LLM Short Paper Research Sessions

In October we’re offering some classes for our LLM students writing the short paper. Come to any or all–sign up at the links!

Friday, Sep. 30th, 12-1pm
Areeda 524
In this class, we’ll discuss research resources for your LLM short paper related to arbitration, mediation, negotiation, and more.

Cyberlaw/Law & Technology/Internet Regulation
Friday, Oct. 7th, 4-5pm
Library Computer Lab
This session is designed for LLM short paper writers and will review resources relating to cyber law, law & technology, and internet regulation.

Public International Law/Human Rights
Sunday, Oct. 16th, 11am-12pm
Library Computer Lab
This session will focus on resources relating to Public International Law with a special focus on human rights. The session is designed for LLM short paper writers.

Corporate Law Resources
Friday, Oct. 21st, 12-1pm
Library Computer Lab
Come learn about some of the powerful resources for corporate law research.

852 RARE: Of Elks, Magicians, and Stone Cutters

Alexis de Tocqueville famously wrote that “Americans of all ages, all stations of life and all types of disposition are forever forming associations …” and a little known but intriguing collection here in Historical & Special Collections demonstrates just that.  It consists of constitutions and by-laws of a wide variety of American organizations, dating from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century.  The majority were part of a gift from the private collection of Roger Stoddard, former Curator of Rare Books at Houghton Library. From The Constitution of the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (printed in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1803) to the New programme and new constitution of the Revolutionary Communist Party, USA (Drafts for discussion) (Chicago, 1980) these pamphlets encompass nearly 200 years of American social, religious, trade, and political history.


They include organizations as diverse as the Charlestown Association for the Reformation of Morals (of Charlestown, Mass.) whose object as stated in its 1813 pamphlet was to “discountenance and suppress vice and wickedness generally, and to promote Christian virtue and morality … especially in the youth,” to the 1886 Constitution and by-laws of the Burlington Coasting Club of Burlington, VT,  whose object was “the encouragement and promotion of out door winter sports, such as Coasting, Toboggan Sliding, Snow-Shoeing, Ice Skating and Curling.”  Many of the pamphlets— such as By-laws of the Joint Association of Stone Cutters and Quarry Men (1888), and Constitution & by-laws of the Lynn & Boston R.R. Mutual Aid Association (1886)—were for associations that were precursors of modern workplace unions.



This is a somewhat hidden collection as catalog records for these rare and ephemeral pamphlets are often preliminary and brief, but the collection is open for research and we encourage you to explore it. These seemingly dry organizational documents actually provide fascinating snapshots of different times and places in American history. You can search this collection by doing a “Other call number “ search in HOLLIS Classic using the term “Constitutions and By-laws”.


Book Talk: Gillian Thomas with Judge Nancy Gertner, “Because of Sex,” Thur. Oct. 6, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and discussion in celebration of Gillian Thomas recently published book titled Because of Sex:  one law, ten cases, and fifty years that changed American women’s lives at work (St. Martin’s Press).

Copies of Because of Sex will be available for sale and Gillian Thomas will be available for signing books at the end of the talk.

Thursday, October 6, 2016 at noon.  Please feel free to bring your own lunch.

Harvard Law School Room Lewis 214A (Directions)

1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Gillian Thomas book talk poster

Gillian Thomas is a Senior Staff Attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union Women’s Rights Project. She previously litigated sex discrimination cases at the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Legal Momentum (formerly NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund). Her work has appeared in publications including The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic, and Slate, and she has been interviewed by NPR and The Wall Street Journal, among others. She’s a graduate of Yale University and the University of Michigan Law School, and lives in Brooklyn.

“The 1964 Civil Rights Act is best known as a monumental achievement of the civil rights movement, but few realize that it also revolutionized the lives of America’s working women. Title VII of the law made it illegal to discriminate “because of sex.” That simple phrase didn’t mean much, though, until ordinary women began using the law to get justice on the job—and some of them took their fights all the way to the Supreme Court. In Because of Sex: One Law, Ten Cases, and Fifty Years That Changed American Women’s Lives at Work , Gillian Thomas, a lawyer with the ACLU Women’s Rights Project, uses first person accounts and vivid narrative to tell the story of how one law, our highest court, and a few unsung heroines changed our country’s workplace forever.

