Announcements •

Faculty Book Talk: Intisar Rabb’s Doubt in Islamic Law: A History of Legal Maxims, Interpretation, and Islamic Criminal Law

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor Intisar Rabb’s recently published book, Doubt in Islamic Law: A History of Legal Maxims, Interpretation, and Islamic Criminal Law. 

Wednesday April 8, 2015, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Room WCC 2012. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Intisar A. Rabb is a Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and a director of its Islamic Legal Studies Program. She also holds an appointment as a Professor of History at Harvard University and as a Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She previously served as an Associate Professor at NYU Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and at NYU Law School, as Visiting Associate Professor of Islamic Legal Studies at Harvard Law School, and as a member of the law faculty at Boston College Law School—where she has taught courses in criminal law, legislation and theories of statutory interpretation, and Islamic law. She also served as a law clerk for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. She was named a 2010 Carnegie Scholar for research on issues of Islamic constitutionalism and contemporary law reform through processes of “internal critique” in the Muslim world, and a Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard for a project designed to add scholarly context to ongoing discussions of Islamic law in new media. She has published on Islamic law in historical and modern contexts, including an edited volume, Law and Tradition in Classical Islamic Thought (with Michael Cook et al., Palgrave 2013), and numerous articles on Islamic constitutionalism, Islamic legal maxims, and on the early history of the Qur’an text. She received a BA from Georgetown University, a JD from Yale Law School, and an MA and PhD from Princeton University. She has conducted research in Egypt, Iran, Syria, and elsewhere.

Doubt in Islamic Law

“This book considers an important and largely neglected area of Islamic law by exploring how medieval Muslim jurists resolved criminal cases that could not be proven beyond a doubt. Intisar A. Rabb calls into question a controversial popular notion about Islamic law today, which is that Islamic law is a divine legal tradition that has little room for discretion or doubt, particularly in Islamic criminal law. Despite its contemporary popularity, that notion turns out to have been far outside the mainstream of Islamic law for most of its history. Instead of rejecting doubt, medieval Muslim scholars largely embraced it. In fact, they used doubt to enlarge their own power and to construct Islamic criminal law itself. Through a close examination of legal, historical, and theological sources, and a range of illustrative case studies, this book shows that Muslim jurists developed a highly sophisticated and regulated system for dealing with Islam’s unique concept of doubt, which evolved from the seventh to the sixteenth century.” — Cambridge University Press

The book talk panel includes:

Roy Mottahedeh

 

 

 

Roy Mottahedeh
Gurney Professor of Islamic History
Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Harvard University

 

Adriaan Lanni

 

 

 

 

Adriaan
Professor of Law 
Harvard Law School

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty Book Talk: Gabriella Blum’s The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones? — Confronting A New Age of Threat, Wed. April 1 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor Gabriella Blum’s recently published book with Benjamin Wittes,  The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones? — Confronting A New Age of Threat.

Gabriella Blum is the Rita E. Hauser Professor of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at Harvard Law School, specializing in public international law, international negotiations, the law of armed conflict, and counterterrorism. She is also the Co-Director of the HLS-Brookings Project on Law and Security and a member of the Program on Negotiation Executive Board.

Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in the fall of 2005, Blum served for seven years as a Senior Legal Advisor in the International Law Department of the Military Advocate General’s Corps in the Israel Defense Forces, and for another year, as a Strategy Advisor to the Israeli National Security Council.

Blum is the author of Islands of Agreement: Managing Enduring Armed Rivalries, (Harvard University Press, 2007), and of Laws, Outlaws, and Terrorists (MIT Press, 2010) (co-authored with Philip Heymann and recipient of the Roy C. Palmer Civil Liberties Prize), as well as of journal articles in the fields of public international law and the law and morality of war.

Benjamin Wittes is senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and the editor-in-chief of Lawfare.

