Et. Seq: The Harvard Law School Library Blog

Scaling Up Perma.cc: Ensuring the Integrity of the Digital Scholarly Record

Earlier this year, the HLS Library Innovation Lab received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to scale up our Perma.cc tool, which helps scholars, journals, courts, and others create permanent records of the web sources they cite.

If you’re curious to learn more about our plans for further developing Perma.cc, you can read more about it in Scaling Up Perma.cc: Ensuring the Integrity of the Digital Scholarly Record in this month’s D-Lib Magazine, which is devoted to descriptions of projects funded by the IMLS.

Archiving Student Life: HLS Community Capture Project

This past semester, Historical & Special Collections (HSC) continued its efforts to collect material documenting student life at HLS. These efforts began in Spring 2016 and our commitment to the project has increased since then, thanks in large part to a Harvard Library S.T. Lee Innovation Grant. Student organizations are a vital part of the HLS community and we hope to capture and preserve as much as we can to help document the impact students have on HLS and support your work!

HSC currently holds only a few student organizations’ records, along with a variety of student organization newsletters and event flyers. In order to capture today’s campus activities, we need to think more broadly about collecting student-created material. Today, that broad mindset involves grappling with the vulnerability of digital material. Building relationships with both individuals and the organizations (that means you!) that create digital content is urgent if we hope to help preserve this material for the future.

Harvard Law School Women's History Month calendar, March 1994, HLS Ephemera Collection, box 4, folder 6

Women’s Law Association (WLA) Women’s History Month calendar, March 1994, HLS Ephemera Collection, Box 4, Folder 6

With funding made possible by the S.T. Lee Innovation Grants, Historical & Special Collections is investigating better methods for collecting born digital material from student organizations through the HLS Community Capture Project. A part-time project assistant started working with us in March of this year, which has enabled us to offer flexible meeting times with student organization leaders outside of the traditional 9 to 5. So far, we have talked to close to 30 student leaders about preserving student organization material and have created a LibGuide that brings together much of our existing student-created content. [Read More]

Graduates, send your family and friends on a library tour!

You spent hundreds of hours studying here. Now send your family and friends to see the place!

The HLS Library is offering library tours for family and friends of our newest HLS graduates on Class Day, Wednesday, May 24. Tours last about 20 minutes and will cover

  • Library art and treasures
  • HLS history
  • Library buildings and quotes
  • Our world-famous beanbag alley

Registration is requested but not required so we can have enough tour guides available. Meet at the Circulation Desk just inside the main entrance.

Register guests for 12:00pm

Register guests for 12:30pm

Register guests for 1:00pm

Self-guided mobile tours are also available.

Happy birthday to us: Et Seq. is 10!

Et Seq., the Harvard Law School Library Blog, officially marks its 10th anniversary today!

Et Seq. in 2007

Et Seq. in 2007

Although the first blog post, Working on a paper? Need research help? was dated February 1, 2007, library staff at the time had been blogging privately to “exercise the blog and try to get a feel for how it might actually work ‘in the real world.'” (Note: If you ARE working on a paper and need research help in 2017, the method to do that is different now: simply fill out the form on our Ask a Librarian page.)

After the test period was deemed successful, Et Seq. was officially “released into cyberspace” on May 4, 2007. A Harvard Law School Library internal staff newsletter at the time proclaimed the moment “unquestionably a significant technological milestone.”

While historians have yet to agree with that assertion, we’re still proud of our blog. Over the years, we’ve brought you legal, library, and local news; updates and reviews of our library resources and services; 852 RARE, the series highlighting our Historical & Special Collections materials; a special series on our Ruhleben Camp collection; and posts about law and pop culture or holidays–and many other topics! We’ve switched blogging platforms once, and we also added social media to our arsenal of communications tools. (If you haven’t checked them out lately, have a look at our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts.) At least 48 members of our staff, past and present, have posted to Et Seq.

In addition to our ten year milestone, we’re also hitting a post milestone today: this post is the lucky 1300th! We look forward to many more years of informing you about HLS Library news, events, resources, and services.

Happy birthday, Et Seq.!

New e-resources

The Harvard Library has an astounding number of resources, and we get more all the time! For help efficiently navigating it all, make an appointment to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

You can also view our list of recently activated e-journals.

Among our newest e-resources are:

Note: where available, the “about” descriptions are taken from the resources themselves.

