Student Channel •

NY Times digital subscription update

the-new-york-times2Last year the HLS Library acquired a site license for the NYTimes.com. All HLS faculty, students, and staff may use this group pass to create an individual user account similar to the fee-based digital subscription for the NYTimes.com plus SmartPhone App.   

The renewal/registration process has changed. 

  • We moved our yearly group pass cycle from March 1 to August 1 to allow new grads 3 months’ access. If you joined our group pass last year, you will need to renew this spring and again on August 1.
  • Going forward, all HLS faculty, students and staff must renew (” grab a pass” in NYT lingo) every August 1 regardless of their initial registration date. 

If you need to renew your group pass now or in August:

  • Go to the HLS Group Pass link.
  • Enter your HLS Me credentials.
  • Choose the “Log in to Continue” button.
  • Enter your current username and password. You’re all set!

If you have never registered with NYTimes.com:

  • Go to the HLS Group Pass link.  
  • Enter your HLS Me credentials.
  • Follow the instructions to create an account and register for your new pass

If you have never registered for a group pass, but have registered an account with NYTimes.com:

  • Go to the HLS Group Pass link.
  • Enter your HLS Me credentials.
  • If you are already a non-paying subscriber (i.e. you are registered to received free 10 monthly articles), be sure to choose the “Log in to Continue” button. The group pass will be added to your existing account.
  • If you already have an existing paid subscription for digital access to the NYTimes.com you must first cancel your subscription before joining the HLS group pass. You may cancel your existing digital subscription by calling Customer Care at (800) 591-9233.
  • Paid subscribers will not be reimbursed for cancellation. You may want to time your registration accordingly.

Other points of note: 

  • Our group pass covers computers, laptops and SmartPhone devices only.  It will not work on your tablet apps, but it will work using your tablet’s browser.
  • Our site license is for the Law School only and it is not available to alumni.  

We hope you enjoy this resource. For assistance or questions, please contact the Library.

Brown Bag: PACER Campaign with Carl Malamud

Come hear about the Yo.YourHonor.Org campaign!
Brown Bag with cookies
Monday, April 6th, 12:30-1:30pm
Lewis 214B, Harvard Law School (maps)

Carl Malamud is visiting the Library to talk about the Yo.YourHonor.Org campaign currently underway to make U.S. District Court documents on the PACER system much more broadly available.

Carl Malamud is the founder of Public.Resource.Org, a non-profit that helps make the law more broadly available on the Internet. Working with Larry Lessig and Creative Commons, Public Resource made historical opinions of the U.S. Court of Appeals available for the first time. Working with Aaron Swartz, Public Resource did a comprehensive audit of District Court dockets for privacy violations. In the 1990s, Carl was responsible for putting the SEC’s EDGAR database and the U.S. Patent database on the Internet. Carl is the author of 8 professional reference books and is credited as the operator of the first radio station on the Internet. He received the Berkman Award in 2008. You might remember seeing him during our Law.gov events and Future of Law Libraries conference a few years back.

Early English Manor Rolls Go Online

Historical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that we have begun a multi-year project to conserve and digitize our collection of English manor rolls. The rolls came to Harvard over a century ago, purchased in 1892 and 1893 by Harvard Professor William James Ashley (1860-1927) from London bookseller James Coleman. In 1925 the College Library transferred the collection to the Harvard Law School Library.

The manor roll collection consists of 170 court-rolls, account-rolls, and other documents from various manors, ranging in date from 1282 to 1770. The largest concentration comes from the manor of Moulton in Cheshire. Other manors represented are Odiham Hundred, Hampshire; Herstmonceaux, Sussex; Chartley, Staffordshire; and Onehouse, Suffolk. A limited number of materials in this collection are single-sheet charters and one item is a map of the manor of Shelly, Suffolk.

Manor roll 16A (2)

Detail of roll from Moulton, Cheshire 1518-1521 (Box 2, 16)

 

For a complete description of the collection, see the finding aid, which will change and grow as digital images of the rolls become available, and links to them, along with improved descriptions of the rolls will be added. We expect this primary resource will be of particular interest to legal and local historians, students of early modern English history, and genealogists, all of whom have already used the rolls in their research. We also hope that by putting the rolls online, they will reach a broader audience who may pursue research questions that have not previously encompassed the manor rolls. We welcome your suggestions for improved descriptions; email specialc@law.harvard.edu with your feedback.

