852 RARE: Hiding in Plain View – Price caps on Spanish books

Earlier this year Historical & Special Collections acquired a 1571 edition of the Spanish bishop and jurist Diego de Covarrubias y Leyva’s Clementinae, si furiosus, de homicidio, relectio—a treatise on murder published in Salamanca.

Title page of Clementinae, si furiosus, de homicidio, relectio, 1571

Title page of Clementinae, si furiosus, de homicidio, relectio, 1571

While cataloging it, I couldn’t help but notice a half-size sheet of paper tipped in following the title page.

Tasa insertThe wording looked vaguely familiar, one of the preliminaries that readers usually skips over to get to the main text. But the fact that this slip of paper appeared to be a last minute addition caught my eye. What exactly was it anyway? And how was it related to the phrase at the foot of the title page: “Esta tassado en“?

Detail of the title page: "Esta tassado en"

Detail of the title page: “Esta tassado en”

The slip of paper turns out to be a tasa (or tassa) the maximum retail price allowed for the book. This was established by the powerful Council of Castile and certified by an “escrivanos” (a clerk or notary)–in this case one Domingo de Zavala. The price of books had been regulated by law since the late fifteenth century. This price cap was based on the number and size of sheets of paper used in the production of every book published in Castile, no matter what the topic.

In the case of this slender volume of canon law, the maximum price was three maravedis per sheet. The sheets referred to in this book’s tasa (“cada pliego escripto de molde”) are the printed sheets as they came off the press— not the actual pages in the final product. This is because in the hand-press period (approximately 1455 to 1830) a single sheet, folded and cut, could produce anywhere from two to sixty-four pages, depending on the desired size of the finished book.

Unlike the tasa inserted into this copy of Covarrubias’ work, most tasas, sometimes combined with licenses, are clearly identified as such:

The license and tasa in "Capitulos generales de las cortes del año de ochenta y seys, fenecidas y publicadas en el de nouenta" (Published in Madrid, 1590)

The license and tasa in Capitulos generales de las cortes del año de ochenta y seys, fenecidas y publicadas en el de nouenta (Published in Madrid, 1590)

Sometimes the tasa is stated simply at the foot of the title page:

Detail from title page of "Reportorio de la nueva recopilacion de las leyes del reyno" (Published in Alcalá de Henares, 1571)

Detail from title page of Reportorio de la nueva recopilacion de las leyes del reyno (Published in Alcalá de Henares, 1571)

Perhaps the latter option was the original intention in Covarrubias’ 1571 edition …

Esta tassado en… but for reasons unknown the maximum retail price established for the book was never added so the separate tasa statement needed to be inserted after printing.

In addition to capping book prices, the Council of Castile had a firm hand on the business of publishing and printing books in other ways. This included the issuing of licenses to publish, privileges (the right to reprint), censorship, and other forms of governmental oversight. The Spanish book trade continued to be tightly regulated well into the eighteenth century, but the tasa for books was discontinued in 1763, early in the reign of Carlos III, King of Spain.

New e-resources at Harvard

The Harvard Library has an astounding amount of resources, with new titles coming in every day!  For help efficiently navigating it all, make a time to meet with a librarian or contact the Reference Desk.

Among our newest e-resources:

Note: all “about” descriptions are taken from the resources themselves.

Digital Theatre Plus

About: Watch high quality films of leading theatre productions | Discover how plays are brought to the stage in interviews with the creative teams | Learn about interpretive choice through detailed analysis of play texts | Teach key plays with stimulating and relevant support

Japan Chronicle

About: The English-language Japan Chronicle Weekly (1902 – 1940) is the newspaper of record for Japan’s engagement with modernity and its emergence, through war, political and social upheaval and seismic social change in East Asia, onto the world stage in the first half of the twentieth century. Historians of East Asia have long seen the Japan Chronicle as a uniquely valuable resource. This well-informed, controversial but always readable source of news and opinion on Japan and East Asia offers an intriguing and lively Japanese complement to the North-China Herald, available in the East Asia Archive Online since 2011.

