Time to update your Westlaw passwords

Westlaw is requiring users to set new passwords during the week of February 1. This includes all HLS faculty, staff, and students (unless you registered for Westlaw after October 7.) If you change your password now, you won’t be required to change it next week.

To change your password now, simply log in and click update next to your name in the upper left of the page, then click on manage ONE PASS Profile and re-enter a new password, re-enter it again, and click save.

For more detailed steps, visit Westlaw’s instructions for changing or resetting your OnePass password (including a video). You may also call Westlaw at 1-800-WESTLAW for assistance.

New on HeinOnline: author profiles

Authors of law journal articles may be interested in a new feature at HeinOnline: Author Profile Pages, which show a list of works affiliated with a given author, as well as citation and access statistics, similar to those at SSRN. In addition, you can customize your Author Profile Page by adding your photo, affiliation, bio, and social media links.

HeinOnline used our own Dean Roscoe Pound as an example to illustrate how they look!

HeinOnline Author Profile of Roscoe Pound

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The form to customize your profile is easy to fill out–start by searching for your name as author in Hein’s Law Journal Library, click on it in the results, then click the submit author profile link. Step-by-step instructions are available at HeinOnline’s blog. Mine took just a few minutes to complete, and Hein sent me confirmation of the update within a couple hours.

Thanks to WisBlawg for the tip!

Faculty Book Talk: Cass Sunstein’s Wiser: Going Beyond Groupthink to Make Better Decisions, Wed. Feb. 11 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor Cass Sunstein’s recently published book with Reid Hastie, Wiser: Going Beyond Groupthink to Make Better Decisions, Wednesday February 11, 2015, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Room WCC 2012. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Professor Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations.

Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014) and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014).

Sunstein book talk poster

“Why are group decisions so hard? Since the beginning of human history, people have made decisions in groups–first in families and villages, and now as part of companies, governments, school boards, religious organizations, or any one of countless other groups. And having more than one person to help decide is good because the group benefits from the collective knowledge of all of its members, and this results in better decisions. Right? Back to reality. We’ve all been involved in group decisions–and they’re hard. And they often turn out badly. Why? Many blame bad decisions on “groupthink” without a clear idea of what that term really means. Now, “Nudge” coauthor Cass Sunstein and leading decision-making scholar Reid Hastie shed light on the specifics of why and how group decisions go wrong–and offer tactics and lessons to help leaders avoid the pitfalls and reach better outcomes. In the first part of the book, they explain in clear and fascinating detail the distinct problems groups run into: They often amplify, rather than correct, individual errors in judgment; They fall victim to cascade effects, as members follow what others say or do; They become polarized, adopting more extreme positions than the ones they began with; They emphasize what everybody knows instead of focusing on critical information that only a few people know. In the second part of the book, the authors turn to straightforward methods and advice for making groups smarter. These approaches include silencing the leader so that the views of other group members can surface, rethinking rewards and incentives to encourage people to reveal their own knowledge, thoughtfully assigning roles that are aligned with people’s unique strengths, and more. With examples from a range of organizations–from Google to the CIA–and written in an engaging and witty style, “Wiser” will not only enlighten you; it will help your team and your organization make better decisions–decisions that lead to greater success.” —  Harvard Business Review Press

Book talk panelists include:

Martha Minow

 

 

 

Dean Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 12.49.54 PM

 

 

Professor Max H. BazermanJesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School

 

Louis Kaplow

 

 

 

Professor Louis KaplowFinn M. W. Caspersen and Household International Professor of Law and Economics

 

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Lawrence Summers, Secretary of the Treasury under President Clinton; Director of the National Economic Council under President Obama—

“No man is an island, and all important decisions are made collectively. This important book shows how they can be made better and so will make groups, crowds, and our society wiser and better. Anyone involved in making decisions that matter should read this book.”

John Engler, President, Business Roundtable—

“Drawing on academic research, real-world examples, and, in Sunstein’s case, White House experience, the authors identify the most common mistakes groups fall victim to and offer sensible ways to avoid those often-expensive errors. In Sunstein and Hastie’s recommendations, CEOs and managers alike will find much that leaves them, in a word, wiser.”

Claire Shipman, Correspondent, ABC’s Good Morning America; Author, The Confidence Code

“More minds aren’t always better, according to Cass Sunstein and Reid Hastie. In Wiser, they deftly lay out the unexpected perils of group decision making and provide smart, straightforward, and often surprising fixes. Utterly fascinating and counterintuitive, this book is an essential read for executives and managers—for anybody, actually, hoping to make an enterprise successful.”

Austan Goolsbee, Professor, University of Chicago Booth School of Business; former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama—

“There have been lots of books written on why and how individuals make bad decisions. But many of the most important decisions are made by committee, where normal problems get magnified. Finally, Sunstein and Hastie have provided crucial insights and lessons to help groups and teams avoid pitfalls and make effective decisions. Leaders everywhere should take these lessons to heart.”

Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize–winning presidential historian; Author, Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit

“This gem of a book is full of penetrating insight, sensible advice, and fascinating stories drawn from practical experience. Written with clarity and grace, it provides an invaluable road map for leaders and managers in both public and private life. I can think of dozens of historical decisions that might have been better made had our leaders followed these precepts.”

Subscribe to Et Seq. by email

If you enjoy our posts at Et Seq., we have a new subscription option for you! We’ve updated our RSS feed settings so that in addition to subscribing with your favorite news reader, you may subscribe to updates by email.

