Announcements •

Library Innovation Lab seeking Summer Fellows!

Do you know of an amazing person working in libraries, tech, or law? Ask them to join us in the HLS Library for the Library Innovation Lab 2017 Summer Fellows program!

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We’re looking for thinkers and doers from all backgrounds to explore future directions in libraries, law, and technology. Candidates may especially benefit from the Lab’s current work in open lawweb archivesprivate talking spacesfair usefree textbooks and more.

Fellows will have access to the Lab’s space in the Harvard Law School Library, use of Harvard’s research libraries, collaboration opportunities with members of the LIL and the Berkman Klein Center, as well as a $6,000 stipend.

The application deadline is fast approaching (February 10th) and we’re incredibly excited! See details and apply!

Jonathan Zittrain appointed to National Museum and Library Services Board

The staff of the Harvard Law School Library congratulates Jonathan Zittrain, Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources, on his appointment to the U.S. National Museum and Library Services Board. The Board advises the Institute of Museum and Library Services director on general policies and practices and comprises leaders and advocates in museums and library services. Vice Dean Zittrain was appointed to the Board by President Barack Obama as one of the last acts of his presidency, and was sworn in on January 17, 2017.

For more information about the Board, see  Seven Board Members Added to the National Museum and Library Services Board.

Book Talk: Heidi Gardner’s Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos, Mon. Jan. 30 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and discussion in celebration of Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos (Harvard Business Review Press, Jan 3. 2017) by Heidi K. Gardner, Lecturer on Law and Distinguished Fellow in the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School.  Copies of Smart Collaboration will be available for sale and Professor Gardner will be available for signing books at the end of her talk.

Heidi Gardner Book Talk Poster

Monday, January 30, 2016 at noon, with lunch
Harvard Law School Room WCC 2019 Milstein West A (Directions)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

More About Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos

“Not all collaboration is smart. Make sure you do it right. Professional service firms face a serious challenge. Their clients increasingly need them to solve complex problems–everything from regulatory compliance to cybersecurity, the kinds of problems that only teams of multidisciplinary experts can tackle. Yet most firms have carved up their highly specialized, professional experts into narrowly defined practice areas, and collaborating across these silos is often messy, risky, and expensive. Unless you know why you’re collaborating and how to do it effectively, it may not be smart at all. That’s especially true for partners who have built their reputations and client rosters independently, not by working with peers. In “Smart Collaboration,” Heidi K. Gardner shows that firms earn higher margins, inspire greater client loyalty, attract and retain the best talent, and gain a competitive edge when specialists collaborate across functional boundaries. Gardner, a former McKinsey consultant and Harvard Business School professor now lecturing at Harvard Law School, has spent over a decade conducting in-depth studies of numerous global professional service firms. Her research with clients and the empirical results of her studies demonstrate clearly and convincingly that collaboration pays, for both professionals and their firms. But Gardner also offers powerful prescriptions for how leaders can foster collaboration, move to higher-margin work, increase client satisfaction, improve lateral hiring, decrease enterprise risk, engage workers to contribute their utmost, break down silos, and boost their bottom line. With case studies and real-world insights, “Smart Collaboration” delivers an authoritative case for the value of collaboration to today’s professionals, their firms, and their clients and shows you exactly how to achieve it.” — Harvard Business Review Press

About Heidi K. Gardner

Heidi K. Gardner, PhD, is a Distinguished Fellow in the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School.  She also serves as a Lecturer on Law and the Faculty Chair of the school’s Accelerated Leadership Program executive course.  She was previously on the faculty at Harvard Business School.  Gardner has also been awarded an International Research Fellowship at Oxford University’s Said Business School.

