BloombergLaw • Et. Seq: The Harvard Law School Library Blog

1Ls – Database codes and Lexis/Westlaw training sessions

Hi 1Ls! You should have received the e-mail I sent out this past Wednesday, Aug. 28 and Thursday, Aug. 29 titled “HLS Library Database Registration Codes and Welcome”* This e-mail contains your registration codes and website links for Lexis, Westlaw and Bloomberg Law. You’ll need to have all three databases for LRW, so don’t wait until the last minute to register.

To help get you oriented to what their platforms have to offer, Lexis and Westlaw will be offering joint training sessions on Thursday, September 5 and Friday, September 6 in Austin Hall. Sign up for them here:

Thursday Sept 5th 12:00– 1:00pm Austin Hall -111 Classroom –West

Thursday Sept 5th 3:00- 4:00pm Austin Hall – 100 Classroom- North

Friday Sept 6th, 12:00-1:00pm  Austin Hall – 100 Classroom- North

*If you haven’t received it, check your spam folder. If you still don’t see it, or if you have any issues with registering for the databases, contact us at research@law.harvard.edu.

Researching Dockets and Court Filings

Happy new year!  I hope you had some wonderful, relaxing time off for the holidays and are getting ready to hit the ground running in 2019.

As many legal researchers know, researching court dockets to find criminal complaints and other filings can be frustrating and time-consuming.  While the subscription database BloombergLaw (https://www.bloomberglaw.com/) and its comprehensive docket database (including dockets for many state courts) has made docket research much easier than it used to be, it is always helpful to find a resource where this work has been done on the topic you are interested in already.  After all, there is no need to reinvent the wheel.

I recently found a great example of this.  The George Washington University Program on Extremism (https://extremism.gwu.edu) has created an online database of “criminal complaints, indictments, affidavits, and courtroom transcripts detailing Islamic State-related legal proceedings.” The database is available at https://extremism.gwu.edu/cases.

This is a very helpful resource for researching U.S. judicial proceedings in which criminal charges have been filed against suspected terrorists.  This database is organized alphabetically by defendant name, and, as of this writing, it includes entries for 168 cases.  Access to the database and its materials is freely available online.  The browsing interface is very clean and straightforward, and the PDFs of the scanned documents are of good quality and highly legible.

Looking for more information in general about researching court filings?  Check out our Records, Briefs, and Court Filings Research Guide at https://guides.library.harvard.edu/recordsandbriefs.

Also, the Yale Law Library has an excellent Docket Research Guide at https://library.law.yale.edu/guides/docket-research.

 

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