Prowessdx (India and Singapore)

About: Prowess is a database of the financial performance of companies. Annual Reports of companies and data available from stock exchanges and regulators are the principal sources of the data. Prowessdx is a delivery of the Prowess database that is specially designed for academia. Prowessdx facilitates easy downloading of the data in simple text format.

The database covers the profit and loss statement, balance sheet and ratios based on these. In the case of listed companies, it includes cash flow statement, quarterly financial statements, share prices, corporate action and daily total returns. Financial statements based on consolidated and standalone basis are available. Financial statements are standardised. The database does not suffer from any deliberate survival bias.

Association of Research Libraries SPEC Kit collection 

About: SPEC surveys gather information from ARL member institutions on current research library practices and policies. SPEC Kits combine the survey results and documentation from ARL member institutions to guide libraries as they address the ever-changing challenges facing libraries. These guides help libraries learn about current practice in research libraries, implement new practices and technologies, manage change, and improve performance.

Faculty Book Talk: Laurence H. Tribe’s Uncertain Justice: The Roberts Court and the Constitution, Friday November 21 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of  Professor Laurence  H. Tribe’s recently published book with Joshua Matz, Uncertain Justice:  The Roberts Court and the Constitution.

Friday November 21, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

Professor Tribe is the Carl M. Loeb University Professor and Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard, has taught at its Law School since 1968 and was voted the best professor by the graduating class of 2000.  He has written over 115 books and articles, including his treatise, American Constitutional Law, cited more than any other legal text since 1950. Former Solicitor General Erwin Griswold wrote: “[N]o book, and no lawyer not on the [Supreme] Court, has ever had a greater influence on the development of American constitutional law,” and the Northwestern Law Review opined that no-one else “in American history has… simultaneously achieved Tribe’s preeminence… as a practitioner and… scholar of constitutional law.”

Tribe Uncertain Justice Poster

“With the Supreme Court more influential than ever, this eye-opening book tells the story of how the Roberts Court is shaking the foundation of our nation’s laws

From Citizens United to its momentous rulings regarding Obamacare and gay marriage, the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has profoundly affected American life. Yet the court remains a mysterious institution, and the motivations of the nine men and women who serve for life are often obscure. Now, in Uncertain Justice, Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz show the surprising extent to which the Roberts Court is revising the meaning of our Constitution.

This essential book arrives at a make-or-break moment for the nation and the court. Political gridlock, cultural change, and technological progress mean that the court’s decisions on key topics—including free speech, privacy, voting rights, and presidential power—could be uniquely durable. Acutely aware of their opportunity, the justices are rewriting critical aspects of constitutional law and redrawing the ground rules of American government. Tribe—one of the country’s leading constitutional lawyers—and Matz dig deeply into the court’s recent rulings, stepping beyond tired debates over judicial “activism” to draw out hidden meanings and silent battles. The undercurrents they reveal suggest a strikingly different vision for the future of our country, one that is sure to be hotly debated.

Filled with original insights and compelling human stories, Uncertain Justice illuminates the most colorful story of all—how the Supreme Court and the Constitution frame the way we live.”  – Henry Holt and Co.

Book talk panelists include:

Martha Minow

 

 

 

Dean Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

Richard Lazarus

 

 

 

Professor Richard Lazarus, Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

“Tribe and Matz set out to portray the Roberts court in what they see as its messy complexity. It is no doubt difficult to write with clarity about uncertainty, but Tribe and Matz largely succeed. Surveying a shifting legal landscape, they offer crisp accounts of key cases.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Well-written and highly readable…. The strength of the book is its painstaking explanation of all sides of the critical cases, giving full voice and weight to conservative and liberal views alike…. The common-sense tone that prevails in most of the book is a tribute to the mastery of the Supreme Court by Tribe, a keen observer of the justices and of constitutional law for more than four decades.”—The Washington Post

