Announcements •

Faculty Book Talk: Cass Sunstein’s Wiser: Going Beyond Groupthink to Make Better Decisions, Wed. Feb. 11 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor Cass Sunstein’s recently published book with Reid Hastie, Wiser: Going Beyond Groupthink to Make Better Decisions, Wednesday February 11, 2015, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Room WCC 2012. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Professor Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations.

Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014) and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014).

Sunstein book talk poster

“Why are group decisions so hard? Since the beginning of human history, people have made decisions in groups–first in families and villages, and now as part of companies, governments, school boards, religious organizations, or any one of countless other groups. And having more than one person to help decide is good because the group benefits from the collective knowledge of all of its members, and this results in better decisions. Right? Back to reality. We’ve all been involved in group decisions–and they’re hard. And they often turn out badly. Why? Many blame bad decisions on “groupthink” without a clear idea of what that term really means. Now, “Nudge” coauthor Cass Sunstein and leading decision-making scholar Reid Hastie shed light on the specifics of why and how group decisions go wrong–and offer tactics and lessons to help leaders avoid the pitfalls and reach better outcomes. In the first part of the book, they explain in clear and fascinating detail the distinct problems groups run into: They often amplify, rather than correct, individual errors in judgment; They fall victim to cascade effects, as members follow what others say or do; They become polarized, adopting more extreme positions than the ones they began with; They emphasize what everybody knows instead of focusing on critical information that only a few people know. In the second part of the book, the authors turn to straightforward methods and advice for making groups smarter. These approaches include silencing the leader so that the views of other group members can surface, rethinking rewards and incentives to encourage people to reveal their own knowledge, thoughtfully assigning roles that are aligned with people’s unique strengths, and more. With examples from a range of organizations–from Google to the CIA–and written in an engaging and witty style, “Wiser” will not only enlighten you; it will help your team and your organization make better decisions–decisions that lead to greater success.” —  Harvard Business Review Press

Book talk panelists include:

Martha Minow

 

 

 

Dean Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 12.49.54 PM

 

 

Professor Max H. BazermanJesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

 

Louis Kaplow

 

 

 

Professor Louis KaplowFinn M. W. Caspersen and Household International Professor of Law and Economics

 

——————————————————————————————————————————-

Lawrence Summers, Secretary of the Treasury under President Clinton; Director of the National Economic Council under President Obama—

“No man is an island, and all important decisions are made collectively. This important book shows how they can be made better and so will make groups, crowds, and our society wiser and better. Anyone involved in making decisions that matter should read this book.”

John Engler, President, Business Roundtable—

“Drawing on academic research, real-world examples, and, in Sunstein’s case, White House experience, the authors identify the most common mistakes groups fall victim to and offer sensible ways to avoid those often-expensive errors. In Sunstein and Hastie’s recommendations, CEOs and managers alike will find much that leaves them, in a word, wiser.”

Claire Shipman, Correspondent, ABC’s Good Morning America; Author, The Confidence Code

“More minds aren’t always better, according to Cass Sunstein and Reid Hastie. In Wiser, they deftly lay out the unexpected perils of group decision making and provide smart, straightforward, and often surprising fixes. Utterly fascinating and counterintuitive, this book is an essential read for executives and managers—for anybody, actually, hoping to make an enterprise successful.”

Austan Goolsbee, Professor, University of Chicago Booth School of Business; former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama—

“There have been lots of books written on why and how individuals make bad decisions. But many of the most important decisions are made by committee, where normal problems get magnified. Finally, Sunstein and Hastie have provided crucial insights and lessons to help groups and teams avoid pitfalls and make effective decisions. Leaders everywhere should take these lessons to heart.”

Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize–winning presidential historian; Author, Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit

“This gem of a book is full of penetrating insight, sensible advice, and fascinating stories drawn from practical experience. Written with clarity and grace, it provides an invaluable road map for leaders and managers in both public and private life. I can think of dozens of historical decisions that might have been better made had our leaders followed these precepts.”

Subscribe to Et Seq. by email

If you enjoy our posts at Et Seq., we have a new subscription option for you! We’ve updated our RSS feed settings so that in addition to subscribing with your favorite news reader, you may subscribe to updates by email.

To sign up, click the Subscribe to Et Seq. link in the red menu bar above. On days there are posts, you’ll receive a daily digest with all the day’s contents with the option to unsubscribe anytime.