Biography Literature 傳記文學全文資料庫 (1962-2016)               

Ethnographic Video Online, Volume IV: Festivals and Archives
Ethnographic Video Online is a comprehensive online resource for the study of human culture, behavior and society around the world. The collections contain over 1,300 hours of streaming video, including ethnographic films, documentaries, select feature films, and previously unpublished fieldwork. It’s also a resource for a study of the discipline itself: By placing examples of traditional ethnographic methodologies alongside indigenous-made films representing previously overlooked perspectives, scholars, teachers and students of anthropology can gain a sense of the discipline’s history and of its future direction.

Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive  
HBW Alive is an online comprehensive resource for all the birds of the world. It contains the contents of the acclaimed 17-volume Handbook of the Birds of the World (HBW) series.          

Historical Book Catalog of China System 中国历代典籍总目分析系统   

Making of Modern Law: ACLU Papers, 1912-1990 
For more about the ACLU Papers, see our April blog post about the collection.

Music Magazine Archive
Music Magazine Archive is a series of digital collections focused on 20th and 21st century genres such as Rock, Folk, and Hip-Hop & Rap. Each genre-based collection unites every page and every issue of a diverse and influential group of magazines. These publications uniquely capture the social and historical context of each genre, and together support scholarly research areas such as race, class, gender, American studies, youth culture, and more across some of the most progressive decades of the 20th and 21st centuries. Researchers will find all material represented in the original publications, preserved in its original context, fully searchable and in high-resolution full color. This collection contains 1,461 issues comprising 100,712 pages and 91,454 articles.             

NUSA
The Series focuses primarily on works about languages in Indonesia, but studies of languages from nearby countries are also welcome. Papers appearing in NUSA may be original or translated from languages other than English. NUSA is a peer-reviewed journal and all papers will be fully refereed by at least two anonymous reviewers. 

Pakistan Microfinance Network 
The Pakistan Microfinance Network (PMN or ‘the Network’) traces its beginnings to 1997 when a group of microfinance practitioners laid its foundations as an informal platform for coordination, exchange of ideas and peer learning. Since then the Network has grown significantly and is now recognized locally and globally as the national association for retail players in Pakistan’s microfinance industry. Registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission [SECP] in April 2001 under Section 42 of the Companies Ordinance, PMN is a member driven network with a vision to expand access to formal financial services in Pakistan.

ProQuest Executive Orders and Presidential Proclamations 1789-present
Executive Orders are the formal means through which the President of the United States executes a wide range of actions related to the Federal Government’s internal operations and organization, as well as foreign and domestic policies. Presidential proclamations and executive orders have the force of law, and have played a role in many historic events, including Indian removal, internment of Japanese‐Americans during World War II, and desegregation of the military. The Emancipation Proclamation was the first numbered executive order.

Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions and Other Advisory Bodies

HeinOnline has a new product that will interest anyone–law students and faculty, historians, political scientists–researching presidential commissions or the catastrophes, crises, and issues they have investigated.

Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions and Other Advisory Bodies comprises an extensive listing of presidential advisory bodies from Andrew Jackson to Barack Obama. Content includes more than 6000 database entries, 1200 links to full text documents, and cover hundreds of subjects including AIDS, bioethics, chemical warfare, immigration, nuclear weapons, and many more. Documents in the collection include congressional hearings, books, scholarly articles, and links to external content.

The database will be updated at least twice a year to add new commissions as well as newly discovered documents from past administrations.

Highlights of commissions included in the collection include:

  • President’s Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy (Warren Commission)
  • President’s Commission on Campus Unrest
  • Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS
  • Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident
  • Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction (Iraq Intelligence Commission)
  • National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (9/11 Commission)
  • National Commission on the BP Deepwater

You can search the collection by keywords, president, commission subject, commission/author, and report title, as well as browse by president, commission name, commission subject, and report title.

For more information about using Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions and Other Advisory Bodies, please check out the HeinOnline blog post or Ask a Librarian–we’ll be happy to help you get started on your research.

Restricted Access at Harvard Law School Library: April 26 – May 12, 2017

Blog post by Brian Sutton, Access Services Manager 

To ensure adequate study space for Law School students during the spring exam period, the Harvard Law School Library will have restricted access from Wednesday April 26 through Friday, May 12. During this time, only HLS affiliates will be able to use the Law Library for study hall purposes. Non-HLS IDs will not work at the turnstile entrance.