Wednesday April 1, 2015, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Room WCC 2012. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Future of Violence

“From drone warfare in the Middle East to digital spying by the National Security Agency, the U.S. government has harnessed the power of cutting-edge technology to awesome effect. But what happens when ordinary people have the same tools at their fingertips? Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology, and robotics mean that more people than ever before have access to potentially dangerous technologies—from drones to computer networks and biological agents—which could be used to attack states and private citizens alike.

In The Future of Violence, law and security experts Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum detail the myriad possibilities, challenges, and enormous risks present in the modern world, and argue that if our national governments can no longer adequately protect us from harm, they will lose their legitimacy. Consequently, governments, companies, and citizens must rethink their security efforts to protect lives and liberty. In this brave new world where many little brothers are as menacing as any Big Brother, safeguarding our liberty and privacy may require strong domestic and international surveillance and regulatory controls. Maintaining security in this world where anyone can attack anyone requires a global perspective, with more multinational forces and greater action to protect (and protect against) weaker states who do not yet have the capability to police their own people. Drawing on political thinkers from Thomas Hobbes to the Founders and beyond, Wittes and Blum show that, despite recent protestations to the contrary, security and liberty are mutually supportive, and that we must embrace one to ensure the other.

The Future of Violence is at once an introduction to our emerging world—one in which students can print guns with 3-D printers and scientists’ manipulations of viruses can be recreated and unleashed by ordinary people—and an authoritative blueprint for how government must adapt in order to survive and protect us.” — Basic Books

Book talk panelists include:

Yochai Benkler

 

Professor Yochai Benkler, Jack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Professor for Entrepreneurial Legal Studies and Faculty Co-Director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society

 

Jack Goldsmith

 

 

Professor Jack Goldsmith, Henry L. Shattuck Professor of Law

 

Jonathan Zittrain

Professor Jonathan Zittrain, Bemis Professor of International Law, Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources, Faculty Director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society, Professor of Computer Science, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Professor, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government

 

Kirkus
“[An] ambitious…treatise regarding a particular terror of modern life: the increasing ubiquity of potential harm spawned by technological transformations…. The authors raise fascinating questions…. A thoughtful…Cassandra warning of great vulnerabilities disguised as gifts.”

Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO of New America
“A book that manages to meld Hobbes, James Bond, science fiction, and Supreme Court decisions is a rare read. All the more impressive when it takes a complex set of urgent questions about the intersection of technology, security, and liberty, and offers insights and at least the beginnings of answers. Violence will be always with us, but its forms are changing in ways that challenge our ability to respond to and regulate it.”

Bruce Schneier, author of Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World
“Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum have written a compelling and provocative book about an important topic we have not adequately faced: managing catastrophic risk in a technologically advanced society. I strongly recommend this book even for people who will not agree with the authors’ conclusions.”

Matthew Olsen, former Director of the National Counterterrorism Center
“Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum provide a compelling and sobering argument that the rapid advancement and proliferation of new technologies—from cyber to biotech to robotics—have fundamentally altered our security. We face the prospect of a Hobbesian state of nature, where each individual is at once a figure of great power and great vulnerability. In this indispensable book, Wittes and Blum then tackle the staggering implications: What does this mean for the social contract between citizen and state and our traditional notions of liberty, privacy, and security? In short, can the modern state keep us safe?”

Early English Manor Rolls Go Online

Historical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that we have begun a multi-year project to conserve and digitize our collection of English manor rolls. The rolls came to Harvard over a century ago, purchased in 1892 and 1893 by Harvard Professor William James Ashley (1860-1927) from London bookseller James Coleman. In 1925 the College Library transferred the collection to the Harvard Law School Library.

The manor roll collection consists of 170 court-rolls, account-rolls, and other documents from various manors, ranging in date from 1282 to 1770. The largest concentration comes from the manor of Moulton in Cheshire. Other manors represented are Odiham Hundred, Hampshire; Herstmonceaux, Sussex; Chartley, Staffordshire; and Onehouse, Suffolk. A limited number of materials in this collection are single-sheet charters and one item is a map of the manor of Shelly, Suffolk.