New Library Exhibit: Where Mis’ry Moans

Where Misry Moans for webHistorical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that its new exhibit “‘Where Mis’ry Moans': Four Prison Reformers in 18th & 19th Century England” is now on view in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall.

At the dawn of the eighteenth century English prisons were often dark, filthy, and rife with disease and suffering. Oversight was lax and inspections were rare at best. This exhibit focuses on four prison reformers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries—John Howard, George Onesiphorus Paul, Elizabeth Fry, and John T. Burt—who worked to make prisons more humane and reformatory.

Curated by Margaret Peachy and Mary Person, it will be on view in the Caspersen Room 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM through April 24, 2015. A companion website to this exhibit can be found here.

 

Announcing the Lexis Digital Library!

Harvard faculty, students and staff may check out titles that the HLS Library owns in print on the Lexis Digital Library platform hosted by Overdrive. The collection includes primary and secondary sources, study aid sources, and newsletters. Most but not all of our Lexis print material is now available in this format.

The basic principle works exactly like print books: one book (or eBook), one loan. You may either read checked out items in your browser using Overdrive Read or download the book to another device such as your laptop, Amazon Kindle, Adobe Digital Editions, or other readers that use ePub format. After you check out a book, you may make annotations, create bookmarks, and highlight text. Annotations made in Overdrive Read will still be available if you check the book out again. We recommend using Overdrive Read instead of downloading to a device for that reason.

Browse our collection, check out books, or create lists of books you’d like to read at the HLS Library Lexis E-Book Library. More detailed instructions are also available and of course you can also ask a librarian for assistance.

HLS Library 2015 Research Competition & Prizes

HLS students, have you entered the 2015 HLS Library Legal Research Competition yet?

Show off your legal research skills and win great prizes! This year’s prizes include e-readers, gift cards and movie tickets.

Get the competition questions and rules at our research competition guide.

Work solo or in pairs!

January Madness – Julius Erving (aka “Dr. J.”) and Watergate

What do NBA Hall of Famer Julius Erving and Watergate have in common?  Absolutely nothing … except for legal Hall of Famer– Archibald Cox.

It would be reasonable for a person to ask how the lives of two men working in such different professions could overlap.  Professor Cox never performed a “Rock the Baby” style dunk and Mr. Erving never served as a special prosecutor in the Watergate investigation. Their lives intersected from approximately December 1972 until May 1973 when Cox served as an arbitrator in the Matter of Julius Erving and the Virginia Squires Basketball Club of the American Basketball Association.

ABA

Page 1 of 2 page letter from Robert Carlson to Archibald Cox. Archibald Cox Papers, Box 66, Folder 5.

 

Very briefly:  Erving turned pro after his junior year at the University of Massachusetts and signed a 4-year contract with the Virginia Squires starting on October 1, 1971.  In April, 1972 he signed a contract with the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association – hence the legal issue. (Erving claimed that the Squires contract was invalid.)  Erving lost the case and returned to the Squires who folded shortly thereafter due to financial problems. He went on to a Hall of Fame career most notably with the Philadelphia 76ers.

Cox was unable to complete his engagement as arbitrator for this case. In early May, 1973 he accepted appointment as the first Watergate special prosecutor.  In a letter to the attorneys for Erving v. the ABA, he apologized for removing himself explaining that, “It seemed to me that the same circumstances of national importance gave me no real choice but to undertake the assignment and made it proper to have to override the arbitral engagement.”

 

croppedwatergate

Portion of letter from Cox to attorneys announcing that he is stepping down as arbitrator. Cox Papers, Box 66, Folder 5

 

Historical & Special Collections holds the Archibald Cox papers, which has several boxes of material from his time as special prosecutor. The Library’s Watergate research material is enhanced by the James S. Doyle collection of Watergate material, and the papers of James Vorenberg, who was a senior assistant to Cox, (as well as a Harvard Law School colleague).

Plan ahead: HLS Library holiday hours

To help you plan ahead, please be aware of upcoming changes to the Library’s hours due to fall and winter holidays. During Thanksgiving and winter breaks, the library will be completely closed with no 24/7 access, so please make sure to request items from the Depository early and check out or take home from your carrels any print materials you may need during these times!