Harvard University affiliates who need to borrow regular loan materials from the collection, or use a part of the collection, please check in at the Circulation Desk. Circulating books can be ordered through Harvard Direct service, also known as clicking request item on HOLLIS.

If you have questions about access, please contact staff at the Circulation Desk: 617-495-3455 or access@law.harvard.edu.

MCLE updates

We recently had an update session from MCLE New England aka Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education. MCLE’s mission is “to provide post-legal education for lawyers to keep lawyers up to date on the rapid practice changes.” The library’s MCLE OnePass subscription gives you access to a wide variety of electronic resources, including webcasts, e-books, professional development plans, and forms for Massachusetts, as well as offerings for Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Maine.

How do I get access to MCLE?
Visit MCLE while on campus and click the Sign In or Register option to create your individual account. Once set up, you’ll be able to access MCLE from anywhere. You can also set your practice area interests, mailing preferences, and search preferences.

How do I use MCLE?

  • Search for material by practice area, content type, types of eforms, and more. Narrow your search with a number of facets, including practice area and webcasts.
  • Browse by practice area or Products + Services type. Hint: when searching by Products + Services type, select the MCLE OnePass option to access material covered under our subscription.

What’s new in MCLE?
A new content type called 1st Look provides live and on-demand webcasts for new developing topics such as:

  • “1st Look” at the Impact of Recent Executive Orders on Your Immigration Client Matters
  • “1st Look” at the New Massachusetts Marijuana Law

Type “1st Look” in the search bar to view other titles in the series.

BBO disciplinary decisions are now available. To provide context and consequences, MCLE is also pulling together books, articles, and webinars that are related to a particular disciplinary action.

Demonstration videos that are embedded within e-lecture videos are tagged so they are easier to find. Examples of demonstration videos include client interviews and voir dire simulations.

The number of checklists for all practice areas has increased.

Information about what’s new for each e-book is now listed prominently on the splash page of each title.

They have print and e-book archives going back to 2000 available in PDF for researchers, upon request for free.

What if I want more assistance?

Please ask a librarian and we’ll be happy to help you get set up or find material. It’s what we’re here for!

New resource: ACLU papers

The HLS Library now has access to the American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1990, part of Gale’s Making of Modern Law Collection.

Material included in the collection includes bills, briefs, correspondence, court documents, legal case files, memorandums, minutes, newspaper clippings, reports, scrapbooks, and telegrams.

The folks at Gale have put together a short video tutorial (below) demonstrating features of the collection, which include:

  • explore collections contained in the Papers
  • narrowing results by topic, collection, document type, and more
  • search within a document
  • advanced search options with fields and ability to limit by date, collection, document type, and documents with illustrations
  • view material in PDF or text format
  • ability to download individual pages to whole documents
  • export citation details to citation tools including EndNote, RefWorks, and others
  • bookmark URLs that can be used as permalinks in syllabi
  • explore term clusters to visualize use and frequency of keywords and subjects across the collection

If you’d like personal assistance, ask a librarian and we’ll be happy to meet with you.

Here’s a short summary of the collection from Gale:

“For most of the twentieth century the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was the principal defender of the rights that citizens can assert against government. Its primary aims have been the defense of the freedoms of speech and press, the separation of church and state, the free exercise of religion, due process of law, equal protection of the law, and the privacy rights of all citizens. The organization has been responsible for what historian Samuel Walker has called “a revolution of law and public attitudes toward individual liberty.” Walker estimates that modern constitutional law has been shaped in no small measure by the ACLU, with the organization involved in some eighty percent of the landmark cases of the twentieth century. The ACLU fostered the growth of tolerance, fought to end racial discrimination, promoted a legal definition of privacy rights, and defended the rights of the unpopular, the powerless, and the despised.

“The files cover numerous topics that resonate for contemporary research. Subjects include: the first “Red Scare” following the Russian Revolution of 1917; debates in the 1920s on immigration; the American Birth Control League; lynchings in the 1930s; debates on aliens and immigrants in the years immediately preceding the U.S. entry into the Second World War; and the ACLU’s involvement in two of the mid-century’s most important issues: the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights movement. In the Second Reconstruction, 1945-1968, the ACLU played a vital role in the gradual but progressive movement to provide full political rights for African Americans and to begin to redress longstanding economic and social inequities.”