“Full of bright and unconventional wisdom… Rejecting tiresome conventions of court reporting — liberals vs. conservatives, restraint vs. activism — the authors bring fresh insight to the court’s work.”—The Los Angeles Times

“An engaging and accessible history of the Court’s major decisions … [Tribe is] among this nation’s most sophisticated thinkers about constitutional law.”—New York Review of Books

“Marvelous…Tribe and Matz’s insights are illuminating…. [They] offer well-crafted overviews of key cases decided by the Roberts Court … [and] chart the Supreme Court’s conservative path, clarifying complex cases in accessible terms.”—The Chicago Tribune

“Tribe is a particularly effective messenger… [and] is among the nation’s most celebrated legal scholars…. By giving the Justices their due, this book reminds us what it really means to respect the Constitution and its mission.” —The Los Angeles Review of Books

“A well-researched, unsettling investigation of recent trends in the nation’s highest court… A near-forensic dissection of the court’s work under Roberts … Many of their conclusions will be eye-openers.”—Kirkus Reviews

“[An] insightful perspective on the Supreme Court… [and a] nuanced look at how the court under Chief Justice Roberts has arrived at momentous decisions from Citizens United to support for Obamacare.”—Booklist

“Laurence Tribe and Joshua Matz have produced a brilliantly layered account of the Roberts Court. Filled with memorable stories and striking references to literature, baseball and popular culture, this book is a joy to read from start to finish—an irresistible narrative that will delight the general public as well as journalists and scholars.”—Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of Team of Rivals and The Bully Pulpit

“Laurence Tribe, the foremost constitutional scholar and advocate of his generation, and Joshua Matz have written a brilliantly insightful and engaging account of the Roberts Court. Relentlessly fair-minded in its judgments about the justices and their work, Uncertain Justice is an indispensable guide to the Court’s recent history and, more importantly, to its future.”—Jeffrey Toobin, author of The Nine and Senior Legal Analyst, CNN

Uncertain Justice is a fascinating, penetrating, and highly readable analysis of the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence. Anyone who aspires to understand how and in what ways the Court is influencing our lives and our laws will want to read this superb and evenhanded book.”—Theodore B. Olson, U.S. Solicitor General for President George W. Bush

“No one knows the Supreme Court like Laurence Tribe, and no one brings its decisions to life like Tribe and Joshua Matz. Uncertain Justice is spellbinding—whether you care about gay marriage, health care, NSA surveillance, or gun control, this magnificent book will widen and deepen your understanding of our constitutional landscape.”—Kathleen M. Sullivan, Dean, Stanford Law School (1999-2004)

Uncertain Justice provides a uniquely valuable perspective on the often confusing swirl around the most divisive legal, social, and political issues of our time. Once I started reading it, I just could not stop.”—Ron Klain, Chief of Staff, Vice Presidents Biden (2009-11) and Gore (1995-99)

Uncertain Justice is must reading for anyone interested in the current unannounced agenda of the Supreme Court. Lucidly written and impeccably reasoned, this essential book documents the ways in which the Roberts Court has engaged in a wholesale revision of the Constitution.”—Scott Turow, author of One LPresumed Innocent, and Identical

“We need this book. It is a brilliant discussion of the murky, quirky, troubling, and uncertain Roberts Court. Written in simple, elegant prose for the general public, Uncertain Justice is the best explanation we have of how this Court reaches its most important decisions.”—John Jay Osborn Jr., author of The Paper Chase

Uncertain Justice offers a page-turning and accessible analysis of the Roberts Court and its individual justices. It illuminates the often sharp disagreements and occasionally surprising agreements that mark the Court’s performance. For those seeking a thoughtful, balanced, and fair-minded review of the Roberts Court, this is the book to read.”—Geoffrey Stone, Dean, University of Chicago Law School (1987-94)

“Put simply, Uncertain Justice is a great book. Timely and important, it tells it like it is and captures the essence of the Court’s changing role in American life. It is an amazing piece of work.”—Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

 

Designer in Residence at the Harvard Library Innovation Lab

The Harvard Library Innovation Lab and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society are looking for a web designer to help us build tools to explore the open Internet and define the future of libraries.