Manor roll 16A (2)

Detail of roll from Moulton, Cheshire 1518-1521 (Box 2, 16)

 

For a complete description of the collection, see the finding aid, which will change and grow as digital images of the rolls become available, and links to them, along with improved descriptions of the rolls will be added. We expect this primary resource will be of particular interest to legal and local historians, students of early modern English history, and genealogists, all of whom have already used the rolls in their research. We also hope that by putting the rolls online, they will reach a broader audience who may pursue research questions that have not previously encompassed the manor rolls. We welcome your suggestions for improved descriptions; email specialc@law.harvard.edu with your feedback.

HLS access to National Law Journal and ALM publications

imgresGood news! The HLS community now has access to the National Law Journal, Supreme Court Brief, American Lawyer, and Corporate Counsel.

When you’re on campus, the regular URLs for each publication’s website should work seamlessly. While offsite, use the URLs above with your HUID/PIN to access full articles. You can also find the off-site links by searching for the publication titles in the Hollis catalogue.

Faculty Talk: Cass Sunstein on Nudging in the Real World, Wed. March 25 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a faculty talk to celebrate Professor Cass Sunstein’s recently published essay titled, Nudging:  A Very Short Guide, on Wednesday March 25, 2015 at 12:00 noon.   This brief essay offers a general introduction to the idea of nudging, along with a list of ten of the most important “nudges.” It also provides a short discussion of the question whether to create some kind of separate “behavioral insights unit,” capable of conducting its own research, or instead to rely on existing institutions.

Harvard Law School, Room WCC 2012. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Professor Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations.

Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014), Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014), and Wiser:  Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter (2015).

Nudging in the Real World

Spring classes on library resources and tools

Are you ready to spring into learning more about how library resources and tools can help you? If so, consider signing up for one of our upcoming research training classes. We’ll be having snacks and lunch at these sessions, so be sure to register!

Have thoughts about other class topics we should offer or timing of library classes? Please let us know!

Finding a Paper Topic
Wednesday, March 25, 5:00-5:30pm; cookies and snacks will be served
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Michelle Pearse
Find a great paper topic using library resources for inspiration.
Register now

Efficient/Free/Low-cost Legal Research
Monday, April 6, 12:00-12:45pm; Stonehearth pizza will be served
Location: WCC room 3013
Taught by: Carli Spina
Planning on government, non-profit, or public interest work? Learn the best sites and tips for legal research that won’t cost a lot.
Register now

Citation Tools
Tuesday, April 7, 12:00-12:45pm; Otto’s pizza will be served
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Claire DeMarco
Learn the pros and cons of Refworks and Zotero for storing and citing your research, plus learn how HLS’s new Perma.cc service can help preserve online sources in your citations.
Register now

Working with Hollis
Wednesday, April 8, 4:00-4:45pm; cookies and snacks will be served
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Aslihan Bulut
Learn to get the most out of the Library’s catalogue Hollis+ in this class covering basic and advanced search techniques for books, articles, finding aids, images, and more, plus learn when Hollis Classic can be helpful.
Register now

Beyond Lexis & Westlaw: Other Legal Databases
Thursday, April 9, 4:00pm – 4:45pm; cookies and snacks will be served
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Meg Kribble
Go beyond Lexis and Westlaw and learn how BNA, HeinOnline, Proquest Congressional, and other resources can be useful for research and helping you to stay current with the law.
Register now

Beyond Lexis and Westlaw: Non-legal Databases
Friday, April 10, 12:00-12:45pm; Otto’s pizza will be served
Location: Library conference room 524
Taught by: Jennifer Allison
Planning to do some interdisciplinary research? Learn search tips for general and specialty databases like Academic Search Premier, Business Source Complete, ERIC, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, PubMed, and others, plus how to find more databases.
Register now