Thanksgiving

The Library will close at 5pm on Wednesday, November 26 (the reference desk will close at 3pm) and remain closed until Sunday, November 30 at 9am. No 24/7 access will be available.

Fall Reading Period and Exams, December 4-December 20

During the fall reading period and exams, access to the Harvard Law School Library is strictly limited to HLS affiliates. If you require access to specific resources in the our collection during this time, please check in with the Circulation Desk.

Winter Break

The Library will close at 12 noon on Wednesday, December 24 and remain closed until 9am on Saturday, January 3. The reference desk will re-open on Sunday, January 4. Once again, no 24/7 access will be available during this recess.

For a full calendar of our hours, please visit our website.

On behalf of the library, happy holidays, good luck on exams, and have a restful break!

Faculty Book Talk: Laurence H. Tribe’s Uncertain Justice: The Roberts Court and the Constitution, Friday November 21 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor Laurence  H. Tribe’s recently published book with Joshua Matz, Uncertain Justice:  The Roberts Court and the Constitution.

Friday November 21, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Professor Tribe is the Carl M. Loeb University Professor and Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard, has taught at its Law School since 1968 and was voted the best professor by the graduating class of 2000.  He has written over 115 books and articles, including his treatise, American Constitutional Law, cited more than any other legal text since 1950. Former Solicitor General Erwin Griswold wrote: “[N]o book, and no lawyer not on the [Supreme] Court, has ever had a greater influence on the development of American constitutional law,” and the Northwestern Law Review opined that no-one else “in American history has… simultaneously achieved Tribe’s preeminence… as a practitioner and… scholar of constitutional law.”

Tribe Uncertain Justice Poster

“With the Supreme Court more influential than ever, this eye-opening book tells the story of how the Roberts Court is shaking the foundation of our nation’s laws

From Citizens United to its momentous rulings regarding Obamacare and gay marriage, the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has profoundly affected American life. Yet the court remains a mysterious institution, and the motivations of the nine men and women who serve for life are often obscure. Now, in Uncertain Justice, Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz show the surprising extent to which the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution.

This essential book arrives at a make-or-break moment for the nation and the court. Political gridlock, cultural change, and technological progress mean that the court’s decisions on key topics—including free speech, privacy, voting rights, and presidential power—could be uniquely durable. Acutely aware of their opportunity, the justices are rewriting critical aspects of constitutional law and redrawing the ground rules of American government. Tribe—one of the country’s leading constitutional lawyers—and Matz dig deeply into the court’s recent rulings, stepping beyond tired debates over judicial “activism” to draw out hidden meanings and silent battles. The undercurrents they reveal suggest a strikingly different vision for the future of our country, one that is sure to be hotly debated.

Filled with original insights and compelling human stories, Uncertain Justice illuminates the most colorful story of all—how the Supreme Court and the Constitution frame the way we live.”  – Henry Holt and Co.

Book talk panelists include:

Martha Minow

 

 

 

Dean Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

Richard Lazarus

 

 

 

Professor Richard Lazarus, Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

“Tribe and Matz set out to portray the Roberts court in what they see as its messy complexity. It is no doubt difficult to write with clarity about uncertainty, but Tribe and Matz largely succeed. Surveying a shifting legal landscape, they offer crisp accounts of key cases.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Well-written and highly readable…. The strength of the book is its painstaking explanation of all sides of the critical cases, giving full voice and weight to conservative and liberal views alike…. The common-sense tone that prevails in most of the book is a tribute to the mastery of the Supreme Court by Tribe, a keen observer of the justices and of constitutional law for more than four decades.”—The Washington Post

“Full of bright and unconventional wisdom… Rejecting tiresome conventions of court reporting — liberals vs. conservatives, restraint vs. activism — the authors bring fresh insight to the court’s work.”—The Los Angeles Times

“An engaging and accessible history of the Court’s major decisions … [Tribe is] among this nation’s most sophisticated thinkers about constitutional law.”—New York Review of Books

“Marvelous…Tribe and Matz’s insights are illuminating…. [They] offer well-crafted overviews of key cases decided by the Roberts Court … [and] chart the Supreme Court’s conservative path, clarifying complex cases in accessible terms.”—The Chicago Tribune

“Tribe is a particularly effective messenger… [and] is among the nation’s most celebrated legal scholars…. By giving the Justices their due, this book reminds us what it really means to respect the Constitution and its mission.” —The Los Angeles Review of Books