We are academics, activists, and entrepreneurs — often all three at once. As the Berkman Center mission statement explains, “Our method is to build out into cyberspace, record data as we go, self-study, and share. Our mode is entrepreneurial nonprofit.” Or as the Library Innovation Lab puts it: “We hack libraries to bring out all the great stuff they have to offer.”

We are seeking a designer who can work with our multi-disciplinary team to build beautiful and effective web tools. You should have vision and passion to contribute to our broad vision for the Internet, libraries, and society, as well as energy and deep technical expertise to deliver on our ambitious goals.

Projects range in scope from fast-moving prototypes to long-term innovations. Some are in full production, with minor tweaks needed, and some would benefit from your vision for wholesale rebranding and revision. Examples of projects to which you might contribute include Perma.cc, a web and link archiving service; H2O, a free platform for creating, sharing and adapting open course materials; and research projects focusing on reinforcing the overall health of the Internet such as Internet Monitor, Chilling Effects, and Amber.

The successful Designer in Residence will be an experienced collaborator with outstanding digital prototyping and front-end development skills and both a keen eye for detail and the ability to see a bigger perspective. He or she will have experience designing with accessibility, usability, and best practices in mind. This is a term limited position running through Spring and Summer semesters (January-August 2015).

Requirements:

BA; experienced web designer with 5+ years of professional experience (2-4 years in web development) and a strong portfolio of compelling UI/UX design.

• Familiar with back-end implementations and front-end presentations
• Responsive to feedback and at ease with rapid iteration based on that feedback
• Skilled with graphic editing tools
• Modern HTML5 CSS3 and JavaScript expertise
• Experienced with responsive web design
• Expert understanding of effective UI/UX patterns and best practices
• Excellent verbal and written communication skills
• Strong organizational skills and ability to prioritize work while working on multiple simultaneous projects.
• Excellent interpersonal and teamwork skills, positive attitude and sense of fun.
• Experience working with multiple stakeholders on a given project.

To apply go to: http://hr.harvard.edu/jobs

Faculty Book Talk: I. Glenn Cohen’s Patients With Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics, Wednesday, November 19 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor I. Glenn Cohen’s recently published book, Patients With Passports:  Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics.

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Lunch will be served.

I. Glenn Cohen is Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics. He is one of the world’s leading experts on the intersection of bioethics (or medical ethics), and the law, as well as health law. He also teaches civil procedure. Prior to becoming a professor, he served as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and as a lawyer for U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division, Appellate Staff, where he handled litigation in the Courts of Appeals and in the U.S. Supreme Court. He was selected as a Radcliffe Institute Fellow (2012-2013) and by the Greenwall Foundation to receive a Faculty Scholar Award in Bioethics. He also leads the Ethics and Law initiative as part of the multi-million dollar NIH funded Harvard Catalyst for The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center program. Professor Cohen is the author of more than 60 articles and chapters, and his award-winning work has appeared in leading legal law review journals including: Stanford, Cornell, and Southern California; medical journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, and JAMA; bioethics journals including the American Journal of Bioethics, the Hastings Center Report; and for public health, the American Journal of Public Health. He is the editor of The Globalization of Health Care: Legal and Ethical Issues (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Now Available:  Front matter and first two chapters of Patients With Passports:  Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics, Free download via SSRN! or order directly from Oxford University Press with discount promotional code 33041.

Patients With Passports poster

 

“Can your employer require you to travel to India for a hip replacement as a condition of insurance coverage? If injury results, can you sue the doctor, hospital or insurer for medical malpractice in the country where you live? Can a country prohibit its citizens from helping a relative travel to Switzerland for assisted suicide? What about travel for abortion? In Patients with Passports, I. Glenn Cohen tackles these important questions, and provides the first comprehensive legal and ethical analysis of medical tourism.