Because of Sex takes readers through ten landmark sex discrimination cases that helped dismantle a “Mad Men” world where women could only hope to play supporting roles, where bosses’ leers and propositions were as much a part of the air women breathed as cigarette smoke, and where pregnancy meant getting a pink slip. Readers will meet Ida Phillips, denied an assembly line job because she had a preschool-age child; Kim Rawlinson, who fought to become a prison guard—a “man’s job”; Mechelle Vinson, who endured sexual abuse by her boss before “sexual harassment” even had a name; Ann Hopkins, denied partnership at a Big Eight accounting firm because the men in charge thought she needed “a course at charm school”; and most recently, Peggy Young, forced off her UPS delivery route while pregnant because she asked for a temporary reprieve from heavy lifting.

Today, women make up close to half of all American workers, and the majority of them have children. Women are visible at the top ranks of business, science, and journalism, to name just a few. A third of the justices on the Supreme Court now are women, and a woman president is inevitable—possibly imminent.

We never would have gotten here without Title VII. The law’s enactment in 1964 was just the beginning. What happened next is where Because of Sex begins.” — St. Martin’s Press


Nancy Gertner




Judge Nancy Gertner (Ret.), Senior Lecturer on Law



More about Because of Sex:  one law, ten cases, and fifty years that changed American women’s lives at work:

“Meticulously researched and rewarding to read. Thomas is a gifted storyteller.” — The New York Times

“Gives well-earned attention to women who remained unknown even as the causes they fought for gained support and the legal actions they brought entered the casebooks under their names.”  — Linda Greenhouse, The New York Review of Books

“Thomas writes with precision and grace (and a lovely lack of jargon) about 10 cases that established the full reach and scope of Title VII. The plaintiffs and attorneys she profiles … helped build the precedents that enable women to seek formerly male-only jobs, to work through marriage and parenthood, to be free from sexual harassment.”  ― The Boston Globe

“Compulsively readable … a moving and informative account of a struggle for equality that remains incomplete.” — Publishers Weekly


Book Talk: Stephen Davis, What They Do With Your Money: How the Financial System Fails Us and How to Fix It, Oct. 5, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Stephen Davis’ recently published book with co-authors Jon Lukomnik and David Pitt-Watson, What They Do With Your Money:  How the Financial System Fails Us and How to Fix It  (Yale Univ. Press).

Copies of What They Do With Your Money will be available for sale and the authors Davis and Lukomnik will be available for signing books at the end of the talk.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at noon.  Please feel free to bring your own lunch.
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein West A/B (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

What They Do With Your Money poster

Stephen Davis is Associate Director of the Harvard Law School Programs on Corporate Governance and Institutional Investors, and a senior fellow at the Program on Corporate Governance. He is also a nonresident senior fellow in governance at the Brookings Institution. From 2007-2012 he was executive director of the Yale School of Management’s Millstein Center for Corporate Governance and Performance and Lecturer on the SOM faculty.  Jon Lukomnik is Executive Director of the Investor Responsibility Research Center and David Pitt-Watson is the former head of the Hermes shareholder activist funds in Europe and an Executive Fellow of Finance at the London Business School.

“Each year we pay billions in fees to those who run our financial system. The money comes from our bank accounts, our pensions, our borrowing, and often we aren’t told that the money has been taken. These billions may be justified if the finance industry does a good job, but as this book shows, it too often fails us. Financial institutions regularly place their business interests first, charging for advice that does nothing to improve performance, employing short-term buying strategies that are corrosive to building long-term value, and sometimes even concealing both their practices and their investment strategies from investors.