Library hours for spring break 2015

We will have slightly shorter hours next week over spring break:

Saturday, March 14: 9 am – 6 pm

Sunday, March 15: 9 am – 6 pm

Monday, March 16−Thursday, March 19:  8 am – 11 pm

Friday, March 20: 8 am – 8 pm

Saturday Mar 21 9 am – 6 pm

As always, you will continue to have access to Harvard e-resources offsite using your HUID and PIN. You can ask us questions by email, chat, and text as well as find frequently asked library and research questions at our Ask a Librarian site.

 

New Book Review Blog: The New Rambler

The New Rambler: an Online Review of Books may be of interest to our community. The New Rambler “publishes reviews of books about ideas, including literary fiction” and reviews to date cover books about history, opera, and philosophy.

While the topics are broad, the editors and reviewers include some familiar names in the law school world: The New Rambler’s editors include our own Adrian Vermeule, John H. Watson Professor of Law, as well as the University of Chicago Law School’s Eric Posner. In addition, HLS’s Cass Sunstein is one of the authors in the initial batch of reviews.

Check it out!

New e-Resources

The Harvard Library has an astounding number of resources, with new titles coming in every day! For help efficiently navigating it all, make an appointment to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

Among our newest e-resources:

Note: “about” descriptions are taken from the resources themselves.

Flora of New Zealand

About: Our goal is to provide New Zealand with a dynamic, continually updated, electronically-based Flora. It will be based on new systematic research and will bring together information from our network of databases and online resources. Users will have easy access to the most authoritative, accurate, and up to date information on New Zealand plants.

The electronic Flora of New Zealand covers the New Zealand botanical region and includes flowering plants, gymnosperms, ferns, and bryophytes. It includes naturalized as well as indigenous plants.

Oxford Handbooks Online. Literature

About: Oxford Handbooks Online brings together the world’s leading scholars to write review essays that evaluate the current thinking on a field or topic, and make an original argument about the future direction of the debate. The Oxford Handbooks are one of the most successful and cited series within scholarly publishing, containing in-depth, high-level articles by scholars at the top of their field.

CMIE States of India

About: A Comprehensive compilation of State-level Statistics, supported by Official Statistical documents from State governments. From the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy.

Digitalia Hispanica

About: a Hispanic Database of ebooks and ejournals where you will find the broadest access to high-quality content in Spanish Language. Thousands of ebooks from the most renowned Spanish and Latinamerican Publishing Houses, as well as relevant journals that cover all topics of interest.

Justice with Michael Sandel

About: JUSTICE is the first Harvard course to be made freely available online and on public television. Nearly a thousand students pack Harvard’s historic Sanders Theatre to hear Michael Sandel, “perhaps the most prominent college professor in America,” (Washington Post) talk about justice, equality, democracy, and citizenship.

Oliveira Lima Library

About: Originally the personal library of the Brazilian diplomat, historian, and journalist Manoel de Oliveira Lima–the Oliveira Lima Library–has long been regarded as one of the finest collections of Luso-Brazilian materials available to scholars. Now this collection of rare and unique pamphlets is more available than ever, thanks to Gale’s partnership with the library to digitize this content and present it in their new archive, Brazilian and Portuguese History and Culture: The Oliveira Lima Library. Spanning the “long” 19th century, this collection turns the spotlight on Latin America’s largest and most influential power, covering topics such as colonialism, the Brazilian independence period, slavery and abolition, the Catholic Church, indigenous peoples, immigration, ecology, agriculture, economic development, medicine and public health, international relations, and Brazilian and Portuguese literature.

Southeast Asia Digital Library

About: The Southeast Asia Digital Library (SEADL) exists to provide educators and their students, as well as scholars and members of the general public, with a wide variety of materials published or otherwise produced in Southeast Asia. Drawn largely from the collections of universities and individual scholars in this region, the SEADL contains digital facsimiles of books and manuscripts, as well as multimedia materials and searchable indexes of additional Southeast Asian resources. Nations represented in the collection include Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam.

