BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google with author John Palfrey

John Palfrey image

BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google

with author John Palfrey

Monday, June 22, 2015 at 6:00 pm
Harvard Law School
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East
RSVP required for those attending in person 
Reception immediately following Book Talk

Co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

BiblioTech by John Palfrey

John Palfrey will discuss his new book, BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever In An Age of Google.  He argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online.  Libraries play a crucial role in making these skills and information available — and yet are at risk. In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible—by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online, while continuing to play the vital role as public spaces in our democracy that they have for hundreds of years.

About John

John is the Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover.  He serves as Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Knight Foundation and President of the Board of Directors of the Digital Public Library of America.  He also serves as a director of the Data + Society Research Institute.

John’s research and teaching focus on new media and learning.  He has written extensively on Internet law, intellectual property, and the potential of new technologies to strengthen democracies locally and around the world.  He is the author or co-author of several books, including BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google (Basic Books, 2015); Interop: The Promise and Perils of Highly Interconnected Systems (Basic Books, 2012) (with Urs Gasser); Intellectual Property Strategy (MIT Press, 2012); Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives (Basic Books, 2008) (with Urs Gasser); and Access Denied: The Practice and Politics of Global Internet Filtering (MIT Press, 2008).

John served previously as the Henry N. Ess III Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School.  He is a director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, where he was executive director from 2002-2008. John came back to the Harvard Law School from the law firm Ropes & Gray, where he worked on intellectual property, Internet law, and private equity transactions. He also served as a Special Assistant at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton administration.  He previously served as a venture executive at Highland Capital Partners and on the Board of Directors of the Mass2020 Foundation, the Ames Foundation, and Open Knowledge Commons, among others.  John was a Visiting Professor of Information Law and Policy at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland for the 2007-2008 academic year.

John graduated from Harvard College, the University of Cambridge, and Harvard Law School.  He was a Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholar to the University of Cambridge and the U.S. EPA Gold Medal (highest national award).

 

New Library Exhibit: It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester … Portrayals of Harvard Law School in Literature

Historical & Special Collections is pleased to announce that its new exhibit, “It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester … Portrayals of Harvard Law School in Literature” is now on display in the Caspersen Room on the fourth floor of Langdell Hall.

It Was a Dark and Stormy Semester ...

 

This exhibit seeks to highlight the role of Harvard Law School in fiction, whether the law school serves as the scene, the featured characters are law school graduates, or even when the law school has inspired its students to become novelists during their JD studies.

Curated by Claire DeMarco and Ed Moloy, it will be on view in the Caspersen Room 9:00 am to 5:00 pm through  August 14, 2015.

All about the HLS Faculty Portrait Collection

Simon Greenleaf portrait

Simon Greenleaf portrait by George Peter Alexander Healy, 1848, olvwork724100.

If you’ve enjoyed the collection of Harvard Law School Faculty Portraits Collection–either the paintings in the Library or the black and white photos formerly in Pound and now located in the WCC–you may enjoy learning more about the history of the collection. Harvard Law Today has a great article about it with a short video featuring Professor Wilkins and the Library’s own Lesley Schoenfeld, Public Services And Visual Collections Coordinator in Historical & Special Collections.

Student-Curated Exhibit “By Popular Demand” Now on View

Recently, we gave HLS students a list of some of our favorite items from Historical & Special Collections’ extensive holdings of rare books, early manuscripts, faculty papers, photographs, and art objects. We asked them to select their favorites, and the results are on view in the library’s Caspersen Room.

Photo collage of items in student-curated exhibit
The top five choices include:

  • Letter from Charles Evans Hughes to Learned Hand reminiscing about Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr..
  • HLS student admission photos of several current HLS faculty.
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg Two Ways: 1957-1958 photograph of the Harvard Law Review Board of Editors featuring a young Ginsburg, and the 2012 RBG bobblehead.
  • First edition of The Bluebook, 1926.
  • Glanville, a 12th-century English legal treatise. Our copy was written on a parchment scroll around 1300.

The exhibit was curated by HSC staff members Karen Beck, Jane Kelly, Ed Moloy, Margaret Peachy, Mary Person, Lesley Schoenfeld … and all the HLS students who cast their votes! It will remain on view through summer 2015.

Be sure to check out highlights from Historical & Special Collections’ other exhibits over at Exhibit Addenda!

Summer 2015 Access to Legal Research Databases and More

Got questions about using your Bloomberg, Lexis, or Westlaw accounts over the summer?  Here’s what you need to know about using each of the legal research databases.

BLOOMBERG LAW
If your workplace has a Bloomberg Law account, you are expected to use that, but there are no restrictions on your HLS Bloomberg accounts over the summer. Need an account? Just sign up with your HLS email address.

For questions and assistance, please contact our Bloomberg rep, Eric Malinowski.

LEXIS 
Your law school ID will let you access Lexis Advance all summer for:

  • Academic, professional, and non-profit research
  • All legal content and news you have as a law student
  • Unlimited hours per week

You do not have to register for this access. Your law school ID will remain active all summer for the above purposes. Summer access begins on the date your classes end through the date your classes begin in the fall. Normal law school terms of service apply outside of these dates.

For questions and assistance, please contact our Lexis rep, Aaron Eberle.

WESTLAW
Current students (rising 1Ls and 2Ls) may extend the access on their student Westlaw passwords for the summer if you are:

  • working for a law review or journal
  • working as a research assistant for a law professor
  • doing moot court work
  • taking summer law school classes, or completing papers or other academic projects for spring semester
  • doing an unpaid private non-profit (non-government) intern/externship or pro bono work required for graduation

Law school student passwords may not be used for government offices or agencies, law firms, corporations or other purposes unrelated to law school academic work.