In their previous prizewinning book, The New Capitalists, the authors demonstrated how ordinary people are working together to demand accountability from even the most powerful corporations. Here they explain how a tyranny of errant expertise, naive regulation, and a misreading of economics combine to impose a huge stealth tax on our savings and our economies. More important, the trio lay out an agenda for curtailing the misalignments that allow the financial industry to profit at our expense. With our financial future at stake, this is a book that analysts, economists, policy makers, and anyone with a retirement nest egg can’t afford to ignore.” — Yale University Press


Robert C. Clark



Robert C. Clark, Austin Wakeman Scott Professor of Law


Robert Eccles



Robert G. Eccles, Chairman of Arabesque Partners, formerly Professor of Management Practice at Harvard Business School


Nell Minow



Nell Minow, Vice Chair of ValueEdge Advisors


More About What They Do With Your Money:

“This excellent and well written book exposes the multiple leakages to various agents operating between savers and pensioners and the companies they are invested in as well as the problems of collective industry failure. It does not just make clear the problems and the often perverse incentives in the current system, but with clear “takeaways” after each chapter, the authors propose practical solutions from greater transparency to systemic regulation, with an outline of what a “People’s Pension Plan” and a “Common-Sense Bank” would look like. The book has insights for the individual investor as well as those in the industry interested in making the investment process fairer and more responsible.” — Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, former chairman of Royal Dutch Shell

“For those wishing to know what’s right with our financial system and how it can go wrong—or what’s wrong with it and how it can be set right, this is the book for you. Its return to common sense and the basics of finance is refreshing in a world too often characterized by obfuscation and complexity. Clear, concise, sensible, and incontrovertible.” —  Steve Lydenberg, Founder and CEO of The Investment Integration Project

“This book brilliantly describes what finance is for and shows how we, the people, who are the ultimate owners, can influence the system to meet our long-term needs.” — Dame Barbara Stocking, President, Murray Edwards College, Cambridge

“Davis, Lukomnik and Pitt-Watson paint a bleak picture of an out-of-control financial system that fails to serve the aspirations of ordinary individuals.  Not content simply to identify the problem, the authors propose creative (principles-based) solutions.  If you care about the role of finance in today’s economy, read this provocative, compelling book.” — David Swensen, Chief Investment Officer, Yale University

This fine book provides remarkable insights into what has gone wrong in our financial institutions and markets. In its call for action by us–we investors who collectively own corporate America–the authors offer clear and actionable steps that we can take to build a corporate world that serves our own interests, not Wall Street’s. —  John C. Bogle, founder and former chief, The Vanguard Group

“This is a clear and persuasive analysis of what is wrong with the financial system. The good news is that much of it is fixable, and this excellent book gives a compelling account of how.”— David Walker, Chairman of Winton Capital, former Chairman of Barclays

“As only insiders can, Davis, Lukomnik, and Pitt-Watson shine a spotlight on hidden cracks in the system that can still put hard-earned savings at risk. This is a vital book for anyone concerned about how to make the finance industry generate wealth for all of us.”— Former U.S. Senator Christopher Dodd

“Uncompromising in its critique and optimistic in its vision, What They Do With Your Money not only addresses the problems in the finance industry but offers practical solutions that can change the world for the better.” — Gordon Brown, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

“….the interests of the underlying clients of the finance industry—the depositors, the workers and the pensioners—should come first. Everyone is a capitalist these days. That means keeping a much closer eye on those who manage that capital”— The Economist

“A new book by three of the best thinkers in financial sustainability . . . does an outstanding job of fusing the public necessity and investor rationale for sustainable investment. . . . The timing of this book is impeccable, and it is required reading.”— Hugh Whelan, ESG Magazine

“A thoughtful, meticulously documented, and downright infuriating indictment of the American financial services industry.”— Nell Minow, Huffington Post


Banned Books Week Read-Out and more!

bbw-smallBanned Books Week is coming and we are excited! As librarians, the freedom to read is in our DNA. Every year scores of books have their places in libraries and schools challenged by would-be censors. We can’t stand that, but we can stand up for the freedom to read and you can join us!

Visit the HLS Library lobby during the week of September 26 for a display about local censors. “Banned in Boston” isn’t just an expression; the New England Watch & Ward Society records in our own collection (digitized in 2010) contain lists of “impure literature” that was banned in Boston (and beyond) during the 20th century.