To sign up, click the Subscribe to Et Seq. link in the red menu bar above. On days there are posts, you’ll receive a daily digest with all the day’s contents with the option to unsubscribe anytime.

Free resource: Historical Thesaurus of English

For fans of old words and synonyms, the Historical Thesaurus of English from the University of Glasgow may be of interest:

The HT is the only online resource to make every English word from the last 1,000 years and its meaning available to the public and fully searchable.

The HT contains a record of nearly 800,000 words used at any point over the last millennium. It also contains links to their synonyms and records when the word came into and disappeared from use.

Infodocket also notes that HT entries include direct links to the Oxford English Dictionary online, which Harvard subscribes to.

New Library Exhibit: Where Mis’ry Moans

Where Misry Moans for webHistorical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that its new exhibit “‘Where Mis’ry Moans': Four Prison Reformers in 18th & 19th Century England” is now on view in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall.

At the dawn of the eighteenth century English prisons were often dark, filthy, and rife with disease and suffering. Oversight was lax and inspections were rare at best. This exhibit focuses on four prison reformers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries—John Howard, George Onesiphorus Paul, Elizabeth Fry, and John T. Burt—who worked to make prisons more humane and reformatory.

Curated by Margaret Peachy and Mary Person, it will be on view in the Caspersen Room 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM through April 24, 2015. A companion website to this exhibit can be found here.

 

Announcing the Lexis Digital Library!

Harvard faculty, students and staff may check out titles that the HLS Library owns in print on the Lexis Digital Library platform hosted by Overdrive. The collection includes primary and secondary sources, study aid sources, and newsletters. Most but not all of our Lexis print material is now available in this format.

The basic principle works exactly like print books: one book (or eBook), one loan. You may either read checked out items in your browser using Overdrive Read or download the book to another device such as your laptop, Amazon Kindle, Adobe Digital Editions, or other readers that use ePub format. After you check out a book, you may make annotations, create bookmarks, and highlight text. Annotations made in Overdrive Read will still be available if you check the book out again. We recommend using Overdrive Read instead of downloading to a device for that reason.

Browse our collection, check out books, or create lists of books you’d like to read at the HLS Library Lexis E-Book Library. More detailed instructions are also available and of course you can also ask a librarian for assistance.

HLS Library 2015 Research Competition & Prizes

HLS students, have you entered the 2015 HLS Library Legal Research Competition yet?

Show off your legal research skills and win great prizes! This year’s prizes include e-readers, gift cards and movie tickets.

Get the competition questions and rules at our research competition guide.

Work solo or in pairs!

January Madness – Julius Erving (aka “Dr. J.”) and Watergate

What do NBA Hall of Famer Julius Erving and Watergate have in common?  Absolutely nothing … except for legal Hall of Famer– Archibald Cox.

It would be reasonable for a person to ask how the lives of two men working in such different professions could overlap.  Professor Cox never performed a “Rock the Baby” style dunk and Mr. Erving never served as a special prosecutor in the Watergate investigation. Their lives intersected from approximately December 1972 until May 1973 when Cox served as an arbitrator in the Matter of Julius Erving and the Virginia Squires Basketball Club of the American Basketball Association.

ABA

Page 1 of 2 page letter from Robert Carlson to Archibald Cox. Archibald Cox Papers, Box 66, Folder 5.

 

Very briefly:  Erving turned pro after his junior year at the University of Massachusetts and signed a 4-year contract with the Virginia Squires starting on October 1, 1971.  In April, 1972 he signed a contract with the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association – hence the legal issue. (Erving claimed that the Squires contract was invalid.)  Erving lost the case and returned to the Squires who folded shortly thereafter due to financial problems. He went on to a Hall of Fame career most notably with the Philadelphia 76ers.

Cox was unable to complete his engagement as arbitrator for this case. In early May, 1973 he accepted appointment as the first Watergate special prosecutor.  In a letter to the attorneys for Erving v. the ABA, he apologized for removing himself explaining that, “It seemed to me that the same circumstances of national importance gave me no real choice but to undertake the assignment and made it proper to have to override the arbitral engagement.”

 

croppedwatergate

Portion of letter from Cox to attorneys announcing that he is stepping down as arbitrator. Cox Papers, Box 66, Folder 5

 

Historical & Special Collections holds the Archibald Cox papers, which has several boxes of material from his time as special prosecutor. The Library’s Watergate research material is enhanced by the James S. Doyle collection of Watergate material, and the papers of James Vorenberg, who was a senior assistant to Cox, (as well as a Harvard Law School colleague).

Bloomberg BNA Writing Competition and Clerkship Event

Bloomberg Law is hosting two events that may be of interest to HLS students:

First, a writing competition for original articles analyzing legal trends and developments. Enter for the chance to win $5000 and publication of your article in one of five Bloomberg BNA law reports: Corporate Law & Accounting Report; Employment Discrimination Report; Health Law Reporter; Patent, Trademark & Copyright Journal; and U.S. Law Week. Register to compete for all details including rules, tips, and sample topics; submission deadline is March 11.

Second, if you have accepted a post-graduation judicial clerkship, Bloomberg invites you to a clerkship networking event in New York City on March 5. Judge Jed Rakoff of the Southern District of New York will give the keynote. The event is free; simply RSVP.