“A well-researched, unsettling investigation of recent trends in the nation’s highest court… A near-forensic dissection of the court’s work under Roberts … Many of their conclusions will be eye-openers.”—Kirkus Reviews

“[An] insightful perspective on the Supreme Court… [and a] nuanced look at how the court under Chief Justice Roberts has arrived at momentous decisions from Citizens United to support for Obamacare.”—Booklist

“Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz have produced a brilliantly layered account of the Roberts Court. Filled with memorable stories and striking references to literature, baseball and popular culture, this book is a joy to read from start to finish—an irresistible narrative that will delight the general public as well as journalists and scholars.”—Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit

“Laurence Tribe, the foremost constitutional scholar and advocate of his generation, and Joshua Matz have written a brilliantly insightful and engaging account of the Roberts Court. Relentlessly fair-minded in its judgments about the justices and their work, Uncertain Justice is an indispensable guide to the Court’s recent history and, more importantly, to its future.”—Jeffrey Toobin, author of The Nine and Senior Legal Analyst, CNN

Uncertain Justice is a fascinating, penetrating, and highly readable analysis of the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence. Anyone who aspires to understand how and in what ways the Court is influencing our lives and our laws will want to read this superb and evenhanded book.”—Theodore B. Olson, U.S. Solicitor General for President George W. Bush

“No one knows the Supreme Court like Laurence Tribe, and no one brings its decisions to life like Tribe and Joshua Matz. Uncertain Justice is spellbinding—whether you care about gay marriage, health care, NSA surveillance, or gun control, this magnificent book will widen and deepen your understanding of our constitutional landscape.”—Kathleen M. Sullivan, Dean, Stanford Law School (1999-2004)

Uncertain Justice provides a uniquely valuable perspective on the often confusing swirl around the most divisive legal, social, and political issues of our time. Once I started reading it, I just could not stop.”—Ron Klain, Chief of Staff, Vice Presidents Biden (2009-11) and Gore (1995-99)

Uncertain Justice is must reading for anyone interested in the current unannounced agenda of the Supreme Court. Lucidly written and impeccably reasoned, this essential book documents the ways in which the Roberts Court has engaged in a wholesale revision of the Constitution.”—Scott Turow, author of One LPresumed Innocent, and Identical

“We need this book. It is a brilliant discussion of the murky, quirky, troubling, and uncertain Roberts Court. Written in simple, elegant prose for the general public, Uncertain Justice is the best explanation we have of how this Court reaches its most important decisions.”—John Jay Osborn Jr., author of The Paper Chase

Uncertain Justice offers a page-turning and accessible analysis of the Roberts Court and its individual justices. It illuminates the often sharp disagreements and occasionally surprising agreements that mark the Court’s performance. For those seeking a thoughtful, balanced, and fair-minded review of the Roberts Court, this is the book to read.”—Geoffrey Stone, Dean, University of Chicago Law School (1987-94)

“Put simply, Uncertain Justice is a great book. Timely and important, it tells it like it is and captures the essence of the Court’s changing role in American life. It is an amazing piece of work.”—Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

 

Designer in Residence at the Harvard Library Innovation Lab

The Harvard Library Innovation Lab and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society are looking for a web designer to help us build tools to explore the open Internet and define the future of libraries.

We are academics, activists, and entrepreneurs — often all three at once. As the Berkman Center mission statement explains, “Our method is to build out into cyberspace, record data as we go, self-study, and share. Our mode is entrepreneurial nonprofit.” Or as the Library Innovation Lab puts it: “We hack libraries to bring out all the great stuff they have to offer.”

We are seeking a designer who can work with our multi-disciplinary team to build beautiful and effective web tools. You should have vision and passion to contribute to our broad vision for the Internet, libraries, and society, as well as energy and deep technical expertise to deliver on our ambitious goals.

Projects range in scope from fast-moving prototypes to long-term innovations. Some are in full production, with minor tweaks needed, and some would benefit from your vision for wholesale rebranding and revision. Examples of projects to which you might contribute include Perma.cc, a web and link archiving service; H2O, a free platform for creating, sharing and adapting open course materials; and research projects focusing on reinforcing the overall health of the Internet such as Internet Monitor, Chilling Effects, and Amber.