Read-Out, Tuesday, September 27 at 12:15, HLS Library steps 
Bring your lunch and join us on the steps of the library as members of the HLS community read excerpts from our favorite banned books. We’ll be reading from classic literature, children’s picture books, and everything in between! If you’re HLS faculty, student, or staff and would like to be a reader, please contact Meg Kribble by Thursday, September 22 and we’ll add you to the line-up!

All week on Instagram!
Follow our Instagram for photos of HLS faculty, staff, and students with our favorite banned books. Share your own banned book selfies with #hlslbannedbooks! Not sure if your favorite has been banned or challenged? Check out the American Library Association’s Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books for 2015 and ALA’s Banned & Challenged Classics.

Faculty Book Talk: Henry J. Steiner’s Eyeing the World, Thur. Sept. 29, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a talk and discussion about a recently published photography book titled Eyeing the World by Henry J. Steiner, Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law, Emeritus, Harvard Law School.

Copies of Eyeing the World will be available for sale and Professor Steiner will be available for signing books at the end of his talk.

Thursday September 29, 2016 at noon, with lunch

Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East A (Directions)

1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Henry Steiner book talk poster

About the Photographer

“Early in my life, photography became a favorite pastime.  Over the decades its grip on my interests and time strengthened to the point that it turned into more than a hobby if less than a career.

My academic career involved international issues requiring foreign trips, particularly in the poorer developing countries.  Beyond their professional attraction, such travels fascinated me culturally and visually.  They offered eyefuls of people and nature that seemed at once familiar and novel, conventional and puzzling.  The desire was irresistible to search for and explore those eyefuls photographically after or between my trips’ scheduled events. In addition to these academic ventures, my vacations, hikes and treks gave occasion for most of the website’s images.

Over a half century, the subject matter of my photography remained markedly diverse.  It never concentrated on a particular theme, topic or region.  The vast majority of pictures on the website cannot be cabined within a particular ideology or purpose.  Nonetheless, certain underlying ideas and beliefs are common to many photos.  They suggest a deep relationship between my academic work and much of my photography.

Over the years, the photography predictably migrated from black-and-white to color, and from film to digital. Both trends heightened and broadened my engagement with picture-taking.  They indeed transformed my relationship to the entire practice of photography.

A few words about my principal career. The images in the book straddle the four decades during which I taught at Harvard Law School, as well as the most recent decade after I became professor emeritus. Over this period, international human rights became my principal commitment in scholarship, teaching and consulting. Today I continue to explore questions of human rights and pursue public interest projects, while engaging more systematically and intensely with this brave new world of digital photography.”  — Henry J. Steiner, April 2016

Find your zone at the HLS Library

zonesThe HLS Library is a big space and there are many things you can do hereread, study, write, work on a group project, snack, call your family, study some more, write some more…you get the picture. The trick is figuring out where to do each of those things without disturbing your fellow students, and that’s why we designated zones throughout the library buildings for specific activities.

Quiet zones are for quiet reading and study. Please keep noise to a minimum and take conversations to other zones. The Reading Room and most stacks areas are quiet zones.

Collaboration zones are for working in groups or talking quietly with others who are present. The Lemann Lounge, Microforms Room booths, 3rd floor group study rooms, and the Reference Room are all collaboration zones.

Phone zones are the only areas where talking on phones is permitted. Please keep ringers on silent. The Lemann Lounge, 4th floor computer labs, copy rooms, and the bridge to the Lewis Hall stacks are all phone zones.

Food zones are the only areas where food and snacks are allowed to be consumed. This is in order to keep mice and bugs away. The Lemann Lounge and Microforms Room booths are food zones. You may have drinks throughout the building, as long as they are in covered containers to prevent disaster should a spill happen.

Hiring! LIL wants your engineering energy!








Our Library Innovation Lab wants your engineering energy to make H2O even better!

H2O is an open source platform for creating free, open-licensed, remixable textbooks. It’s used by Jonathan Zittrain, Lawrence Lessig and many other faculty members and students at Harvard Law School and other schools. It’s poised for significant expansion and ready for an upgrade. Over the next two years, we’ll launch and scale a major new version of the H2O platform, and you will lead our efforts to improve H2O’s functionality, usability and reliability.

