get an entry into our raffle for a Taste of New England gift basket (two each for JD and LLM/SJD students)–with a bonus raffle entry if you visit all stations! 10 additional HLS students will also win HLS Library book lamps for late-night reading.

In addition to the grand prizes, there will be candy, fortunes, treats, and other swag!

Mark your calendars and we’ll see you there!

Summer Reading 2016

At the end of last academic year, we used our bulletin board to ask you what you planned to read this summer. In case anyone out there has some beach time left this month, here are some of the highlights–check them out!

What else are you reading? Feel free to add your favorite summer 2016 reads in a comment.

Lectura Playa by Josué Goge on Flickr, CC:BY license

Lectura Playa by Josué Goge on Flickr, CC:BY license

852 RARE: Games People Play*

Believe it or not, Historical & Special Collections is home to some law-related games, including playing cards and materials created to help students learn the law. This set of educational cards, published in Halle, Germany in 1709, was intended to teach students civil law.

Civil Law Playing Cards

Chartae Iusoriae Juridicae (Halle, 1709), HOLLIS 3706209.

Our set consists of 34 cards, numbered 2 through 35. Each card contains several principles of civil law, written in Latin. The principles are numbered 5 through 194. It’s too bad the first card is missing from our set! Each card has been backed with marbled paper, and the whole set fits into a papier mâché box, also covered with marbled paper.

Case and Playing Cards

Case and Playing Cards, HOLLIS 3706209.

There is an eight-page instruction booklet, written in German, bound into marbled paper wrappers that match the playing cards. Students could use the cards as simple flash cards for self-study, or gather with a group of fellow students for a scintillating round of play. Here are a few excerpts from the instructions, translated by Jennifer Allison, an HLSL Foreign, Comparative, and International Law Librarian:

  1. Those who would like to familiarize themselves with these laws and repeat them at will / must start by learning the first law on a card / tam quoad numerum, quam quoad sensum, and discuss it with their fellow players / who do the same thing.
  2. Once this has happened / they both, or also four, five, and six [people] could … / sit together / shuffle the cards / and deal them out to each player.
  3. At this point, the person who received the first card starts / by asking his neighbor a question about one of the cards in his hand e.g. ex fol 8. An possessor rerum immobilium satisdare teneatur? If this person answers / quod sic; he has answered incorrectly and must take the card / and must read … out loud from it / so that the other players, ex auditu, can be informed of the law. …
Instruction Booklet

Instruction Booklet, HOLLIS 3706209.

Let’s hope they were drinking lots of beer. Nevertheless, it’s a good reminder that legal study aids – and the market for them – have been around for a long time. Good luck in your law school studies, whichever study method you choose!

*with apologies to Eric Berne

Get Your Fashion Fix!

The HLS Library’s exhibit, What (Not) to Wear: Fashion and the Law closes at 5 pm on Friday, August 12. Come learn about poisonous clothing, proper law attire, and fashionable litigation! The exhibit is on view weekdays from 9 to 5 in the Caspersen Room, fourth floor of Langdell Hall. See you there!

852 RARE Bonus Edition: The 25th Anniversary of Cohen v. Cowles Media

June 24, 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of Cohen v. Cowles Media Co., 501 U.S. 663 (1991), in which the U.S. Supreme Court decided that freedom of the press does not exempt journalists from following generally applicable laws. Dan Cohen (HLS ’61), a Republican campaign associate in the 1982 Minnesota governor’s race, gave information about another party’s candidate to reporters at two local newspapers. Though Cohen had received a promise of confidentiality from the reporters, the papers divulged his name. Cohen lost his job and sued the papers in state court, alleging breach of contract. Cohen won at trial and on appeal, but the Minnesota Supreme Court reversed. Cohen appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. The question before the Court was: Does the First Amendment bar a plaintiff from recovering damages, under state promissory estoppel law, for a newspaper’s breach of a promise of confidentiality? In a close 5-4 decision with two dissents, the Court ruled in favor of Mr. Cohen.

Cohen v. Cowles Media has been the subject of much debate and legal analysis in the past 25 years. It stands with New York Times v. Sullivan and a handful of others as a significant first amendment case involving the press.

Interested in learning more about what went on behind the scenes of this important case? Historical & Special Collections has the case files! Donated by Cohen’s attorney Elliot C. Rothenberg (HLS ’64), the collection consists of materials Mr. Rothenberg compiled and used in Cohen’s defense. HSC has many collections of case files, lawyers’ papers, and judges’ papers. If you are interested in a particular legal case, lawyer, or judge, search HOLLIS+ , the Harvard Library catalog.

HLS Class Marshal Elliot C. Rothenberg ('64). VIA record ID 8000950463

HLS Class Marshal Elliot C. Rothenberg (’64). VIA record ID 8000950463

We’re grateful to Mr. Rothenberg for sharing his collection with us, so we can share it with you. And his generosity does not end there: over the years, he has donated a number of HLS-related papers and artifacts to HSC, including the very baton he wielded as the Law School’s 1964 Class Marshal! Both baton and photo are on view through August 12, 2016 in the “academic regalia” section of the Library’s exhibit, What (Not) to Wear: Fashion and the Law.

Congrats to Robert Niles!

We’re happy to announce that a Harvard Law School student was among ten winners of the 2016 Bloomberg Law Write-On Competition. Robert Niles is in his final year of the J.D./M.B.A. program at Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School. His article, Did Reed v. Town of Gilbert Silence Commercial Speech Doctrine? Early Signs Point to No, was recently published in U.S. Law Week. Bloomberg Law subscribers can read it at the link.

Congratulations, Robert!

End of year guides to Bluebook and exams success

As another academic year winds to its end, we wanted to let you know about two new library guides that HLS students may find useful.

First, especially for LLM students who are finishing up their papers, but also useful for JD students doing scholarly writing, is our guide Bluebook Citation for LLM Students. This guide contains slides from the Library’s Bluebook classes, helpful charts, and frequently asked questions and answers, including dealing with non-English sources, American writing conventions, and what to do when the Bluebook doesn’t seem to have a rule for your type of source.

Second is our guide Prepare for HLS Exams intended for all students. This guide rounds up information and resources available in the Library and elsewhere at HLS that can help you successfully through one of the most stressful times in law school. It includes books at the library about taking law school exams, study guides and tools, guides to 1L topics, and ideas for short study breaks. We also include links out to general exam info at the Registrar’s office and the Dean of Student Office’s Wellness program.

We wish you success on finishing your papers, projects, and exams. As always, free earplugs are available at the reference and circulation desks!