AAPG [American Association of Petroleum Geologists] Datapages

About: Acting as the digital publisher for AAPG and the geoscience community, Datapages archives and catalogs geological publications and offers them for purchase in multiple electronic formats, including the services of the Archives, Search and Discovery, and Datapages Exploration Objects (DEO).

Digitalia Film Library

About: Digitalia presents its Film on stream service for Libraries with the best cinema and documentary collections from Europe and the Americas. Genres include action, adventure, musicals, and westerns. Documentary collections include anthropology, social commentary, history, and travel.

Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Human Evolution

About: This comprehensive A to Z encyclopedia provides extensive coverage of important scientific terms related to improving our understanding of how we evolved. Specifically, the 5,000 entries cover evidence and methods used to investigate the relationships among the living great apes, evidence about what makes the behavior of modern humans distinctive, and evidence about the evolutionary history of that distinctiveness, as well as information about modern methods used to trace the recent evolutionary history of modern human populations. This text provides a resource for everyone studying the emergence of Homo sapiens.

You can also view our list of recently activated e-journals.

Faculty Book Talk: I. Glenn Cohen’s, Identified Versus Statistical Lives, Wednesday, March 11 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor I. Glenn Cohen’s recently published book with co-editors Norman Daniels and Nir Eyal, Identified Versus Statistical Lives:  An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

Free download of the introduction from SSRN!

Wednesday March 11, 2015, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Room WCC 2012. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.  

Four copies of the book will be given away during this book talk.

I. Glenn Cohen is Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics. He is one of the world’s leading experts on the intersection of bioethics (or medical ethics), and the law, as well as health law. He also teaches civil procedure. Prior to becoming a professor, he served as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and as a lawyer for U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, Appellate Staff, where he handled litigation in the Courts of Appeals and in the U.S. Supreme Court. He was selected as a Radcliffe Institute Fellow (2012-2013) and by the Greenwall Foundation to receive a Faculty Scholar Award in Bioethics. He also leads the Ethics and Law initiative as part of the multi-million dollar NIH funded Harvard Catalyst for The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center program. Professor Cohen is the author of more than 60 articles and chapters, and his award-winning work has appeared in leading legal law review journals including: Stanford, Cornell, and Southern California; medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, and JAMA; bioethics journals including the American Journal of Bioethics, the Hastings Center Report; and for public health, the American Journal of Public Health. He is the editor of The Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Issues (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Identified Versus Statistical Lives  Poster

“On August 5, 2010, a cave-in left thirty-three Chilean miners trapped underground. The Chilean government embarked on a massive rescue effort that is estimated to have cost between ten and twenty million dollars.  There is a puzzle here. Many mine safety measures that would have been more cost effective had not been taken in Chile earlier, either by the mining companies, the Chilean government or by international donors. The Chilean story illustrates a persistent puzzle: the identified lives effect. Human beings show a greater inclination to assist persons and groups identified as those at high risk of great harm than to assist persons and groups who will suffer — or already suffer — similar harm but are not identified as yet. The problem touches almost every aspect of human life and politics: health, the environment, the law.  What can social and cognitive sciences teach us about the origin and triggers of the effect? Philosophically and ethically, is the effect a “bias” to be eliminated or is it morally justified? What implications does the effect have for health care, law, the environment and other practice domains?  This volume is the first book to tackle the effect from all necessary perspectives: psychology, public health, law, ethics, and public policy.”  — Oxford University Press

Book talk panelists include:

Norman Daniels

 

 

Professor Norman Daniels is Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health.

Nir EyalProfessor Nir Eyal is Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine (Bioethics) at the Harvard Medical School. He is also appointed at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health Department of Global Health and Population, and at the Harvard University Program in Ethics and Health.