Library hours for spring break 2015

We will have slightly shorter hours next week over spring break:

Saturday, March 14: 9 am – 6 pm

Sunday, March 15: 9 am – 6 pm

Monday, March 16−Thursday, March 19:  8 am – 11 pm

Friday, March 20: 8 am – 8 pm

Saturday Mar 21 9 am – 6 pm

As always, you will continue to have access to Harvard e-resources offsite using your HUID and PIN. You can ask us questions by email, chat, and text as well as find frequently asked library and research questions at our Ask a Librarian site.

 

New Book Review Blog: The New Rambler

The New Rambler: an Online Review of Books may be of interest to our community. The New Rambler “publishes reviews of books about ideas, including literary fiction” and reviews to date cover books about history, opera, and philosophy.

While the topics are broad, the editors and reviewers include some familiar names in the law school world: The New Rambler’s editors include our own Adrian Vermeule, John H. Watson Professor of Law, as well as the University of Chicago Law School’s Eric Posner. In addition, HLS’s Cass Sunstein is one of the authors in the initial batch of reviews.

Check it out!

Coming soon: a new roof for Langdell Hall!

IMG_7059Close observers may have noticed the scaffolding and yellow clips around the top of Langdell Hall. We’re excited to share the news that the reason for them is that the Library is planning for a new acquisition this summer in the form of a new roof for Langdell Hall. We’re very much looking forward to having a fresh covering to keep both our collection and our patrons well protected.

Construction will begin right after Commencement and is projected to finish around Thanksgiving. As you might guess, there will be some noise disruption involved with this project. As we get closer to the start of the project, we’ll post additional information about noise mitigation measures.

Students: find a library liaison!

If you’re a student working on a journal or doing research for a faculty member, where do you start when you need help from the library?

One thing you can do is contact your journal’s or your faculty member’s official library liaison, who may already be familiar with their work or ongoing projects. But how do you find out who that is? For journal liaisons, visit the For Students section of our website, and select Journal Library Liaisons. To find your faculty member’s liaison, visit the For Faculty section of our website and type the faculty member’s name into the liaison finder form.

(You can, of course, also head to our Ask a Librarian page and contact us by phone, email, text, or chat. You can also request a research consultation for any kind of paper or project you are working on, be it for a journal or faculty or for your own research.)

Time to update your Westlaw passwords

Westlaw is requiring users to set new passwords during the week of February 1. This includes all HLS faculty, staff, and students (unless you registered for Westlaw after October 7.) If you change your password now, you won’t be required to change it next week.

To change your password now, simply log in and click update next to your name in the upper left of the page, then click on manage ONE PASS Profile and re-enter a new password, re-enter it again, and click save.

For more detailed steps, visit Westlaw’s instructions for changing or resetting your OnePass password (including a video). You may also call Westlaw at 1-800-WESTLAW for assistance.

New on HeinOnline: author profiles

Authors of law journal articles may be interested in a new feature at HeinOnline: Author Profile Pages, which show a list of works affiliated with a given author, as well as citation and access statistics, similar to those at SSRN. In addition, you can customize your Author Profile Page by adding your photo, affiliation, bio, and social media links.

HeinOnline used our own Dean Roscoe Pound as an example to illustrate how they look!

HeinOnline Author Profile of Roscoe Pound

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The form to customize your profile is easy to fill out–start by searching for your name as author in Hein’s Law Journal Library, click on it in the results, then click the submit author profile link. Step-by-step instructions are available at HeinOnline’s blog. Mine took just a few minutes to complete, and Hein sent me confirmation of the update within a couple hours.

Thanks to WisBlawg for the tip!

New Library Exhibit: Where Mis’ry Moans

Where Misry Moans for webHistorical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that its new exhibit “‘Where Mis’ry Moans': Four Prison Reformers in 18th & 19th Century England” is now on view in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall.

At the dawn of the eighteenth century English prisons were often dark, filthy, and rife with disease and suffering. Oversight was lax and inspections were rare at best. This exhibit focuses on four prison reformers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries—John Howard, George Onesiphorus Paul, Elizabeth Fry, and John T. Burt—who worked to make prisons more humane and reformatory.

Curated by Margaret Peachy and Mary Person, it will be on view in the Caspersen Room 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM through April 24, 2015. A companion website to this exhibit can be found here.