Announcements •

852 Rare: Finding Some Cheer in a Sad Book

Every once in a while we find a book in Historical & Special Collections that would make even the most cold-hearted among us feel sorry for the poor thing. Pictured below is a scrapbook of newspaper clippings assembled by Eugene Wambaugh, an HLS faculty member who taught at the school in the early-twentieth century.

EugeneWambaughScrapbook_HOLLIS4180741

Eugene Wambaugh’s “Scrapbook of newspaper clippings relating to federal and local economic and political problems, 1884-1887.” HOLLIS 4180741

The front board (cover) is completely detached, along with several of the first pages, newspaper clippings jut out at both the top and bottom of the volume, and large stacks of clippings between pages have put a great deal of pressure on the spine. The newspaper clippings are also what we might call “chippy,” meaning that small pieces of paper are liable to flake off from the edges. [Read More]

New [And Improved] Title Spotlight: World Criminal Justice Systems: A Comparative Survey (9th ed.)

This time around, rather than looking at a brand new publication, I have decided to focus on the new edition of a treatise that was first published in 1984:

World Criminal Justice Systems: A Comparative Survey
Richard J. Terrill
9th edition, 2016
Law Library Reference Reading Room (Langdell 4th Floor), REF HV 7419 .T47 2016

This is not strictly a legal treatise, although much of its content will be of interest to comparative criminal law researchers. Instead, it focuses on the field of study of “criminal justice,” which according to the author encompasses several academic disciplines, including “[s]ociology, psychology, law, and public administration[.]” (Introduction, at 1)

The author makes it clear that this work facilitates the reader’s comparative analysis of the jurisdictions and legal systems surveyed, rather than providing its own. The book is targeted toward researchers with knowledge of the American criminal justice system; accordingly, the United States is not one of the featured jurisdictions. However, even non-U.S. researchers will likely find its clear, informative contents to be very valuable for introductory purposes.

For each of the jurisdictions covered (England, France, Japan, South Africa, Russia, and China), the author provides an informative overview of the government, the police, the judiciary, the law, the correctional system, and juvenile justice.  In addition, a chapter on Islamic Law was first added to the 8th edition in 2013. In this new edition, this chapter discusses the historical development of Islam and Sharia, and illustrates criminal justice principles in Islamic law countries using three “contemporary case studies” (Saudi Arabia, Iran, and Turkey).

As the author explains in the introduction (pp. 7-9), when considering which jurisdictions to include, he focused on the evolution of their legal systems. In particular, he references “legal families”: while England represents common law; the “Romano-Germanic” tradition is represented by France as an original jurisdiction, as well as “borrowers” to varying degrees: Japan, South Africa, and the Russian Federation. The latter is also an example of a jurisdiction in the “socialist law” family, together with China. Finally, in adding the Islamic Law content, the author’s intention was not only to provide a view into criminal justice in “theocratic” societies, but also to focus on “countries [that] view the purpose and function of law in a different context from that which emerged in the West.”

In addition to its substantive content, the real value of this book to the researcher is its extensive bibliography of English-language sources, including books and scholarly articles, for each jurisdiction/legal system it covers.  Altogether, it is an excellent introductory source for legal researchers who are interested in researching any aspect of the criminal justice system in a comparative context.

Our Soccer/Football Law Research Guide is Back!

After spending some time on the bench recently, the law library’s research guide The Beautiful Game: The Law of Soccer / Football is back on the pitch!

The guide has been updated, streamlined, and declared match-fit, just in time for the Euro 2016 and Copa America 2016 tournaments that are taking place this month.

Check it out at http://guides.library.harvard.edu/football-law.

New Title Spotlight: Restorative Justice and Mediation in Penal Matters

It’s been a great month for discovering new titles in our collection that will appeal to comparative law researchers! The latest title that caught my eye provides a survey of criminal justice ADR practice in 36 (36!) European countries:

Restorative Justice and Mediation in Penal Matters: A Stock-Taking of Legal Issues, Implementation Strategies and Outcomes in 36 European Countries
Frieder Dünkel, Joanna Grzywa-Holten, Philip Horsfield (eds.)
Forum Verlag Godesberg, 2015
(2 volumes)

The editors’ goal in compiling this collection was to “know what there is in Europe today in terms of [Restorative Justice] RJ in penal matters, what the driving forces have been for introducing RJ, how it has been implemented in legislation and on the ground, and what role it plays (central or peripheral) in criminal justice practice.” (p. 3)

Each country report includes an in-depth discussion of active and proposed Victim Offender Mediation (VOM) programs for both adult and juvenile offenders.