Dr. Gardner’s research focuses on leadership and collaboration in professional service firms, and her book Smart Collaboration: How Professionals and Their Firms Succeed by Breaking Down Silos will be published by Harvard Business Press in January 2016.  Her research received the Academy of Management’s prize for Outstanding Practical Paper with Implications for Management. She has authored or co-authored more than fifty book chapters, case studies, and articles in scholarly and practitioner journals, including the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, and Harvard Business Review.  Her first book, Leadership for Lawyers: Essential Strategies for Law Firm Success was co-edited with Rebecca Normand-Hochman and published in 2015.

Dr. Gardner has lived and worked on four continents, including positions with McKinsey & Co. and Procter & Gamble, and as a Fulbright Scholar. She holds a BA in Japanese Studies from the University of Pennsylvania (summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa), a masters degree from the London School of Economics (with honors), and a second masters and doctorate in organizational behavior from London Business School.

852 RARE: Justice Frankfurter talks criminal justice, legal education, and the citizen lawyer in a recently-digitized video

 

Recorded audio and moving images have been part of our cultural history for over a century now, and over the years Harvard Law School’s Historical & Special Collections has amassed thousands of audiovisual artifacts related to legal history and curriculum in the United States and beyond. These types of media degrade relatively quickly, and can become obsolete when their players are no longer being produced. Even the DVD-R, a format developed barely 15 years ago – “new” if considered within the context of the long arc of preservable culture – is only expected to have a lifespan of 5 to 20 years before its contents are no longer readable. For comparison, HSC’s oldest item is a komonjo dated 1158 that (with proper housing, temperature, humidity control, security, and standard conservation intervention) is still thriving today, in a format that isn’t obsolete (rice paper).

In the interest of both mitigating these risks to ongoing preservation and providing access to more dynamic digital material for researchers, HSC is currently undergoing a long-term project to reformat our audiovisual collection. Many gems have been found already, but one in particular has stood out for this author: A Lawyer’s Place in Our Society, wherein Justice Felix Frankfurter (1882-1965) is interviewed by Prof. Paul A. Freund (1908-1992), recorded on 16mm film in the early 1960s and transferred later to u-matic tape, the copy from which the digital transfer was made. Paul Freund taught at Harvard Law School, focusing on constitutional law and conflict of laws, from 1939 until his retirement from teaching in 1976. Justice Frankfurter graduated from HLS in 1906, taught here from 1914-1939, and served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court from 1939-1962.

The two were close friends, and it’s evidenced by their comfortable and well-articulated conversation. Justice Frankfurter’s thoughts often circle back to some common themes. He believes very much that the lawyer should also be a civic leader, attributing this requirement to the changing nature of the law: as law and government historically expands into affecting everyday lives, the lawyer increasingly needs to be an active citizen. Both Freund and Frankfurter share the opinion that great lawyers shall be exceptionally well-read (because “even with the greatest breadth of personal experience, it’s infinitesimal compared with the accumulated experience of mankind, and the accumulated experience of mankind is predominantly contained in the covers of books,” [25:00]) and involved in many activities outside of the field of law.

In addition to unsurprising homages to Louis D. Brandeis (1856-1941) and Oliver Wendell Holmes (1841-1935), Frankfurter goes on at length about the influence that his early mentor, Henry L. Stimson, had on him. Through his work with the then-U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, he learned, “first and foremost, a sense of the deep responsibilities of all those who are concerned with the administration of the criminal law – the awfulness of the instruments by which men may lose their liberties and sometimes lose their lives as the result of a process of law” (28:00). Stimson would have preferred for search warrants to only be issued by a judicial officer, but absent that reality, he had his assistants accompany officers enforcing large search and seizure operations to ensure that they adhered strictly to the warrant and seized only the property that was explicitly described.

It’s quite extraordinary to see Frankfurter on film, born in the 19th century and speaking to us now. Though the interview was conducted near the end of his career and after the deaths of Holmes, Brandeis, and Stimson, it is stirring to imagine that his remarks are not speculation or even historic research based in their archives, but come from actual experiences with those towering legal figures that mentored him and significantly impacted American law. Check out the full video for yourself above, and stay tuned to Et Seq for more historic AV gems.