To extend your password for summer access, go to lawschool.westlaw.com and click on the “Extend Your Password for the Summer” announcement on the right side of the page.

For questions and assistance, please contact our Westlaw rep, Kimberly Kenneally.

OTHER DATABASES
And of course you also have full access over the summer to most other library resources at Harvard simply using your HUID and PIN. So if you need JSTOR, HeinOnline, Academic Search Premier or most other databases, you’re all set!

QUESTIONS?
If you have questions about summer access, or any research-related questions over the summer, you can always contact the library. Our full contact details are available at Ask a Librarian.

Congrats to the Webby Award-winning Perma.cc!

perma logoWe’re thrilled to share the news that Perma.cc is the 2015 Webby award winner in the law category. Congratulations to all our colleagues who work on Perma.cc!

Perma.cc, created at the HLS Library and powered by libraries around the world, helps scholars, journals and courts create permanent links to the online sources cited in their work, saving them from link rot.

“Transliteration” of Foreign Languages in HOLLIS Records

The law library’s print collection includes many non-English books and journals, including materials published in languages that do not use the Roman/Latin alphabet.

The example below shows the HOLLIS+ record of a Russian-language book that was recently added to the collection.  Information in several of the fields, including the title, is shown first in Cyrillic, and then in what is known as “transliterated” or “Romanized” Russian:

HOLLIS+ Record of a Russian Book in the Law Library.

HOLLIS+ Record of a Russian Book in the Law Library.

The law library’s catalogers use the ALA-LC Romanization rules to create the transliterated text. Romanization tables showing these rules, for languages from Amharic to Vai, are available to the public through the Library of Congress’s website: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html.

Want to learn more about how Romanization works for non Latin/Roman alphabet-language materials in libraries?  Check out these resources:

Restricted Access at the HLS Library: April 28-May 14

Female student studying in the Reading Room of Langdell Hall

Student studying in the Reading Room of Langdell Hall. Photo by Myron Beldock, 1957, olvwork432233.

To ensure adequate study space for Law School students during the Spring Term Exam period, the Harvard Law School Library will have Restricted Access in place from Tuesday, April 28 through Thursday, May 14.

During this time, only Law School affiliates will be able to use the Law School Library for study hall purposes.

Harvard University affiliates who need to borrow regular loan materials from the collection or use a part of the collection can check in at the circulation desk, or order items to one of 18 different pick-up locations on campus via Harvard Direct, which can deliver requested materials from one site to another within 4 business days.

If you have questions about access, please contact staff at the Circulation Desk on 617-495-3455 or access@law.harvard.edu.

852 RARE: Art’s History

When we talk about the art and visual materials collection at the Harvard Law School considerable credit goes to Dean Roscoe Pound (dean 1916-1936) and librarians John Himes Arnold (librarian 1872-1913) and Eldon Revare James (librarian 1923-1943) for their work building the collection. However, the story of the collection dates back long before their time. In addition to the objects themselves, we are lucky enough to have supporting documents that provide important historical details about their acquisitions and early use.

A recent discovery that provides wonderful insight into early collecting efforts is a letter from Simon Greenleaf and Joseph Story to Chief Justice Lemuel Shaw (1781-1861) dated June 2, 1840. They write:

We are desirous of embellishing the Law Department of this Institution with likenesses of the distinguished Jurists of our country, of which we have commenced a collection: & having seen a striking likeness of yourself by Clevinger, we respectfully request you to place a copy of it at our disposal for that purpose.

For some context, the Law School, founded in 1817, had been housed in Dane Hall since the building was erected in 1832. In 1840 Greenleaf and Story, the Royall and Dane professors of law, were the school’s only instructors.

A similarly worded letter dated May 29, 1840, to an unknown recipient, can be found in the Greenleaf Papers. On the back of the page is written “Circular for busts”–perhaps this was a draft in preparation for letters like the one sent to Shaw.

Dane Hall Classroom_HLSL_olvwork364037

Classroom in Dane Hall, Harvard Law School, c.1880 Record ID olvwork364037

Not all documentation comes in manuscript form. For example, we can verify where portraits were hung thanks to the above photograph of a classroom in Dane Hall, c.1880, showing one of the Law School’s  John Marshall portraits, as well as portraits of Daniel Webster and Nathan Dane.

The full-length portrait of John Marshall (1755-1835) visible in the above mentioned picture (to the right of the desk) was painted by Chester Harding (1792-1866). Given to the school in 1847 by a group of faculty and students, the portrait is a replica of Harding’s full-length portrait commissioned by the Trustees of the Boston Athenaeum in 1830. Along with the portrait we also have a subscription list dated September 2, 1846, that includes the donors’ names and their pledged amounts. Our records indicate this subscription list was drawn up and circulated by Professor Greenleaf.

Detail of Subscription list of contributors to the purchase of
Chester Harding’s full length portrait of John Marshall, September 2, 1846
HOLLIS 9680277

This is just a small sampling of some of the supporting documents we are aware of. We look forward to future discoveries that will help tell the story of this wonderful collection.

Help Us With Our Web Re-Design!

Have a say on our web re-design. Take our usability test: April 21 & 28, 3:30 PM. Earn Swag. Email jrios@law.harvard.edu to RSVPOn April 21st and April 28th, we will be conducting usability tests on the online research guides created by Harvard librarians. These tests offer a great opportunity to give us your feedback about our guides and have a real impact on how we re-design them this summer. Best of all, you can earn swag in the form of a phone charger, umbrella, or water bottle for your trouble.

If you are available between 3pm and 5pm on Tuesday, April 21st or Tuesday, April 28th, please email jrios@law.harvard.edu to RSVP. Spaces are limited, so hurry to reserve your spot!

Please note: This usability test is limited to current Harvard students, but we always welcome feedback on our web presence via hlslweb@law.harvard.edu.