Highlights include:

Austria’s NEUSTART program includes three options: “VOM, community service, and probation assistance.”  The use of VOM has been studied there for several years and has shown interesting results, including the public prosecutor dismissing criminal charges in 78% of cases in which VOM was used. (pp. 34-35)

The laws of the Czech Republic provide several RJ-oriented options to “the full range of criminal justice stakeholders: the police, public prosecutors, Probation and Mediation Service, offenders, and victims[.]” These include VOM, conciliation (narovnání) hearings, and both “conditional discontinuance” and abandonment of criminal prosecution. (pp. 171-74)

In Finland, “[f]our structures serve the interests of the victim’ restorative needs[,]”:

  • Insurance and civil law compensation schemes
  • The state compensation system
  • Diversion in the form of non-prosecution
  • Mediation

The Finnish government has an extensive network of agencies to oversee and facilitate mediation in criminal cases, including “the Ministry of Social and Welfare Affairs…, the Advisory Board on Mediation in Criminal Cases, the mediation office, and the mediation officer in charge.” The use of mediation in Finnish criminal cases has been extensively researched, and data about mediation participants and their relative satisfaction with the mediation process is included in the report. (pp. 243-62)

Romania’s Law on Mediation and the Mediator Profession (Law No. 192/2006, published in the Official Gazette No. 441 on May 22, 2006) “regulates…the procedure and characteristics of mediation in penal matters.”  This law was amended in 2009 (Law 370/2009), “introduc[ing] the duty of justice officials to inform the parties about the availability of mediation.” The report provides an extensive explanation of the statutory requirements for the mediation process required under this law, and it also discusses the results of 2010 survey of public prosecutors and judges regarding the use and acceptance of VOM in criminal proceedings. (pp. 697-719)

The report from Ukraine features a discussion of the work done to advocate for the use of RJ in criminal proceedings by “civil society organizations,” including the Ukrainian Centre for Common Ground (UCCG). This organization first introduced a pilot program of VOM in criminal cases in Ukraine in 2003. Currently, the UCCG’s work includes providing training for mediators who offer mediation services in the 14 Community Restorative Justice Centres (CRJCs) across the country. (pp. 989-1005)

This resource provides a wealth of information for comparative research of criminal justice, ADR, and European legislation. Each report is highly readable and helpfully annotated with primary and secondary source references.  The national experts who wrote these reports have done us a real service in contributing their knowledge to these volumes. It is definitely worth a look if your interests lie in any of these areas.

New Title Spotlight – Arbitration in Africa: A Review of Key Jurisdictions

The law library recently added an important title to its collection for foreign and international arbitration research:

An Introduction to Arbitration in Africa: A Review of Key Jurisdictions
John Miles, Tunde Fagbohunlu SAN and Kamal Rasiklal Shah
Sweet and Maxwell, 2016
Law Library Lewis/ILS basement stacks, KQC500 .M55 2016

This book provides information about the legal systems and arbitration laws and procedures (including enforcement and appeal of arbitration awards) of many African jurisdictions. It is organized as follows:

Arbitration in Africa: A Review of Key Jurisdictions, by John Miles, Tunde Fagbohunlu SAN and Kamal Rasiklal Shah (2016)

North Africa:

Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia

The East African Community and Ethiopia:

Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda

Southern Africa:

Botswana, Malawi, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe

English-Speaking West Africa:

Ghana, Nigeria

African Lusophone Countries:

Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique

The Islands of Africa:

Cape Verde, Madagascar, Mauritius, Sao Tome and Principe

Arbitration under the OHADA System:

Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon, Guinea (Conakry), Togo

The book also provides a list of African countries that are signatories to the ICSID convention, and lists of the bilateral investment treaties (BITs) into which African countries have entered.

Open for research: The Records of the Cambridge Tenants’ Union

Historical & Special Collections is pleased to announce the opening of a new modern manuscript collection for research — the Records of the Cambridge Tenants’ Union.

Flyer, Cambridge Tenants' Union. Records, 1967-1999, Box 10, folder 5

Flyer, Cambridge Tenants’ Union. Records, 1967-1999, Box 10, folder 5

 

The Cambridge Tenant’s Union (CTU) Records cover the entirety of the organization’s period as an active group in Cambridge, Massachusetts from 1986 – 1999. There are also documents from the group’s predecessor, the Cambridge Rent Control Coalition, dating back to 1967. The bulk of this collection is organizational records and materials related to the Cambridge Tenants’ Union’s political and legal activism. Also included are studies and reports, involvement with other groups, and press coverage of relevant issues. The majority of the collection is textual, comprising of correspondence, logs, petitions, flyers, publications, questionnaires, pamphlets, studies, clippings, newspapers, and related printed matter. Other formats present are a small number of items such as buttons, postcards, and cassette tapes.

The Records of the Cambridge Tenants’ Union is open to all researchers. Anyone interested in using the collection should contact Historical & Special Collections to schedule an appointment.

Posted on behalf of Rachel Scavera by Edwin Moloy.

 

Book Series Spotlight: German Law Accessible

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Tax Law in Germany (2nd Edition, 2016)

The law library’s collection includes many English-language materials on German law. One especially helpful resource is the German Law Accessible series of books, published by the German legal publisher C.H. Beck.