The successful Designer in Residence will be an experienced collaborator with outstanding digital prototyping and front-end development skills and both a keen eye for detail and the ability to see a bigger perspective. He or she will have experience designing with accessibility, usability, and best practices in mind. This is a term limited position running through Spring and Summer semesters (January-August 2015).

Requirements:

BA; experienced web designer with 5+ years of professional experience (2-4 years in web development) and a strong portfolio of compelling UI/UX design.

• Familiar with back-end implementations and front-end presentations
• Responsive to feedback and at ease with rapid iteration based on that feedback
• Skilled with graphic editing tools
• Modern HTML5 CSS3 and JavaScript expertise
• Experienced with responsive web design
• Expert understanding of effective UI/UX patterns and best practices
• Excellent verbal and written communication skills
• Strong organizational skills and ability to prioritize work while working on multiple simultaneous projects.
• Excellent interpersonal and teamwork skills, positive attitude and sense of fun.
• Experience working with multiple stakeholders on a given project.

To apply go to: http://hr.harvard.edu/jobs

Faculty Book Talk: I. Glenn Cohen’s Patients With Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics, Wednesday, November 19 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor I. Glenn Cohen’s recently published book, Patients With Passports:  Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

I. Glenn Cohen is Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics. He is one of the world’s leading experts on the intersection of bioethics (or medical ethics), and the law, as well as health law. He also teaches civil procedure. Prior to becoming a professor, he served as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and as a lawyer for U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, Appellate Staff, where he handled litigation in the Courts of Appeals and in the U.S. Supreme Court. He was selected as a Radcliffe Institute Fellow (2012-2013) and by the Greenwall Foundation to receive a Faculty Scholar Award in Bioethics. He also leads the Ethics and Law initiative as part of the multi-million dollar NIH funded Harvard Catalyst for The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center program. Professor Cohen is the author of more than 60 articles and chapters, and his award-winning work has appeared in leading legal law review journals including: Stanford, Cornell, and Southern California; medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, and JAMA; bioethics journals including the American Journal of Bioethics, the Hastings Center Report; and for public health, the American Journal of Public Health. He is the editor of The Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Issues (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Now Available:  Front matter and first two chapters of Patients With Passports:  Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics, Free download via SSRN! or order directly from Oxford University Press with discount promotional code 33041.

Patients With Passports poster

 

“Can your employer require you to travel to India for a hip replacement as a condition of insurance coverage? If injury results, can you sue the doctor, hospital or insurer for medical malpractice in the country where you live? Can a country prohibit its citizens from helping a relative travel to Switzerland for assisted suicide? What about travel for abortion? In Patients with Passports, I. Glenn Cohen tackles these important questions, and provides the first comprehensive legal and ethical analysis of medical tourism.

Medical tourism is a growing multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care. Some seek legitimate services like hip replacements and travel to avoid queues, save money, or because their insurer has given them an incentive to do so. Others seek to circumvent prohibitions on accessing services at home and go abroad to receive abortions, assisted suicide, commercial surrogacy, or experimental stem cell treatments.

In this book, author I. Glenn Cohen focuses on patients traveling for cardiac bypass and other legal services to places like India, Thailand, and Mexico, and analyzes issues of quality of care, disease transmission, liability, private and public health insurance, and the effects of this trade on foreign health care systems. He goes on to examine medical tourism for services illegal in the patient’s home country, such as organ purchase, abortion, assisted suicide, fertility services, and experimental stem cell treatments. Here, Cohen examines issues such as extraterritorial criminalization, exploitation, immigration, and the protection of children. Through compelling narratives, expert data, and industry explanations Patients with Passports enables the reader to connect with the most prevalent legal and ethical issues facing medical tourism today.” — Oxford University Press

Book talk panelists include:

Amitabh Chandra

 

Professor Amitabh Chandra is an economist, a Professor of Public Policy and Director of Health Policy Research at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where he also Director of PhD Admissions and Area Chair for Social and Urban Policy. He is a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) Panel of Health Advisors, and is a Research Associate at the IZA Institute in Bonn, Germany and at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

Nir Eyal

 

 

Professor Nir Eyal is Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine (Medical Ethics) at the Harvard Medical School. His primary appointment is at Harvard University’s campus-wide Program in Ethics and Health.

 

Alicia Ely Yamin

 

 

Professor Alicia Ely Yamin is a Lecturer on Global Health and Policy Director at the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University.