critical legal studies • Et. Seq: The Harvard Law School Library Blog

New Research Guide: Critical Legal Studies

My new research guide on Critical Legal Studies was published today. It is available at
https://guides.library.harvard.edu/critical-legal-studies.

The guide features selected books and other resources, along with pre-populated HOLLIS library catalog searches using relevant subject and general keywords, for each of the following topics:

  • Critical Race Theory
  • Latina/o/x Critical Theory
  • Asian Critical Theory
  • Critical Indigenous Studies
  • Critical Whiteness Studies
  • Feminist Legal Theory
  • Queer Legal Theory
  • Critical Disability Theory
  • Intersectionality
  • Critical Discourse Analysis

I spent several months creating this guide, and it was an enlightening and worthwhile project. Of course, I learned a lot about critical legal studies itself, never having taken a class that falls under this discipline. However, perhaps more importantly, I also discovered much about my own biases and pre-conceptions. My work on this guide compelled me to think critically and carefully about the language we use to describe these concepts in law, and how that language, while it may be helpful in finding materials in a library catalog, might be offensive or othering to researchers.

I hope that people will find this guide to be a helpful introduction to research in this vitally important field of study. I also hope that it provides a useful gateway to the enormous amount of critical studies resources, including books, journals, articles, and other items, in the Harvard Law Library’s collection and those of the other libraries here at Harvard.

New Title Spotlight: The Palgrave Handbook of Intersectionality in Public Policy

Palgrave Handbook of Intersectionality in Public Policy
Olena Hankivsky and Julia S. Jordan-Zachery, eds.
2019
ISBN 9783319984728
HOLLIS record:
http://id.lib.harvard.edu/alma/99153809319903941/catalog

A handbook on intersectionality in public policy might seem like a strange choice of a book to add to a law library collection. However, I disagree. For anyone considering a career that involves political leadership, lawmaking, regulatory affairs, community advocacy, or diplomacy, this book presents important information about how policy decisions impact people who face systemic societal disadvantages that may be overlooked or misunderstood.

“Intersectionality,” when used in a critical studies context, means the analysis of issues faced by people who identify with more than one (disadvantaged or marginalized) societal group. Because I am currently working on a critical legal studies research guide for the library, I have been thinking a lot about intersectionality lately. I have come to believe that it would be irresponsible to research an issue involving systemic discrimination or oppression without considering the issues faced by targeted groups in an intersectional way.

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