Many of the titles in the German Law Accessible series focus on subjects related to commercial/business law. The most recent title in this series is no exception – it is the 2016 2nd edition of Tax Law in Germany (3rd floor of the Law Library’s ILS/Lewis Collection, call number KK7105.8 .H33 2016). Its authors, Florian Haase and Daniela Steierberg, are tax law experts in the Hamburg office of the international financial consulting firm Rödl & Partner.

In the introduction, the authors describe their book as being “written from a practitioner’s perspective…[offering] a succinct description of the law together with lots of examples.”  However, despite its practitioner-oriented focus, this book provides an ideal opportunity for academic researchers who do not read German to learn about taxation in Germany.  Subjects covered in the books include an overview of the German legal tax system, taxation issues related to corporations and partnerships, special tax problems involving cross-border investments, transfer pricing, and much more.

For more information about researching German law at HLS, visit our German Law Research Guide at http://guides.library.harvard.edu/GermanLaw.

Congrats to Robert Niles!

We’re happy to announce that a Harvard Law School student was among ten winners of the 2016 Bloomberg Law Write-On Competition. Robert Niles is in his final year of the J.D./M.B.A. program at Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School. His article, Did Reed v. Town of Gilbert Silence Commercial Speech Doctrine? Early Signs Point to No, was recently published in U.S. Law Week. Bloomberg Law subscribers can read it at the link.

Congratulations, Robert!

Summer 2016 Access to Legal Research Databases and More

Got questions about using your Bloomberg, Lexis, or Westlaw accounts over the summer?  Here’s what you need to know about using each of the legal research databases.

BLOOMBERG LAW
If your workplace has a Bloomberg Law account, you are expected to use that, but there are no restrictions on your HLS Bloomberg accounts over the summer. Need an account? Just sign up with your HLS email address.

For questions and assistance, please contact our Bloomberg rep, Eric Malinowski.

LEXIS 
Your law school ID will let you access Lexis Advance all summer for:

  • Academic, professional, and non-profit research (note: some employers may give you an ID to use for work purposes)
  • All legal content and news you have as a law student
  • Unlimited hours per week

You do not have to register for this access. Your law school ID will remain active all summer for the above purposes and you will continue earning points as well! Summer access begins on the date your classes end through the date your classes begin in the fall. Normal law school terms of service apply outside of these dates.

New graduates, your school Lexis IDs will automatically turn into graduate Lexis IDs on July 01, 2016. Graduates can use Lexis Advance to study for the bar, prepare for job interviews, and at their new position. They will have unlimited access to Lexis Advance until Dec 31, 2016.

For questions and assistance, please contact our Lexis rep, Reeves Gillis.

WESTLAW
Current students may extend the access on their student Westlaw passwords for the summer if you are:

  • working for a law review or journal
  • working as a research assistant for a law professor
  • doing moot court work
  • taking summer law school classes, or completing papers or other academic projects for spring semester
  • doing an unpaid private non-profit (non-government) intern/externship or pro bono work required for graduation

Law school student passwords may not be used for government offices or agencies, law firms, corporations or other purposes unrelated to law school academic work.

To extend your password for summer access, visit this Westlaw password extension page.

New law school graduates may extend their Westlaw subscription through November 30, 2016 by completing a short survey. This extension will begin on June 1, 2016 and will last through November 30, 2016. It will allow graduates a total of 60 hours of access during that six month period (6 months or 60 hours).

For questions and assistance, please contact our Westlaw rep, Mark Frongillo.

OTHER DATABASES
And of course you also have full access over the summer to most other library resources at Harvard simply using your HUID and PIN. So if you need JSTOR, HeinOnline, Academic Search Premier or most other databases, you’re all set!

QUESTIONS?
If you have questions about summer access, or any research-related questions over the summer, you can always contact the library. Our full contact details are available at Ask a Librarian.

End of year guides to Bluebook and exams success

As another academic year winds to its end, we wanted to let you know about two new library guides that HLS students may find useful.

First, especially for LLM students who are finishing up their papers, but also useful for JD students doing scholarly writing, is our guide Bluebook Citation for LLM Students. This guide contains slides from the Library’s Bluebook classes, helpful charts, and frequently asked questions and answers, including dealing with non-English sources, American writing conventions, and what to do when the Bluebook doesn’t seem to have a rule for your type of source.

Second is our guide Prepare for HLS Exams intended for all students. This guide rounds up information and resources available in the Library and elsewhere at HLS that can help you successfully through one of the most stressful times in law school. It includes books at the library about taking law school exams, study guides and tools, guides to 1L topics, and ideas for short study breaks. We also include links out to general exam info at the Registrar’s office and the Dean of Student Office’s Wellness program.

We wish you success on finishing your papers, projects, and exams. As always, free earplugs are available at the reference and circulation desks!