Library closed beginning Thursday at 5pm

Langdell Hall and Harkness Commons in winter

Langdell Hall and Harkness Commons, 1953. olvwork430844

If you need to check something out, bring home a book from your carrel, or otherwise access the HLS Library before winter break begins, please make sure to do so before tomorrow–Thursday, December 22–at 5pm. The Library, along with the rest of HLS, will be closed on December 23 reopening on Tuesday, January 3 at 8am.

HLS students, please note there is no 24-hour access during the break.

We hope everyone has happy holidays and a restful winter break, and we’ll see you next year!

New e-resources

The Harvard Library has an astounding number of resources, and we get more all the time! For help efficiently navigating it all, make an appointment to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

You can also view our list of recently activated e-journals.

Among our newest e-resources:

American Book Prices Current 

American Indians and the American West, 1809-1971

Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Bronzes at the Harvard Art Museums

 Australia’s Virtual Herbarium

Dave Leip U.S. House General County Election Results 

Conservation innovation in America : past, present, and future 

Digitalia Française           

Encyclopedia of mathematics    

Free Mapping Online

Harvard Art Museums Bauhaus Special Collection            

Harvard Art Museums Gordon Ward Gahan Collection  

Harvard Art Museums Lyonel Feininger: Photographs    

Harvard Art Museums The Social Museum Collection     

HistoryMakers 

IndustriusCFO 

Latin American History Collection eBooks             

Lexicon of Greek Grammarians of Antiquity

Lynda.com

Moscow Defense Brief Digital Archive   

National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS)

Orbis Bank Focus 

Routledge Performance Archive 

Sanborn Maps Geo Edition (1867-1970)

Wisers Information Portal      

Zhonghua min guo zheng fu guan zhi zi liao ku 中華民國政府官職資料庫

Now Available: Presidential Election Data

pe2016We’re pleased to share the news that Widener Library has acquired county-level presidential election data covering 1948-2016 as part of Harvard’s subscription to the Dataverse Project.

Need help getting started on working with data? Visit our Empirical Research Services page.

Calculate!

calculatorsJust in time for exams! By student request, we now have three TI-30XIIS calculators ready to help HLS students calculate during accounting or finance law exams! To check one out, visit the HLS Library Circulation Desk. The calculators will circulate for three hours.

Guide to researching executive power

If you have recently developed a stronger interest in the topic of executive power, we have a new research guide that can help you explore it through many resources available both at the HLS Library and beyond.

Executive Power: a guide to researching executive and presidential power in the United States covers:

  • tips for finding on point caselaw and other primary sources
  • treatises on constitutional law and the executive branch specifically plus dozens of books about executive and presidential power
  • databases–those covering law as well as political science, policy, and history
  • sources for very current as well as older scholarly articles
  • newspapers and legal blogs
  • how to find relevant Congressional Research Service reports and think tank publications
  • links to presidential libraries, resources about presidential transitions, and research guides to other aspects of the presidency

Book Talk: Norm Champ’s Going Public: My Adventures Inside the SEC and How to Prevent the Next Devastating Crisis, Wed. Nov. 30 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invite you to attend a book talk and discussion in celebration of Going Public: My Adventures Inside the SEC and How to Prevent the Next Devastating Crisis (McGraw-Hill Education, March 17, 2017) by Norm Champ, Lecturer in Law, former Director of the Division of Investment Management at the SEC, and currently a partner in the Private Funds Group at Kirkland & Ellis.  This book talk is co-sponsored by the Harvard Tax Law and Financial Regulation Students Association.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 at noon, with lunch



Harvard Law School Room WCC 2036 Milstein East B (Directions)

1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

blog-champMore About Going Public: My Adventures Inside the SEC and How to Prevent the Next Devastating Crisis

“In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the U.S. stock market went through seismic ruptures that destroyed businesses and damaged millions of lives. Daily revelations about an overly leveraged investment sector and endless scandal only underlined the vulnerability of the U.S. financial system. Facing its own ineptitude, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had to shape up, but how would that be possible in a dysfunctional agency riddled with bureaucratic bungling, soul-killing work rules, and civil service privileges that defied common sense?