Medical tourism is a growing multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care. Some seek legitimate services like hip replacements and travel to avoid queues, save money, or because their insurer has given them an incentive to do so. Others seek to circumvent prohibitions on accessing services at home and go abroad to receive abortions, assisted suicide, commercial surrogacy, or experimental stem cell treatments.

In this book, author I. Glenn Cohen focuses on patients traveling for cardiac bypass and other legal services to places like India, Thailand, and Mexico, and analyzes issues of quality of care, disease transmission, liability, private and public health insurance, and the effects of this trade on foreign health care systems. He goes on to examine medical tourism for services illegal in the patient’s home country, such as organ purchase, abortion, assisted suicide, fertility services, and experimental stem cell treatments. Here, Cohen examines issues such as extraterritorial criminalization, exploitation, immigration, and the protection of children. Through compelling narratives, expert data, and industry explanations Patients with Passports enables the reader to connect with the most prevalent legal and ethical issues facing medical tourism today.” — Oxford University Press

Book talk panelists include:

Amitabh Chandra

 

Professor Amitabh Chandra is an economist, a Professor of Public Policy and Director of Health Policy Research at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where he also Director of PhD Admissions and Area Chair for Social and Urban Policy. He is a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) Panel of Health Advisors, and is a Research Associate at the IZA Institute in Bonn, Germany and at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

Nir Eyal

 

 

Professor Nir Eyal is Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine (Medical Ethics) at the Harvard Medical School. His primary appointment is at Harvard University’s campus-wide Program in Ethics and Health.

 

Alicia Ely Yamin

 

 

Professor Alicia Ely Yamin is a Lecturer on Global Health and Policy Director at the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University.

 

 

Practice Like a Lawyer with PLI

HLS now featuring Practising Law Institute (PLI)

Practising Law Institute’s Discover PLUS (PLI) provides access to Treatises, Answer Books, and Forms for standard US practice, and is especially strong for transactional materials.

In addition, PLI offers Course Handbooks and Program Transcripts from its seminars and publications.  PLI has a ton of very specific guidance by lawyers for lawyers.

Program Transcripts are especially helpful for learning about an evolving point of law – where you can learn from expert lawyers on how best to advise clients and manage deals.

For example, there is unique guidance on customizing derivatives contracts, or on advising private equity firms on making the most of IPO lock-ups.

PLI platform content listing; limited PLI treatises (books) are available on Bloomberg Law.

For more guidance on transactional law practice, check out Practical Law (West).

Faculty Book Talk: Christine A. Desan’s Making Money: Coin, Currency, and the Coming of Capitalism, Wednesday, November 12 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Professor Christine A. Desan’s recently published book, Making Money:  Coin, Currency, and the Coming of Capitalism.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 12:00 noon.

Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room. (Directions).

Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.

Free and open to the public.  Lunch will be served.

UPDATE: if you purchase the book directly from Oxford University Press, you may use the promo code 32912 to receive a 30% discount off the list price!

Professor Desan is Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law. She teaches about the international monetary system, the constitutional law of money, constitutional history, political economy, and legal theory.  She is the co-founder of Harvard’s Program on the Study of Capitalism, an interdisciplinary project that brings together classes, resources, research funds, and advising aimed at exploring that topic.  With its co-director, Prof. Sven Beckert (History), she has taught the Program’s anchoring research seminar, the Workshop on the Political Economy of Modern Capitalism, since 2005.

Desan book talk poster

“Money travels the modern world in disguise. It looks like a convention of human exchange – a commodity like gold or a medium like language. But its history reveals that money is a very different matter. It is an institution engineered by political communities to mark and mobilize resources. As societies change the way they create money, they change the market itself – along with the rules that structure it, the politics and ideas that shape it, and the benefits that flow from it.