While you’ll primarily work in Ruby on Rails and Javascript in H2O, we’ll provide plenty of space for you to play. We’re a collaborative, experimental lab, and we want you to bring us your side projects and be excited about ours. This is a great spot for people who are enthusiastic about the web and the future of libraries.

We can’t wait to talk to you!

24/7 Library Access for HLS students

Rua 24 horas (24 hour street) by Morio, Wikimedia Commons

Rua 24 horas (24 hour street) by Morio, Wikimedia Commons

This one is for HLS students only! Today is the official start of library academic year hours, which means that the 2nd (main) floor of the library is now open to HLS students around the clock, except during certain longer break periods.

If you’d like to enter after hours, please come in either side at the back of the library where Langdell Hall connects with Areeda Hall. You will need your HUID for swipe access, and you’ll need to swipe again to get into the library proper. If you have any problem with your ID not working, please contact us and we’ll get you sorted out.

Our full hours during fall semester are:

Monday-Thursday 8am-12 midnight

Friday 8am-9pm

Saturday 9am-9pm

Sunday 9am-midnight

We hope you have a great year!

Book Talk: Judge Robert L. Wilkins’ Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Mon., Sept. 19, at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk in celebration of Judge Robert L. Wilkins recently published book,  Long Road to Hard Truth:  The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture Copies will be available for sale and Judge Wilkins will be available for signing books at the end of his talk.

Monday, September 19, 2016 at noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East A/B (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

Judge Wilkins Book Talk Poster


Judge Wilkins was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on January 15, 2014. A native of Muncie Indiana, he obtained a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 1986 and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1989. Following law school, Judge Wilkins served as a law clerk to the Honorable Earl B. Gilliam of the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. In 1990, he joined the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, where he served first as a staff attorney in the trial and appellate divisions and later for several years as Special Litigation Chief. In 2002, he joined the law firm of Venable LLP as a partner, handling white-collar defense, intellectual property and complex civil litigation matters. During his tenure with the Public Defender Service and in private practice, Judge Wilkins served as the lead plaintiff in Wilkins, et al. v. State of Maryland, a landmark civil rights lawsuit that inspired nationwide legislative and executive reform of police stop-and-search practices and the collection of data regarding those practices. Judge Wilkins also played a key role in the establishment of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (scheduled to open in September 2016 on the National Mall), serving as the Chairman of the Site and Building Committee of the Presidential Commission whose work led to the Congressional authorization of the museum and the selection of its location. As a practicing lawyer, he was named one of the “40 under 40 most successful young litigators in America” by the National Law Journal (2002) and one of the “90 Greatest Washington Lawyers of the Last 30 Years” by the Legal Times (2008). On December 27, 2010, Judge Wilkins was appointed United States District Judge for the District of Columbia, where he served until his appointment to the D.C. Circuit.

More about Long Road to Hard Truth:  The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture

“In Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Robert L. Wilkins tells the story of how his curiosity about why there wasn’t a national museum dedicated to African American history and culture became an obsession – eventually leading him to quit his job as an attorney when his wife was seven months pregnant with their second child, and make it his mission to help the museum become a reality. Long Road to Hard Truth chronicles the early history, when staunch advocates sought to create a monument for Black soldiers fifty years after the end of the Civil War and in response to the pervasive indignities of the time, including lynching, Jim Crow segregation, and the slander of the racist film Birth of a Nation. The movement soon evolved to envision creating a national museum, and Wilkins follows the endless obstacles through the decades, culminating in his honor of becoming a member of the Presidential Commission that wrote the plan for creating the museum and how, with support of both Black and White Democrats and Republicans, Congress finally authorized the museum. In September 2016, exactly 100 years after the movement to create it began, the Smithsonian will open the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The book’s title is inspired in part by James Baldwin, who testified in Congress in 1968 that “My history . . . contains the truth about America. It is going to be hard to teach it.” Long Road to Hard Truth concludes that this journey took 100 years because many in America are unwilling to confront the history of America’s legacy of slavery and discrimination, and that the only reason this museum finally became a reality is that an unlikely, bipartisan coalition of political leaders had the courage and wisdom to declare that America could not, and should not, continue to evade the hard truth.” — booklife.com