New platform for movies: Film Platform

Film Platform LogoWe’re happy to share the news that Harvard has access to an additional streaming platform for films, the aptly named Film Platform. Film Platform joins our existing film options which include our DVD collection, KanopyMet Opera on Demand, and other streaming services.

Film Platform contains a curated collection of educational films covering a variety of topics likely to be of interest to the HLS community: from legal studies generally to human rights, environmental studies, politics, and technology, among others.

What can you do with Film Platform?

  • View films on your own
  • Show them to a class
  • Screen them for student organization events (these must be free of charge)

Film Platform also offers an option to host Skype Q+A sessions with film makers. This requires an additional fee, which varies, but we’d be happy to explore the option with you.

If you have questions about Film Platform or films available at the library generally, ask a librarian and we’ll be happy to help.

Here are some examples of titles on Film Platform that may be of interest:

Chasing Ice
In the spring of 2005, acclaimed environmental photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment for National Geographic: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earth’s changing climate. Even with a scientific upbringing, Balog had been a skeptic about climate change. But that first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk. Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet.

3 1/2 Minutes, Ten Bullets
On Black Friday 2012, four African-American teenagers stopped at a gas station to buy gum and cigarettes. One of them, Jordan Davis, argued with Michael Dunn, a white man parked beside them, over the volume of music playing in their car. The altercation turned to tragedy when Dunn fired 10 bullets at the unarmed boys, killing Davis almost instantly. The seamlessly constructed, riveting documentary film 3 1⁄2 Minutes, Ten Bullets explores the danger and subjectivity of Florida’s Stand Your Ground self-defense laws by weaving Dunn’s trial with a chorus of citizen and pundit opinions, alongside the wrenching experiences of Jordan Davis’ parents.

Newtown
Filmed over the course of nearly three years, the filmmakers use unique access and never before heard testimonies to tell a story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history. Newtown documents a traumatized community fractured by grief and driven toward a sense of purpose. Joining the ranks of a growing club to which no one wants to belong, a cast of characters interconnect to weave an intimate story of community resilience.

E-TEAM
Anna, Ole, Fred and Peter are four members of the Emergencies Team — or E-Team — the most intrepid division of a respected, international human rights group. Trained to deal with unfolding crises, the E-Team flies to hotspots all over the world as soon as allegations of human rights abuse surface.

Virunga
In the forested depths of eastern Congo lies Virunga National Park, one of the most biodiverse places on earth and home to the planet’s last remaining mountain gorillas. In this wild but enchanted environment, a small and embattled team of park rangers – including an ex-child soldier turned ranger, a caretaker of orphan gorillas and a dedicated conservationist – protect this UNESCO World Heritage site from armed militia, poachers and the dark forces struggling to control Congo’s rich natural resources.

Fukushima – A Nuclear Story
What was it that saved Tokyo from a nuclear disaster? Narrated by Willem Dafoe, this is the story of the foreign journalists who were are allowed to enter the Fukushima-Daiichi power plant after waiting two years to uncover the truth about the 2011 accident hidden behind those walls. The ex-premier Naoto Kan reveals the events as they really happened. Using digital reconstruction to elucidate the scientific complexities of the accident, the film uncovers the layers of accountability at play.

The C Word
With a dose of good humor, heart, and a touch of rock—n—roll beat, THE C WORD reveals the forces at play keeping us sick and dares to ask: if up to 70% of cancer deaths are preventable…what are we waiting for? At the heart of The C Word are powerful, twin narratives: one from celebrated French neuroscientist and cancer revolutionary Dr. David Servan-Schreiber, the other fromThe C Word‘s own director, Meghan L. O’Hara. After braving the journey from diagnosis to wellness, Meghan and David join forces on a wild ride of discovery; including hidden science, the absurdity of the status quo, and a vibrant cast of characters changing the game.

A Brave Heart
From the producers of the most viewed TEDWomen event of 2013 comes “A Brave Heart: The Lizzie Velasquez Story,” a documentary following the inspiring journey of 26 year old, 58 pound Lizzie from cyber-bullying victim to anti-bullying activist. The film chronicles unheard stories and details of Lizzie’s physical and emotional journey up to her multi-million viewed TEDx talk, and follows her pursuit from a motivational speaker to Capitol Hill as she lobbies for the first federal anti-bullying bill.

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