One particularly dramatic transformation in money’s design brought capitalism to England. For centuries, the English government monopolized money’s creation. The Crown sold people coin for a fee in exchange for silver and gold. ‘Commodity money’ was a fragile and difficult medium; the first half of the book considers the kinds of exchange and credit it invited, as well as the politics it engendered. Capitalism arrived when the English reinvented money at the end of the 17th century. When it established the Bank of England, the government shared its monopoly over money creation for the first time with private investors, institutionalizing their self-interest as the pump that would produce the money supply. The second half of the book considers the monetary revolution that brought unprecedented possibilities and problems. The invention of circulating public debt, the breakdown of commodity money, the rise of commercial bank currency, and the coalescence of ideological commitments that came to be identified with the Gold Standard – all contributed to the abundant and unstable medium that is modern money. All flowed as well from a collision between the individual incentives and public claims at the heart of the system. The drama had constitutional dimension: money, as its history reveals, is a mode of governance in a material world. That character undermines claims in economics about money’s neutrality. The monetary design innovated in England would later spread, producing the global architecture of modern money.” — Oxford University Press

Book talk panelists include:

John Coates

Professor John Coates is the John F. Cogan, Jr. Professor of Law and Economics at Harvard Law School, and Research Director of the Program on the Legal Profession.  He has testified before Congress and provided consulting services to the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Department of Treasury, the New York Stock Exchange, and participants in the financial markets, including individuals, mutual funds, hedge funds, investment banks, commercial banks, and private equity funds. In addition, he served as independent distribution consultant for the Securities and Exchange Commission in two “Fair Fund” distributions to investors – including one of the first distributions (of $50 million relating to an enforcement action regarding payment for order flow), and one of the largest distributions (of $306 million relating to enforcement actions regarding market timing and late trading). He has also served as an independent representative of individual and institutional clients of institutional trustees and money managers.

Lauren Coyle

 

Lauren Coyle is Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School and Lecturer in Social Studies in Harvard College, where she also serves on the Board of Academic Advisers. She received a Ph.D. in Sociocultural Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2014 and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2008. Most recently, she was a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency research fellow, as well as Dorothy Porter & Charles Harris Wesley Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute for African and African American Research in the Hutchins Center at Harvard.

Duncan KennedyProfessor Duncan Kennedy is the Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School. He was a founding member of the Critical Legal Studies movement. Kennedy received an A.B. in Economics from Harvard College in 1964 and in 1970 earned an LL.B. from Yale Law School. After completing a clerkship with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart, Kennedy joined the Harvard Law School faculty in 1971 as an Assistant Professor, becoming a full Professor in 1976. He has taught contracts, torts, property, trusts, the history of legal thought, low income housing law and policy, Israel/Palestine legal issues, the globalization of law and legal thought, and the politics of private law.  His publications have contributed to legal and social theory, the history of legal thought, legal semiotics, law and economics, contract law, and legal education.

Paul TuckerSir Paul Tucker is a Senior Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Business School. He was Deputy Governor at the Bank of England from 2009 to October 2013, having joined the Bank in 1980. He was a member of each of the Bank of England’s statutory policy committees: the Monetary Policy Committee, Financial Policy Committee (vice chair), Prudential Regulatory Authority Board (vice chair), as well as of the Court of Directors. Internationally, he was a member of the steering committee of the G20 Financial Stability Board, and chaired its Committee on the Resolution of Cross-Border Banks in order to solve the “too big to fail” problem. He was a member of the board of directors of the Bank for International Settlements, and was chair of the Basel Committee for Payment and Settlement Systems from April 2012. He is a Visiting Fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford, and a Governor of the Ditchley Foundation.

 

 

Book Talk: Visiting Professor Michael Ashley Stein, Disability and Equity at Work, Wednesday, November 5 at noon

The Harvard Law School Library staff invites you to attend a book talk and panel discussion in celebration of Visiting Professor Michael Ashley Stein’s recently published book with co-editors Jody Heymann and Gonzalo Moreno, Disability and Equity at Work  (2014, Oxford University Press).