In Going Public, Norm Champ details his time spent as the Director of the Division of Investment Management at the SEC. He offers a rare examination inside a major federal agency during a crisis, and his insights and accounts illuminate conditions in our economy today. His narrative is supported by:

  • Explanations on the inner workings of hedge funds, economic policy and politics, investing, and inefficient federal agencies;
  • Recommendations for policy changes to create healthy, corruption-free markets and help prepare Americans for future crises;
  • First-hand account of how players such as Ben Bernanke and Elizabeth Warren battled to shape Wall Street and financial reform; and
  • Exploration of a string of narrowly averted financial disasters that were hidden from the world including one that has never been made public.

Though there are signals that we are recreating prime conditions for another crisis, Champ shows how policymakers can avoid triggering these events, strengthen America’s financial system, and through commonsense regulation and increased financial literacy, make the U.S. the world’s most vibrant market.” — McGraw-Hill Education

About Norm Champ

Mr. Champ is a lecturer on investment management at Harvard Law School. He began teaching in the fall of 2015, having just completed a term as Visiting Scholar.  He joined Kirkland & Ellis LLP Investment Funds Group as a partner in February 2016. Mr. Champ is the former Director of the Division of Investment Management at the SEC. Under his leadership, the SEC adopted a new rule in July 2014 to reform money market mutual funds.

While at the SEC, Mr. Champ led the creation of the Division’s Risk and Examination Office which monitors the investment management industry to understand risks that regulations should address.  He was the leader of the SEC’s interactions with the Financial Stability Oversight Council as the Council turned its attention to designating asset management firms as “systemically important.” He also worked on crisis management efforts at securities firms to protect customers of those firms. Mr. Champ also headed the creation of Guidance Updates and Senior Level Engagement, initiatives created to provide transparency to the industry and to engage with boards and senior managements of asset management firms, respectively. Mr. Champ also recommended that the Commission adopt the portion of the Volcker Rule covering private funds and other matters. For his service in the Division at the SEC, Mr. Champ received the Chairman’s Award for Law and Policy in 2014, the Chairman’s Award for Labor Management Relations in 2014 and the Chairman’s Analytical Methods Award in 2013.

Prior to becoming the Director of the Division of Investment Management, he was the Deputy Director of the SEC’s Office of Compliance, Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) and the Associate Regional Director for Examinations in the SEC’s New York Regional Office. In that capacity he supervised examinations of broker-dealers, investment advisers/investment companies, exchanges, clearing agencies and credit rating agencies.  While at OCIE in 2011, Mr. Champ received the Chairman’s Award for Law and Policy and the Chairman’s Award for Labor-Management Relations.

Mr. Champ participated in the SEC’s Technical Assistance program in Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi and Hong Kong. He is a frequent and seasoned speaker having spoken on securities law topics at SEC programs, Princeton University’s Bendheim Center for Finance, the Practicing Law Institute, ICI, SIFMA, MFA, the Saudi Central Bank, the New York City Bar Association, the International Bar Association, the ACA Compliance Group and others.

Before joining the SEC in 2010, Mr. Champ was Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Chilton Investment Company, an investment adviser to long/short equity hedge funds and managed accounts. Prior to joining Chilton in 1999, Mr. Champ was at the law firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell.  From 1990 to 1992, Mr. Champ clerked for the Honorable Charles S. Haight, Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Mr. Champ has an A.B., summa cum laude, in History from Princeton University and a J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.  He was a Fulbright Scholar at King’s College London where he received his M.A. in War Studies.