Wednesday, November 5, 2014, 12:00 noon.
Harvard Law School, Langdell Caspersen Room. (Directions).
Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library.
Free and open to the public. Lunch will be served.

Visiting Professor Michael Stein holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. from Cambridge University.  He is co-founder and Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability, as well as Professor at William & Mary Law School.  An internationally acclaimed expert on disability law and policy, Stein participated in the drafting of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, works with disabled persons organizations around the world, actively consults with international governments on their disability laws and policies, and advises a number of United Nations bodies.

Michael Stein Poster

“Despite international and national guarantees of equal rights, there remains a great deal to be done to achieve global employment equality for individuals with disabilities. In OECD countries, the employment rate of persons with disabilities was just over 40%, compared to 75% for persons without a disability; in many low- and middle-income countries, the employment rates are even lower.

There are numerous reasons why persons with disabilities fare poorly in the labor market; Disability and Equity at Work is the first book to document what can be done to improve this imbalance.  Chapters in this volume address all relevant facets of this topic and include:
· Extensive examination of the factors contributing to inequitable access to work among persons with disability
· Analysis of the economic benefits of increasing employment equity
· Successful employment strategies at every stage of a worker’s career
· Evidence-based recommendations and in-depth case studies of innovative policies and programs around the world.” — Oxford University Press

Book talk panelists include:

Elizabeth Bartholet

 

 

Professor Elizabeth Bartholet, Morris Wasserstein Public Interest Professor of Law
and Faculty Director, Child Advocacy Program, Harvard Law School;

Martha Field

 

 

Professor Martha Field, Langdell Professor of Law, Harvard Law School;

 

Elizabeth Emmens

 

 

Visiting Professor Elizabeth Emens, Robert Braucher Visiting Professor of Law, Harvard Law School.

 

Support Open Access Scholarship with the Open Access Button

Open Access Button logo. CC BY.

Open Access Button logo. CC BY.

As you may already know, this week is Open Access Week, a week devoted to “promoting Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research,” and Harvard is hosting a number of events in recognition of this important goal (you can find the full list on the Office for Scholarly Communication website).

One way you can advocate for Open Access now and in the future (while simultaneously helping your own research) is to start using Open Access Button. Once you have installed the bookmarklet, you can click on it every time you encounter an academic work that is behind a paywall. Pushing the button (which works in all browsers and also offers a Chrome plugin and a Firefox extension as well as a version for use on Android devices) will automatically search for a free version of the paper that you can access immediately and, if such a version is not found, will automatically contact the author about accessing the paper. If you can’t access the work immediately, your story will be collected and added to the list of stories used by Open Access Button to advocate for changes in the publishing approach for academic works. It is important to note that Open Access Button will make information about your use of the button publicly available, but this information will help to show the importance of Open Access in academia and just might help you find Open Access versions of scholarship you need.

Are you a developer? Open Access Button is licensed under an open source software license and all of their code is available on GitHub. Check out their For Developers page to learn about how you can contribute to the project.

Have You Ever Wanted to Contribute to Wikipedia?

OAlogoIf so, now is the time! As you may already know, next week is Open Access Week. To celebrate this event, Harvard is hosting a number of events (you can see the full list on the Office for Scholarly Communications website) including two Wikipedia Edit-A-Thons. The first Edit-A-Thon will be held on Monday, October 20th from 3 to 6pm in Room B-30 of Lamont Library. It will focus in particular on the over 1300 images that have been added to Wikimedia Commons from the Houghton Collection and will also offer instruction for those who are new to editing Wikipedia. The second Edit-A-Thon will be held on Friday, October 24th from 1pm to 3pm in Science Center B09 and will include help in creating a Wikipedia account and editing or creating articles. Both events are designed to encourage people to drop by for as much or as little time as they can spare, so stop by one or both to learn about how you can contribute to Wikipedia.

If you want to create an account before the event or if you aren’t able to attend, you can also check out our guide entitled Contributing to Wikipedia & Wikimedia Commons to learn more about how to start and account and start making a contribution!